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manierata

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About manierata

  • Birthday July 1

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    nyc
  • Application Season
    2013 Fall
  • Program
    art history

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  1. Thank you! Hope you get something too!
  2. https://www.clir.org/fellowships/mellon For dissertation writing.
  3. I'd really really really really like to get the CLIR! Fingers crossed! And thanks for asking!
  4. Also an Italy alternate. Che sará, sará! Congrats to all of the accepted Fulbrighters and best of luck in your studies! (And here's to hoping that something else comes through....)
  5. Amor Vincit Omnia: Love as a Destructive Force in Italian Arts and Literature April 24-25 2015 The students of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures in the specialization of Italian and the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago invite papers for an interdisciplinary graduate student conference “Amor Vincit Omnia: Love as a Destructive Force in Italian Arts and Literature”, to be held on April 24 and 25, 2015. Keynote Address: Dr. Giuseppe Mazzotta, Sterling Professor of Humanities for Italian, Yale University Closing Address: Dr. Hendrik Dey, Professor of Art History, Hunter College Call for Papers: The motto “Love conquers all” has become ubiquitous for love’s ability to overcome all obstacles, physical as well as psychological, that impede the union of two lovers. However, in its original context “amor vincit omnia” in Virgil actually refers to love’s ability to destroy both the lover and the beloved; the speaker of this phrase, Gallus, immediately kills himself after its declaration. The destructive nature of love has been addressed by Italian artists and writers from antiquity to modern times. Virgil’s depiction of Dido, Bernini’s Apollo and Daphne, Dante’s Paolo and Francesca, Verdi’s Aida, and, more recently, Fellini’s Cabiria and De Chirico’s Ariadne all explore love’s disastrous consequences. This conference aims to explore the varieties of representation of sorrowful love and its evolution over time; new understandings that can be gleaned from a variety of evidence; and dialogue and divergence between portrayals of tragic Italian love across the Humanities. We seek papers that address the theme of Amore vincit omnia, or love as a motivator for the demise of the self or the destruction of the object of desire. Potential topics this conference seeks to examine include, but are not limited to: Objects of desire: variations of Venus, the Donna Angelicata, and Adonis, and the effect of gender on portrayals of both the lover and the beloved Unorthodoxy in depictions of sexuality Portraiture, funeral monuments, and elegies as expressions of longing or loss Funeral processions and the relationship of death and urbanism Tragedy within the familial or Platonic framework Narcissism as an impetus towards self-destruction Suicide and self-harm as a result of unrequited or deceptive love Alienation from Godly or spiritual love Love misdirected at animals or the inanimate Philosophies of tragic love in art and literature Portrayals or imitations of the Italian lover in theater Self-destructive love through the medium of cinema Theories, remedies, and consequences of lovesickness Music’s ability to provoke and dramatize tragic love Please email a 250 word abstract to italiangradconference@gmail.com by 1 February 2015, including your Name, C.V., and any technology requests. All current graduate students, as well as junior scholars in Art History, Literature, and related disciplines are invited to submit an abstract to this conference. Abstracts will be accepted in English, Italian, and French.
  6. Amor Vincit Omnia: Love as a Destructive Force in Italian Arts and Literature April 24-25 2015 The students of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures in the specialization of Italian and the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago invite papers for an interdisciplinary graduate student conference “Amor Vincit Omnia: Love as a Destructive Force in Italian Arts and Literature”, to be held on April 24 and 25, 2015. Keynote Address: Dr. Giuseppe Mazzotta, Sterling Professor of Humanities for Italian, Yale University Closing Address: Dr. Hendrik Dey, Professor of Art History, Hunter College Call for Papers: The motto “Love conquers all” has become ubiquitous for love’s ability to overcome all obstacles, physical as well as psychological, that impede the union of two lovers. However, in its original context “amor vincit omnia” in Virgil actually refers to love’s ability to destroy both the lover and the beloved; the speaker of this phrase, Gallus, immediately kills himself after its declaration. The destructive nature of love has been addressed by Italian artists and writers from antiquity to modern times. Virgil’s depiction of Dido, Bernini’s Apollo and Daphne, Dante’s Paolo and Francesca, Verdi’s Aida, and, more recently, Fellini’s Cabiria and De Chirico’s Ariadne all explore love’s disastrous consequences. This conference aims to explore the varieties of representation of sorrowful love and its evolution over time; new understandings that can be gleaned from a variety of evidence; and dialogue and divergence between portrayals of tragic Italian love across the Humanities. We seek papers that address the theme of Amore vincit omnia, or love as a motivator for the demise of the self or the destruction of the object of desire. Potential topics this conference seeks to examine include, but are not limited to: Objects of desire: variations of Venus, the Donna Angelicata, and Adonis, and the effect of gender on portrayals of both the lover and the beloved Unorthodoxy in depictions of sexuality Portraiture, funeral monuments, and elegies as expressions of longing or loss Funeral processions and the relationship of death and urbanism Tragedy within the familial or Platonic framework Narcissism as an impetus towards self-destruction Suicide and self-harm as a result of unrequited or deceptive love Alienation from Godly or spiritual love Love misdirected at animals or the inanimate Philosophies of tragic love in art and literature Portrayals or imitations of the Italian lover in theater Self-destructive love through the medium of cinema Theories, remedies, and consequences of lovesickness Music’s ability to provoke and dramatize tragic love Please email a 250 word abstract to italiangradconference@gmail.com by 1 February 2015, including your Name, C.V., and any technology requests. All current graduate students, as well as junior scholars in Art History, Literature, and related disciplines are invited to submit an abstract to this conference. Abstracts will be accepted in English, Italian, and French.
  7. Hey all, Wanted to alert all the Renaissance Art History people out there of an opportunity to present your research at conference in Raleigh this March. Graduate funding available by merit (paper must be submitted in advance of the conference). Please follow the link for CFP and info. On the Abstract Submission form, please submit to The Society for Renaissance Art History (there is no fee or obligation to join the society, but this enables you to be eligible for the travel money and puts your paper with the other Art History papers instead of the general pool of mixed submissions). Buona fortuna! http://www.scrc.us.com/cfp_scrc2015.shtml
  8. I was almost fully-funded at Hunter, and I loved it, and I highly recommend the program, even if you have to pay. It's $12,000 for the whole degree over 2 years.
  9. It sounds like youre doing really interesting work! Keep it up! Honestly, I think it would be great if we could use some of this infinite internet space to talk about ideas with other young scholars, but I fear we are in the minority. Always feel free to PM me with your ren/ baroque questions!
  10. Hey! I'm happy to add my two cents, because I love this sculpture so much and love to talk about it, and because it was so important to Michelangelo. I also love that someone is using this forum to actually talk about ideas! I would say with reference to Michelangelo there are 2 places you need to look besides the slaves: the Julius II tomb sculptures and the Last Judgment (Christ). There are also interesting theories that the Lacoon was a actually a forgery created by Michelangelo, and that article is available on Jstor. It always also seemed to me that there's something very Lacoon-y going on in Rubens' Descent from the Cross, though I've never really thought much about it. I have the same hunch about some of Tintoretto's work (esp. the Golgotha in the Scuola Grande di San Rocco) but again, I haven't really thought it through, and it's not Barqoue. Even more strangely, I think there's an argument to say that's something is going on in Goya's Saturn Devouring his Sons (the position of the legs, the diagonal of the shoulders, the expression), which is super cool to think about because it's a total perversion of the subject matter. Another thing to think about are the later-century sculptures of Ugolino and his Sons, a subject which comes from a Canto in Dante. http://www.kingsgalleries.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/raising-of-the-cross-pieter-pauwel-rubens1.jpg Please keep me abreast of any of your findings. I'd love to continue the conversation via private message, if you want to blow through some ideas. Again, these are just impressions I've had, and may not stand up to close-looking. Thanks for the great question! Sorry that you originally posted so long ago and I missed it!
  11. looks like shes still at tufts. https://tufts.academia.edu/MonicaMcTighe
  12. I was told by my advisor that you could get a 1 percentile in math and no one would care. At least that was for my school, perhaps it's different for others. Maybe wait and see how you did on the writing? If you got a 6, why worry?
  13. hey all-- wondering if any of you guys are doing summer language programs. I'm doing cuny's intensive latin institute. will i see anyone there?
  14. then 9 hrs should be fine--raphael will be a non-event, as you will soon see. everyone likes weintraub and his course workload seems fair. hahn has a reputation for being terrifying and hard but then giving good grades at the end. you should be fine. start studying for the comp. get on to artstor asap for the images.
  15. hey mississippi--whos teaching modern? weintraub?
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