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uncle_socks

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uncle_socks last won the day on December 1 2019

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  1. eh i disagree with the above. you only get one shot at a phd. you need to do what is best for you. this happens all the time when people get late offers at better places, especially when initial schools make you sign stuff so early. i'm sure you won't be the first or the last to reneg with the london school. they won't be super happy, but they're not going to sue you.
  2. yeah this is normal. if you've already accepted the offer, it is unlikely there will be a visit day. it's very likely that you'll hear from admin once 4/15 has passed (or maybe a little bit later) once the cohort is settled, and they'll give everyone each other's emails and tell you what to expect.
  3. I agree with the post at large but just wanted to highlight that schools are not in conversation in order to admit as efficiently as possible. If Princeton wants someone, and even if they know that person has say, a Harvard offer, Princeton will still make the offer. Likewise, admissions committees aren't constantly asking their colleagues at other schools "Has Bunnies accepted your offer yet? They haven't accepted ours."
  4. NYU is very formal/econometric and is boutique with respect to that bent. They select heavily on demonstrated quantitative ability. When I visited they told me they admitted us all because we have the quant skills that it takes to succeed in their program. Read NYU's own FAQ or Samii's webpage (he also calls it a boutique program) to get some hard evidence of this: they care so much more about quant skills than anyone else. Of course most people with high quant skills don't just do pure methods; they often have substantive interests and go in the job market as an expert in that substantive fie
  5. They're definitely more "mainstream" than say rochester, but at emory you're still likely within this [political economy very broadly defined] framework. Likely not doing political theory, APD, qualitative stuff.
  6. fwiw nyu and rochester are more boutique than full-service departments, which will hurt them in aggregate rankings. they each do a couple of things really good (and they largely recruit students in those areas so placement is fine), but they're not great once you move outside of those strengths. like in the top 10 schools you could do nearly whatever, from political theory to APD to formal theory to political economy and turn out okay, while the same cannot be said for nyu or rochester (or wustl or sorta emory for that matter).
  7. Modern polling companies would kill for a response rate of 32%. Like if the 32% response rate is what makes you skeptical, you better be super skeptical of basically all survey and experimental inferences within our field.
  8. Yes. You only have one shot to go to grad school. Even if it's mean to the school that first accepted you, if it's a step up, you should take the new opportunity.
  9. yeah i've read every damn page of this thread and i can't think of anyone. people who i seriously thought would sweep this year (here and irl) have like 1 CHYMPS offer. unforunately i'm not very hopeful for waitlist offers, if there aren't a ton of cross-admits, yield is going to be insane everywhere.
  10. I wouldn't say truly permanent. I think the brunt of the pain is on this year. Like, Columbia and UNC aren't closed shop forever, and the schools that are temporarily offering extra paid years for phd students due to covid will have that money back in the department ready to have normal cohort sizes within a couple of years. Departments don't want to get smaller and most will resist long-term downsizing if at all possible. That being said, it's quite normal to get shut out completely one year, and then get into a super top program the next year. It's not abnormal to apply to every top 10
  11. It's almost always not that students' goals were not to pursue that path, if they knew they reasonably could. The job market sucks. People from top 20 schools are thankful to get TT jobs at directional state schools. Some people really do realize that academic jobs are not for them. But most people who end up in industry (especially if we exclude the small sliver of industry that has starting pay in the six figures) would rather have an R1 job if they had the choice. Schools will very often say stuff like "oh they chose to be in industry, that's why they're not in academia" but it's very
  12. If it's anything like past years they'll hit you with the vague "not all decisions have been made" line. However, all that really means is they're considering the app for the unfunded MA, not that you're still in the running for the phd.
  13. Most schools do have efficient ways of sending rejections...Northwestern literally does this every year though where they send a bunch of accepts earlier, and drag the rejections on forever. Read some old threads and y'all will see that this is Classic Northwestern behavior. I believe that many schools don't want transparency because the system is easily gamed. In retrospect, it's not hard to do all the things needed to get into top political science programs if you have enough time. It's just hard to know what those things are, and have access to all those things, at the right ti
  14. Not my subfield so I wouldn't trust my own feedback so my advice is very general. During visit days, tell your professors what schools you're considering. Most will give you very frank advice about where they think your best bet is. Most are morbidly curious about where you got into, and will ask that question right off the bat, and it can be kinda daunting to say something along the lines of "I got into Michigan" to an Emory professor, for example, but trust me, honesty is useful here. They'll try to sell their own program, at least a little bit, for sure, but ultimately most everyone wants t
  15. I would get this up first before taking online courses. IMO I think this is too low for NYU, assuming you're not a theorist. If you think politics wouldn't require much math, you're a little off in both your understanding of modern dominant political science and the NYU department as a whole.
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