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pax et caritas

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  1. Thanks for your response—I’ve been having to remind myself that’s it’s okay, even beneficial to a degree, to find potential supervisors whose work doesn’t affirm some of my beliefs. I’ll certainly be keeping your advice in mind.
  2. I did the math review in the ETS study book, but that's basically it. Granted, it was a fairly large section of the book, and I probably took about a month with it. You're absolutely right about the writing sample. I've recently decided I'm going to write basically a new one, so I might need to focus on that.
  3. This was extremely helpful, thank you. It’s a little frustrating, because I think I’d be more interested in receiving the more philosophical training, but I also want my research to focus on practical applications of contemporary political theories to, say, what I take to be some of liberalism’s failure. With that in mind, do you think I’d be better suited for one or the other?
  4. I’m a recent graduate who doubled in philosophy & political science, and I’m going to be applying to grad school this fall. I know “political theory” and “political philosophy” are sometimes used interchangeably, but it looks like they’re considered separate programs at some universities. I’m trying to figure out which one I would be better suited for. As far as I understand it, political theorists tend deal with more empirical data and political philosophers have a more generalized and normative approach and often, as the name suggests, do more philosophy. But is that the extent of the differences? Is there anything else I should know when making my decision, like differences in the job market or competitiveness of admissions?
  5. For context, I am a political science/philosophy double major and German minor, and I intend on applying to political theory PhD programs this fall. The ones I’m most interested in are Notre Dame, Duke, Georgetown, U Chicago, Catholic University, and maybe Cambridge or another European university if I’ve got enough money to spare. My GRE scores are V: 162 Q: 156 A: 5.5. Most of the schools I listed above have slightly higher averages for verbal and quant, so I’m wondering if I should bite the bullet and retake the test. Thing is, I don’t have a lot of money to spend (especially since I’m saving up to pay for application fees), and my score is decent, so I’m wondering whether it’s worth investing the extra time (for studying) and money to take the test again. I won’t be hurting if I take the time and money to take it again, but it wouldn’t be ideal. For what it’s worth, the rest of my application should be decent to strong (lengthy list of extracurriculars, good LORs, 3.85 GPA, and -hopefully- a good writing sample). Any feedback is much appreciated!
  6. For context, I am a political science/philosophy double major and German minor, and I intend on applying to political theory PhD programs this fall. The ones I’m most interested in are Notre Dame, Duke, Georgetown, U Chicago, Catholic University, and maybe Cambridge or another European university if I’ve got enough money to spare. My GRE scores are V: 162 Q: 156 A: 5.5. Most of the schools I listed above have slightly higher averages for verbal and quant, so I’m wondering if I should bite the bullet and retake the test. Thing is, I don’t have a lot of money to spend (especially since I’m saving up to pay for application fees), and my score is decent, so I’m wondering whether it’s worth investing the extra time (for studying) and money to take the test again. I won’t be hurting if I take the time and money to take it again, but it wouldn’t be ideal. For what it’s worth, the rest of my application should be decent to strong (lengthy list of extracurriculars, good LORs, and -hopefully- a good writing sample). Any feedback is much appreciated!
  7. I’m a recent graduate who doubled in philosophy & political science, and I’m going to be applying to grad school this fall. I know “political theory” and “political philosophy” are sometimes used interchangeably, but it looks like they’re considered separate programs at some universities. I’m trying to figure out which one I would be better suited for. As far as I understand it, political theorists tend deal with more empirical data and political philosophers have a more generalized and normative approach and often, as the name suggests, do more philosophy. But is that the extent of the differences? Is there anything else I should know when making my decision, like differences in the job market or competitiveness of admissions?
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