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Florida Bachelor Level SLP


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Florida has a provision where someone with a CSD Bachelor's Degree can work in the public school as an SLP with a temporary license. The person then has 5 years to obtain a Master's Degree. 

Is anyone doing this right now? I'd like to know how much support/supervision you've gotten as a new graduate without the Master's level clinical experiences. 

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Hi Im currently a BA-SLP in the schools. The rule is actually that in 2 years you have to be accepted into a Master's program and then after that you have 5 years to complete your degree. I highly recommend it and I wholeheartedly believe the experience and knowledge I got from it helped me be a better candidate for graduate school. The amount of supervision varies by school district, but I was more than fortunate enough to have had a district that offered us more than enough supervision. My situation I have another SLP at my school other than me that has guided me. The district provided me with an SLP mentor. And there is a SLP specialist that Im supervised by who come and observes and gives me constructive criticism. There's always trainings for new information and everyone is more than willing to answer any and all questions. 

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Find out what school districts around you hire Bachelor's level. I'm from South Florida so I know Palm Beach County does and I believe so does Miami Dade. Broward doesn't. Orange County, Seminole County and Brevard County do. Hillsborough like Tampa area does not as far as I know. But things could have changed so check with them for sure. I contacted the ESE Department to find out who was in charge of hiring SLPs and reached out to them. Told them I had recently graduated and all that jazz and she scheduled an interview with me. I ended up going to a job fair the school district had in the summer time, mostly this is for teachers but she happened to be there and we actually did the job interview there. I was hired that day so be encouraged. They know you're bachelor's level so you have learning to do but definitely be knowledgeable about the basics of working in the field.  Hope this helps. If you have anymore questions lmk. 

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On 3/28/2019 at 11:49 AM, Qveeniz said:

Hi Im currently a BA-SLP in the schools. The rule is actually that in 2 years you have to be accepted into a Master's program and then after that you have 5 years to complete your degree. I highly recommend it and I wholeheartedly believe the experience and knowledge I got from it helped me be a better candidate for graduate school. The amount of supervision varies by school district, but I was more than fortunate enough to have had a district that offered us more than enough supervision. My situation I have another SLP at my school other than me that has guided me. The district provided me with an SLP mentor. And there is a SLP specialist that Im supervised by who come and observes and gives me constructive criticism. There's always trainings for new information and everyone is more than willing to answer any and all questions. 

Thank you for responding! That is exactly what I was hoping to know. I have been accepted to graduate school, so I will already be in school when/if I start. I’ve applied to the three counties around me. 

Are you in a graduate program now? Are you able to balance both? 

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1 hour ago, beemissi said:

Thank you for responding! That is exactly what I was hoping to know. I have been accepted to graduate school, so I will already be in school when/if I start. I’ve applied to the three counties around me. 

Are you in a graduate program now? Are you able to balance both? 

Glad I could help. I'm not in a graduate program right now but I was accepted to one. I know many BA-SLPs that have been able to handle the load. They say it's not easy but it's durable and our district was willing to work with them on scheduling, like if some only work 4 days a week. 

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On 4/4/2019 at 5:51 PM, Mikaela25 said:

I am currently doing this as well. I work for Duval County Public Schools in Jacksonville, FL. 

I’m interviewing with them next Friday! Can you tell me your about your experience? Do you have the option to work part time for Duval? Do you feel like you have fair mentorship? Are you in graduate school right now? 

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14 hours ago, beemissi said:

I’m interviewing with them next Friday! Can you tell me your about your experience? Do you have the option to work part time for Duval? Do you feel like you have fair mentorship? Are you in graduate school right now? 

You're interview will go great!! Is it with Molly or Heather? They're the sweetest so don't be nervous. You can't work part time because they have so many vacancies to fill, i'll be honest I was 100% overwhelmed when I started, but I'm a very organized person and I handled it. You get a district level mentor and mine was Heather and I still constantly email her with questions and ask for guidance. I also am very close with my SLP evaluator and she has helped me out a lot too. Just ask questions and get to know the staff at the school or schools you're at. You can do it? Add me on instagram (mikaela_marie25) I'll gladly answer anymore questions you have!

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On 3/27/2019 at 9:40 PM, beemissi said:

Florida has a provision where someone with a CSD Bachelor's Degree can work in the public school as an SLP with a temporary license. The person then has 5 years to obtain a Master's Degree. 

Is anyone doing this right now? I'd like to know how much support/supervision you've gotten as a new graduate without the Master's level clinical experiences. 

I completed my 2 years with the schools in May 2018 with Osceola County. Currently I work as an SLPA at a clinic and the workload is MUCH more manageable and I feel more comfortable in this position with just my bachelors degree. I chose to let my certificate with the schools expire because my school had an intense caseload and I was barely staying afloat with the workload (I did not have sufficient planning time at work because I was in therapy back to back ALL day, my "planning days" were full of unnecessarily long IEP meetings and I would never have a chance to catch up on testing students or writing reports, had to do ALL report writing at home). I don't regret my experience at all because it has made me a better clinician and I feel confident applying to grad school now but I recommend asking the right questions before accepting a position at a school. Ask what the caseload looks like (number of students and types of disabilities you will be working with). Also if you aren't comfortable at a school due to whatever reason simply ask to be moved to a different school for the next school year. Or ask if it is possible to be split part-time at two schools (working with 2 full-time SLP's). I have friends in Orange County and they seem to have lower caseloads and better experiences as bachelor level SLPs so do not be deterred due to my experience. You just need to advocate for yourself.

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