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Hi Guys,

I posted my question elsewhere but it hasn't been answered. I'm wondering where I can find practice tests for the English Literature Subject test. I have the Princeton Review (somehow I feel like it isn't very good), the ETS practice test I lifted from the ETS website, and the ETS practice test I received in the mail. If you know of any other places I can find samples--preferably on the internet and preferably for free--let me know!

Thanks so much,

e

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There is an ETS book you can buy with 3 prior actual tests, but I found that all the tests, including princeton's, the online test, and the prior tests to be nothing compared to the real thing. I received much higher scores on the practice tests than I did on the real test, and there were way more classical mythology questions on the practice tests and almost no theory questions. Because of the sparsity of practice tests available I would recommend buying the ETS book (it's not too expensive) but bewarned that it will not be like the real test.

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Hi Guys,

I posted my question elsewhere but it hasn't been answered. I'm wondering where I can find practice tests for the English Literature Subject test. I have the Princeton Review (somehow I feel like it isn't very good), the ETS practice test I lifted from the ETS website, and the ETS practice test I received in the mail. If you know of any other places I can find samples--preferably on the internet and preferably for free--let me know!

Thanks so much,

e

I think the reason no one has answered is because none of us really has an answer. I used the Princeton and ETS practice tests, and so did everyone I've spoken to here. The problem, of course, being that no practice test out there has really been like the actual test, from all accounts.

You can try looking for used copies of older review books for different sample tests, perhaps; they won't have some of the newer questions but practice taking a subject test is practice taking a subject test when it comes to standard format and style of questions.

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Hi Guys,

I posted my question elsewhere but it hasn't been answered. I'm wondering where I can find practice tests for the English Literature Subject test. I have the Princeton Review (somehow I feel like it isn't very good), the ETS practice test I lifted from the ETS website, and the ETS practice test I received in the mail. If you know of any other places I can find samples--preferably on the internet and preferably for free--let me know!

Thanks so much,

e

Not a practice test, but I found that M.H. Abram's Glossary of Literary Terms was incredibly useful as a general review tool for the subject test. If you don't already have it, I'd strongly suggest buying it--the discussions of the various literary periods are especially helpful. (I ended up with a 770, and the vast majority of my studying was with that text.)

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Not a practice test, but I found that M.H. Abram's Glossary of Literary Terms was incredibly useful as a general review tool for the subject test. If you don't already have it, I'd strongly suggest buying it--the discussions of the various literary periods are especially helpful. (I ended up with a 770, and the vast majority of my studying was with that text.)

RJ - did you find a cheaper copy of Abrams The lowest I'm seeing on Amazon is 30.00. Not bad, as far as academic books go, but cheaper is always better...! :P

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There is an ETS book you can buy with 3 prior actual tests, but I found that all the tests, including princeton's, the online test, and the prior tests to be nothing compared to the real thing. I received much higher scores on the practice tests than I did on the real test, and there were way more classical mythology questions on the practice tests and almost no theory questions. Because of the sparsity of practice tests available I would recommend buying the ETS book (it's not too expensive) but bewarned that it will not be like the real test.

Thanks for letting me know about the ETS book. I think the problem with being in Canada is that there's a general ignorance surrounding the GRE. My professors have been as helpful as they can be, but of course, they wrote the GRE years and years ago.

I've heard that there are more theory questions on the test lately, is that true? Also, what about modern stuff? Is there more on that these days?

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Not a practice test, but I found that M.H. Abram's Glossary of Literary Terms was incredibly useful as a general review tool for the subject test. If you don't already have it, I'd strongly suggest buying it--the discussions of the various literary periods are especially helpful. (I ended up with a 770, and the vast majority of my studying was with that text.)

Already have M.H. Abrams on my side. We're a power couple.

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Thanks for letting me know about the ETS book. I think the problem with being in Canada is that there's a general ignorance surrounding the GRE. My professors have been as helpful as they can be, but of course, they wrote the GRE years and years ago.

I've heard that there are more theory questions on the test lately, is that true? Also, what about modern stuff? Is there more on that these days?

Yes. the last set of tests apparently had several questions on modern American poetry and African-American fiction, as well as several questions on theory and literary criticism.

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I know you're specifically asking for practice tests here, but have you tried any online study guides like Vade Mecum? I can't emember the other subject test guide I was using, but the Vade Mecum at least gives you a sense of the frequency with which authors, poems, and theorists show up on the test. I tried to tailor my studying (which included snippets from that site, other sites, and my Norton Anthology) to the authors that he spoke of as showing up frequently, and I feel like it definitely strengthened my performance.

Like everyone else is saying on here, the practice tests all have different biases-- too much mythology, not enough theory, more modern stuff etc etc. You'll find that with the actual tests too, somewhat, because not everyone in every round takes the same test. There are at least two versions that go out, maybe more. Mine seemed to have a preponderence of questions that required a knowledge of the Bible, which was probably my biggest trip-up on the physical test after theory. The areas that I *knew* were going to be weak, English poets and dramatists, were the areas that concerned me the most going into the studying process. Have you ever looked at the Norton Anthology from the first Medieval book through all the other eras to the present? Just sheer size and weight of the books tells you that there's a more to know once you get into those middle to later books. I felt like the Medieval lit was a piece of cake, and then I bogged down halfway through the Renaissance. Restoration and 18th century seemed like impenetrable walls of names I didn't know or care about. There is just TOO MUCH to sort through, and that's where Vade Mecum came in handy, by doing some intelligent sorting fo rme.

Anyway, looking back, I'd say that it's the study aid that helped me the most to bring my other weak spots up to fighting weight. Practice tests might get you comfortable with wording and with format, but don't get lulled into a false sense of security in terms of subject matter.

Edited for clarity.

Edited by poco_puffs
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RJ - did you find a cheaper copy of Abrams The lowest I'm seeing on Amazon is 30.00. Not bad, as far as academic books go, but cheaper is always better...! :P

MM--there are lots of used copies on bookfinder.com for under $5, mostly earlier editions; I wouldn't go for the 1981 version, but there's a lot in between.

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Wow, thanks for that lengthy replay. I write the Subject Test this Saturday (the 9th). Wish I knew about this earlier. Damnit. The more you know, the more you realize you don't know. sigh.....

I know you're specifically asking for practice tests here, but have you tried any online study guides like Vade Mecum? I can't emember the other subject test guide I was using, but the Vade Mecum at least gives you a sense of the frequency with which authors, poems, and theorists show up on the test. I tried to tailor my studying (which included snippets from that site, other sites, and my Norton Anthology) to the authors that he spoke of as showing up frequently, and I feel like it definitely strengthened my performance.

Like everyone else is saying on here, the practice tests all have different biases-- too much mythology, not enough theory, more modern stuff etc etc. You'll find that with the actual tests too, somewhat, because not everyone in every round takes the same test. There are at least two versions that go out, maybe more. Mine seemed to have a preponderence of questions that required a knowledge of the Bible, which was probably my biggest trip-up on the physical test after theory. The areas that I *knew* were going to be weak, English poets and dramatists, were the areas that concerned me the most going into the studying process. Have you ever looked at the Norton Anthology from the first Medieval book through all the other eras to the present? Just sheer size and weight of the books tells you that there's a more to know once you get into those middle to later books. I felt like the Medieval lit was a piece of cake, and then I bogged down halfway through the Renaissance. Restoration and 18th century seemed like impenetrable walls of names I didn't know or care about. There is just TOO MUCH to sort through, and that's where Vade Mecum came in handy, by doing some intelligent sorting fo rme.

Anyway, looking back, I'd say that it's the study aid that helped me the most to bring my other weak spots up to fighting weight. Practice tests might get you comfortable with wording and with format, but don't get lulled into a false sense of security in terms of subject matter.

Edited for clarity.

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