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Medievalmaniac

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Everything posted by Medievalmaniac

  1. hazelbite - I HATE theory. I do literature. But lately it is really hard to publish without a recognizably theoretical framework for your argument. Ergo, I am doing enough theory to publish my thinking. I think a lot of us are in that particular boat...
  2. If you check my blog here at gradcafe, I posted my SOP in its many forms and explained what was wrong with each of the earlier versions and what worked on the final one:
  3. OK, well then we will give it a try and see what blogging the first year here looks like. If it gets overwhelming or no one seems to really want to read about it, I'll just scale back to maintaining my regular blog; worth a try if it will help/encourage/entertain anyone.
  4. Nobody here but us Lit Majors trying to figure out this theory thing! lol At least it's postcolonialism, which makes some sense. Poststructuralism, anyone?
  5. Yes, FINALLY starting. I got a clean bill of health in May - remission, Baby! I can toss out some titles, although I think many/most are more from the late 20th century - still, it's a start, right? lol the Empire Writes Back Ahmad, In Theory Anderson, Imagined Communities Bhabha, The Location of Culture Chakrabarty, Provincializing Europe Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth Gilroy, The Black Atlantic Said, Orientalism Lunsford and Ouzgane, Crossing Borderlands Spivak, A Critique of Postcolonial Reason Sinha Animal's People Coetzee Disgrace Ondaatje's Anil's Ghost. Seth, A
  6. Grades matter for funding, but you generally have to maintain a "B" average. A "B+" is a 3.3 at your institution, so as long as your other grades are "A"s I would not worry too much about that aspect of your situation. What I would do, especially since you seem to be a little upset by this grade, is to go in and speak with the professor. The conversation should not be a "why did I only get a B+" or a "comparison of this B+ to all my other A grades" sort of deal, but rather, "can you tell me a little about what you see as my weaknesses as a student, and maybe give me some pointers to improve
  7. My current work email includes my name, most recent degree, position and school, which provides credential snapshots - I use it for conference activity, abstract submission, and other scholarly activity, and also college admissions stuff (I teach at a high school) along with the requisite 79-word disclaimer message. My personal email includes my favorite quote du jour and a link to my blog, since I'm also a writer. I love quotes, unlike the folks above me. My university email will include my immediate contact information, modeled on the signatures of the professors on all the listservs I belo
  8. Hey, gradcafe! I'm pulling a King Arthur move showing up after so long, but nice to pop in and see you good folks! :o)

  9. OK, I lied. I actually start TA orientation on August 6. FINALLY! What a long, strange journey this has been. First, the application season-that-wasn't. Then, the application season that ended in a fully-funded offer from a perfect-fit school. Followed almost immediately by the cancer diagnosis. Followed by the year of chemo and radiation. Followed (most thankfully) by remission. And now, after a full decade of starts and stops, I'm finally doing this. I've given notice at the school I've been teaching at for the past decade. I'm registered for classes. I have my funding package. We'r
  10. I'm reading the books on my Postcolonialisms syllabus, and the texts for the comp TAs, to get a head start on the semester. I'm also working on Latin, Welsh, and Old Norse Icelandic, reading several titles in Arthuriana, and working on two articles I'm submitting in July and August, respectively. And teaching full time, 6 classes a day. Never a dull moment!
  11. I have a professor who did a double PhD in English and Writing, so it isn't entirely unheard of - although it is a LOT of work. I would check with the departments you are applying to to see what their particular regulations are.
  12. The #JustOneMore initiative- guaranteed to get you obsessing over something besides your acceptance letters, at least temporarily!:

    1. contretemps

      contretemps

      #justonemore hour of obsessing and lurking in gradcafe!! haha, kidding. ;)

    2. Medievalmaniac

      Medievalmaniac

      #JustOneMore hour of networking with your future co-grad students, fellow job hunters, and conference goers! - very worthwhile use of time! :o)

  13. I'm glad you enjoyed it! Consider participating in #JustOneMore - what have you got to lose?
  14. (This is cross-posted from my wordpress blog, which is my main posting spot: http://caridwen.wordpress.com/) OK, here we go…. the #JustOneMore movement. It’s here. It’s time. Time to let go of our fears and worries that we will never be enough or do enough. Time to let go of that niggly feeling that we should/could/might/ought to be doing more. Time to go from the intention to up the ante, to actually upping the ante. Time to let go of the side of the pool and start swimming in the deep end (with floaties. Because I don’t want to be responsible for anyone’s drowning, even metaph
  15. Thank you so much for visiting, reading and commenting! I appreciate your support, and of course, I support you right back! Best of luck in finals and wow - here comes a break! Who's hitting the library for a research bender along with me? )
  16. I think you ought to re-apply to the school the waitlisted you and told you "any other year...", especially when they made it a point to tell you you had champions in their department. I know if it were me, I would certainly re-apply to that department.
  17. I second Poeeter and Bespeckled. I blogged about the changes to the test last November when I took it - check my gradcafe blog for the post. the prep materials on the subject test website were quite misleading - it WAS much more reading comprehension with full-page passages attached to 6-8 questions, and there were only a handful of identifications. ALSO, it was heavy on the socio-political connections (what major event was going on when the following passage was written"? - this type of question was very prevalent in the reading comp. sections. Reading the Norton Anthology introductory secti
  18. You don't request a certain amount. You have to fill out the financial aid form, and check the box for financial aid on the application. At that point it is at the department and graduate school's discretion to award or not to award merit-based fellowship funding available in-school. It is your responsibility to check into and apply for outside funding via national fellowship and scholarship programs - there's a thread for that on the forum. i hope that clears up your question?
  19. Point of clarification: Emerita CAN teach courses and they CAN serve on dissertation committees. Their role in the department really depends on the school they are at. At some schools, they can only serve on the dissertation committee as non academic council members, on others, they can count as academic/faculty members. At some schools they can teach graduate level courses; at others only undergraduate and general ed. courses, and at still others they give a seminar once in a while or do not take on further teaching responsibilities. They generally can NOT serve as dissertation advisers, beca
  20. I was shut out my first year of applying, and everyone was shocked (4.0, perfect GRE essay, 89th percentile English, publications, stellar recommendations and teaching experience). My second year applying I applied to two schools and was accepted full funding to the one I interviewed at - and it is not a top school, but it is the best possible placement for me. Then I got cancer and had to defer enrollment. Anxiety didn't do me any good through any of that - but I felt it keenly all the way through both application seasons, and was riddled with doubt and insecurity even after I was accepted. H
  21. R&R is great! Well done. But, make sure you DO R&R - try to get it turned around within 3-4 weeks. firstly, because it ensures you don't set it aside and then forget to do it, secondly, because their comments and your work on it is still fresh in your mind, and thirdly because it demonstrates your professionalism - they will remember that if you submit in future even if this article ultimately ends up rejected. For your first question, it's usually a good idea to wait between 2-3 months before inquiring about an article's status at most journals, because as others have said the peer
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