Jump to content

telling one school about another's funding


Recommended Posts

Hi all- I am not sure if this is the appropriate forum to post this in, and if not, I will move it to the Decisions, Decisions one. The reason why I put this here is because I thought it would be best to get advice from people who are either in or applying to literature. I'm just guessing the answer might change from field to field.

Having said that-- I have two acceptances, one from school A, which is my top choice, and another from school B, which I am nevertheless quite interested in. School A said two weeks ago that they will be sending information on finances later. I haven't heard back from them yet. School B gave me a very good 5 year fellowship.

Do you think it is a good idea to send school A a polite email and tell them about School B and its funding offer? How do you think I should word this?

If you think this is a bad idea, do you think it would still be OK to contact School A and ask when they think they can get back to me about finances?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say school B already got back to me and you haven't...that will probably give off the wrong impression. Asking when funding packages would be offered is fine. Unless program A gave you a specific date or timeframe, asking is not a 'bad' idea. Keep in mind that those offers do have an expiration date, but the dates are probably a little ways off.

Edited by lolopixie
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, lolopixie and TheOtherJake! I think I'll follow the advice. I'll email school A and ask them when they think they can let me know about funding. My own instinct in this was to keep school B out of it, but a few people had told me I should definitely bring school B up. It doesn't leave a good taste in my mouth somehow, so I thought I should ask more people for opinions. I guess you two think the same as I do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll be the dissenter and say that it's not necessarily bad to mention your other offers. Schools regularly compete to enroll the students they admit, and I've definitely heard of cases where stipends will be increased or packages improved in order to be competitive with other offers you have. But don't do it so early, before you've probably heard decisions from all your schools, and certainly not before you've heard what School A is actually offering you.

Also something to keep in mind: if School A gives you a livable stipend but you know others are not guaranteed funding...I might feel not so great about pushing for more. It should be about livability, not just because you were offered more at another place. But if School A gives you a package that had unfunded years or something like that, I would definitely mention other offers to see if there is room for negotiation. Don't do it just to see if you can get more money - too politically risky, aside from being kind of sketchy in general.

And yes, you should be tactful when and if you do it, and only do it if it's reasonable request. But don't jump the gun. Be patient and see what they offer you first, because it might not even be necessary to bargain. And you you should try to avoid bargaining if you can. Plenty of time before April 15.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll be the dissenter and say that it's not necessarily bad to mention your other offers. Schools regularly compete to enroll the students they admit, and I've definitely heard of cases where stipends will be increased or packages improved in order to be competitive with other offers you have. But don't do it so early, before you've probably heard decisions from all your schools, and certainly not before you've heard what School A is actually offering you.

Also something to keep in mind: if School A gives you a livable stipend but you know others are not guaranteed funding...I might feel not so great about pushing for more. It should be about livability, not just because you were offered more at another place. But if School A gives you a package that had unfunded years or something like that, I would definitely mention other offers to see if there is room for negotiation. Don't do it just to see if you can get more money - too politically risky, aside from being kind of sketchy in general.

And yes, you should be tactful when and if you do it, and only do it if it's reasonable request. But don't jump the gun. Be patient and see what they offer you first, because it might not even be necessary to bargain. And you you should try to avoid bargaining if you can. Plenty of time before April 15.

This is super useful and very well put, thank you very much!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree with intextrovert too. I do think you should wait to see what you get first -- maybe an informal call to School A to see when they think funding decisions will be made.

For what it's worth, the grad director of a program I was accepted to brought up that I should feel free to reach out regarding other schools' offers, and that I shouldn't feel weird about doing it, they would try to be flexible and definitely receptive to listening. I think if you're honest and forthright, you can't go wrong -- everyone understands the position you're in! I think trying to be vague or leaving information out possibly leaves you open to not getting all your questions answered.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have another question.. what about telling schools about another's offer of rejection? I'm imagining I will have no acceptances—does it look too desperate to say, "I didn't get get any offers anywhere, please take me off your waitlist?" Haha.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have another question.. what about telling schools about another's offer of rejection? I'm imagining I will have no acceptances—does it look too desperate to say, "I didn't get get any offers anywhere, please take me off your waitlist?" Haha.

Hmm...instinct says I wouldn't. I think stating outright, "Hey, guys, I'm striking out!" might do you more harm than good; however, if you tactfully say, "When do you usually notify those of us who are wait-listed? I'm considering all of my options," you might get a response that could be at least a little helpful. Keep in mind that wait-lists are there to fill in any spaces that open up from students who choose not to accept an offer, so the schools are waiting on those students, just as you are waiting on the schools. In the meantime, I'd poke around gradcafe and see if anyone that's been accepted at the schools you're wait-listed from seems to be declining offers-- personally, that would drive me even more insane, but I know sometimes it's just about keeping yourself busy and feeling like you're being proactive while you wait.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. See our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use