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Nonresident Aliens, resident aliens...


Strangefox
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Anybody, please help me decipher this! :wacko:

What Does Nonresident Alien Mean?

A non-U.S. citizen who doesn't pass the green card test or the substantial presence test. If a non-citizen currently has a green card or has had a green card in the past calender year, he or she would pass the green card test and would be classified as a resident alien. If the individual has resided in the U.S. for more than 31 days in the current year and has resided in the U.S. for more than 183 days over a three-year period, including the current year, he or she would pass the substantial presence test and also be classified as a resident alien.

So when I come to the US on F-1 visa, first I am a nonresident alien, but then I will become a resident alien?? When will I become a resident alien?? After 3 years?? But I will still be on F-1 visa. So the visa will be the same but my status will be slightly different??

Sorry, I am so confused by all these rules!

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If you are a student with an F-1 visa, then that is what you are. A student studying in the USA. You cannot have a normal 'job' other than 20hours per week on campus with the F-1. You don't have to worry about all this other terminology. If you are interested in becoming a resident or working longer in the USA after your school is over, that is when you will have to worry about these terms. The school you are attending should have an international department and I'm sure they would be able to help you out when the time comes to figure out your next step after schooling (assuming you want to try and stay in the USA).

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If you are a student with an F-1 visa, then that is what you are. A student studying in the USA. You cannot have a normal 'job' other than 20hours per week on campus with the F-1. You don't have to worry about all this other terminology. If you are interested in becoming a resident or working longer in the USA after your school is over, that is when you will have to worry about these terms. The school you are attending should have an international department and I'm sure they would be able to help you out when the time comes to figure out your next step after schooling (assuming you want to try and stay in the USA).

Actually I am asking because of taxes. This resident/nonresident alien thing appears to matter in this case.

Payments of scholarships, fellowships, and grants paid to U.S. citizens and resident aliens are not generally reportable to the IRS and are not generally subject to withholding of tax. However, payments of taxable scholarships, fellowships, and grants to nonresident aliens are generally reportable to the IRS and are generally subject to withholding of U.S. Federal income tax.

And I am trying to understand how much I will have to pay off my fellowship because I am starting to look for an apartment and I need to know how much I will have after taxes.

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Actually I am asking because of taxes. This resident/nonresident alien thing appears to matter in this case.

Payments of scholarships, fellowships, and grants paid to U.S. citizens and resident aliens are not generally reportable to the IRS and are not generally subject to withholding of tax. However, payments of taxable scholarships, fellowships, and grants to nonresident aliens are generally reportable to the IRS and are generally subject to withholding of U.S. Federal income tax.

And I am trying to understand how much I will have to pay off my fellowship because I am starting to look for an apartment and I need to know how much I will have after taxes.

You would be exempt if you are spending the money on school related things (tuition, books etc.) if you get the money from a US source such as your school. You would only be taxed if you start using the money for housing and other non-school related items.

Edited by squaresquared
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You would be exempt if you are spending the money on school related things (tuition, books etc.) if you get the money from a US source such as your school. You would only be taxed if you start using the money for housing and other non-school related items.

I see. And the federal tax will be 14% in my case, right?

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