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Top notch religious studies programs that offer archeological education?


belichick

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Well, obviously Harvard. Their Semitic museum normally funds a number of different projects. Right now, they have been re-digging in Ashkelon with the Leon Levy expedition. It's co-run by Dan Masters (from Wheaton) and Lawrence Stager.

 

UT-Austin is a new up and coming program. Both L. Michael White and Steve Friesen in their AMR concentration are pretty heavily involved in digs every summer, and I'd keep an eye for this school in years to come for sure.

Other than that, I could almost gurantee that any top notch program (Duke, Emory, UChicago, etc.) will have connections and ties to excavators.

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Well, obviously Harvard. Their Semitic museum normally funds a number of different projects. Right now, they have been re-digging in Ashkelon with the Leon Levy expedition. It's co-run by Dan Masters (from Wheaton) and Lawrence Stager.

 

UT-Austin is a new up and coming program. Both L. Michael White and Steve Friesen in their AMR concentration are pretty heavily involved in digs every summer, and I'd keep an eye for this school in years to come for sure.

Other than that, I could almost gurantee that any top notch program (Duke, Emory, UChicago, etc.) will have connections and ties to excavators.

 

Prof. Stager just retired. So no classes available at Harvard at present. Things may change in the next few years but...they have not done much to replace Huehnergard, so...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Any thoughts on good programs that offer solid theoretical/historical training AND offer archaeological training?

As always, it depends on where your interests are. But, if you're interested in the ancient Judaism side, UCLA would be an excellent place to consider. Schniedewind is top notch in Hebrew Bible, DSS, and ancient Judaism. Boustan in ancient Judaism is also very good. They have multiple connections to digs in West Asia, especially the cultural heritage project at Jaffa, of which Aaron Burke is a co-director. UCLA, unlike most of the other UCs, generally won't accept students they cannot fund (at least in the NELC dept), which is a bit of a double edged sword (if you get in you get funding, but they don't take many students). Also, UCLA has an excellent reputation, especially in the western half of the US, where there is much less NE/Ivy bias (which is another conversation entirely).

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