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How many Pre SLP classes do you recommend per semester?


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How many Pre SLP classes should I take per semester?  Would really like to knock out as many as possible before I apply to grad schools in January.  Should I take (2) 8 week courses per 8 weeks?  Or (2) 16 week classes or (3) 16 week classes per semester?  I've been hearing that students don't do as well overall in 8 week courses.  I should add that I have an almost 2 year old son and a part time job.  How many classes per semester do you honestly suggest is manageable??

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This is my first time posting in this forum. I was just lurking. o_O

I go to UH, and as an undergrad, we are only allowed to take two per semester. So 2 in the Fall, 2 in the Spring, and they just now made taking 2 in the summer an option for COMD (Communication sciences and disorders) majors. Before, UH never offered summer classes for COMD majors, unless you were in grad school or doing your 4000 level course (senior courses).

Two per semester seems managable for you, (2) 16 week classes. 3 seems a bit overwhelming, but thats just me. My classes consist of mothers, people with part/full time jobs, and all types of superman like people.

I'm doing summer school as well for COMD classes. And it's 8 wks, and I'm dying! Lol, you could probably do better than me!

Sorry for being so wordy.

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It really depends on your learning style, life priorities, organization and time management skills. I like to spread out and sleep on the information so I always go for the full semester. I also know that if I work more than 10 hours a week, my learning takes a beating which I learned the hard way back in my freshman year.

 

Typically, you should be spending at 12 hours a week (at least) for 1 course (3 hours for preparation, 9 hours to review and master the content).

 

Also, are you taking the courses on campus or online? If on campus you may want to factor traveling time round trip in there too.

 

Here's a possible schedule for you if you're taking 3 courses. I filled in sleep and possible time spent per course (2 hours per course) See if you can fit all the activities in 24 hours.

 

Coursework:  6

Meals: 

Hygiene: 

Errands/chores: 

Exercise or Family time: 

Transportation: 

Part-time work: 

Sleep:  8

_____________

Total:  24

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I would definitely go the full semester option.  I worked 50-60+ hours a week and took two and I felt it was pretty manageable.  I would suggest taking two if it's your first semester. You can always readjust and take more courses in subsequent semesters.

 

Also, just so you're aware, I only had two COMD classes completed at the time I applied to grad school and it was fine.  I just made the grad schools aware that all my pre-reqs would be completed by the time I started school in the fall.

 

Hope this helps. :)

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It really depends on your learning style, life priorities, organization and time management skills. I like to spread out and sleep on the information so I always go for the full semester. I also know that if I work more than 10 hours a week, my learning takes a beating which I learned the hard way back in my freshman year.

 

Typically, you should be spending at 12 hours a week (at least) for 1 course (3 hours for preparation, 9 hours to review and master the content).

 

Also, are you taking the courses on campus or online? If on campus you may want to factor traveling time round trip in there too.

 

Here's a possible schedule for you if you're taking 3 courses. I filled in sleep and possible time spent per course (2 hours per course) See if you can fit all the activities in 24 hours.

 

Coursework:  6

Meals: 

Hygiene: 

Errands/chores: 

Exercise or Family time: 

Transportation: 

Part-time work: 

Sleep:  8

_____________

Total:  24

I will be taking courses online.  I love your schedule above.  Based on your schedule above, I should be ok with 3 courses.  I could always sign up for 3 and then withdraw 1 of them if I feel its too much, correct?

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I would definitely go the full semester option.  I worked 50-60+ hours a week and took two and I felt it was pretty manageable.  I would suggest taking two if it's your first semester. You can always readjust and take more courses in subsequent semesters.

 

Also, just so you're aware, I only had two COMD classes completed at the time I applied to grad school and it was fine.  I just made the grad schools aware that all my pre-reqs would be completed by the time I started school in the fall.

 

Hope this helps. :)

So, you were able to complete all your prereqs before grad school started, it sounds like?  May I ask how many total prereqs you needed for your grad school?  I'm thinking 3 classes is manageable if you could do 2 on a 50-60+ hr work schedule.  I don't work NEARLY that much.  Good for you, really impressive!

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So, you were able to complete all your prereqs before grad school started, it sounds like?  May I ask how many total prereqs you needed for your grad school?  I'm thinking 3 classes is manageable if you could do 2 on a 50-60+ hr work schedule.  I don't work NEARLY that much.  Good for you, really impressive!

 

Thanks!!

 

Yes, I have been able to complete all my pre-reqs (grad school starts in the fall). :)  I began taking classes last fall and, like I said, I took two courses.  My husband had just graduated grad school and found a job during my first semester.  I was fortunate that his job paid enough to provide for both of us, so I quit my job in December to focus solely on school.  I then took five courses during the spring semester since I was planning to complete USU's 2nd Bachelor's program which has 12 course requirements.  My plan was to take the final five courses during the summer semester.  However, once I accepted a place at SIUE's grad school, I found out they didn't need all the courses I was planning to take over the summer.  So, I only ended up taking three courses this summer.  That's ten courses total.

 

I ended up taking more courses than I actually needed because I was unsure of where I would attend school.  I only needed 8 of the 10 courses I took.  However, I had to take the others to cover my bases since I applied to a large number of schools that each had different pre-req requirements.

 

Let me know if you have any other questions!!

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I started a post-bacc program last summer and was able to complete the program in one year and now I will be attending graduate school in August! I worked part-time and took 3 courses per semester (3 in the summer, 3 in the fall, and 3 in the spring). When I applied to grad school I had completed 6 speech courses and felt that this was helpful because it showed the admissions committees that I could excel in these types of classes. I felt that taking 3 courses and working part-time was very manageable. I still had time to relax! I only found the summer courses more difficult because they were shorter (about half a semester instead of a full semester) and I took anatomy and physiology that semester which required a lot of memorization in such a small time period. 

 

Like I said, 3 courses worked well for me but I think it depends on what type of learner you are and what personal priorities you have! 

 

On a side note - I would research the programs you are looking to attend. Some programs may require that you have taken a certain number of credits in speech courses before applying. Also, different programs require different pre-req courses so watch out for that as well!

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I will be taking courses online.  I love your schedule above.  Based on your schedule above, I should be ok with 3 courses.  I could always sign up for 3 and then withdraw 1 of them if I feel its too much, correct?

 

Absolutely. Know your limits so you don't burn out.  Since you mentioned online, if you haven't taken any before, the material is a lot heavier since you have the advantage of replaying the lectures unlike on campus students so it's good to pace yourself. If you're a visual learner, try to rally up some of your classmates if they're interested in transcribing lectures to save time and support each other. It can get pretty isolating. Remember to ask lots and lots of questions to your Prof or TA's. Also, if you can, try to find a SLP or an ENT or your PCP (for anatomy) who you can consult as a resource if you're not sure of anything relating to your courses (speech anatomy, articulation, procedures etc.).

Edited by Patont
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