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"Cheap" MBA @ no-name uni w/ intern OR LSE Msc SocPol/Dev?


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I've been admitted to two programs: one is an MBA programme at small, private school in the UK with virtually no name, but allows me to work full time for a corporate firm and is rather "cheap" comparatively.

However, I have also been accepted to LSE's Social Policy & Development programme at about $24,035 tuition a year.

Which, given the finances, degree type and name, would you choose in terms of landing you better job prospects?

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Ask people in the kind of business you want to get into how much name recognition of the school you get your MBA at matters, and if the more recognizable name would help you. I would think the answer would be yes, the more expensive program would help you more, but I'm not in business, nor am in in the UK.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've been admitted to two programs: one is an MBA programme at small, private school in the UK with virtually no name, but allows me to work full time for a corporate firm and is rather "cheap" comparatively.

However, I have also been accepted to LSE's Social Policy & Development programme at about $24,035 tuition a year.

Which, given the finances, degree type and name, would you choose in terms of landing you better job prospects?

As a research student and teacher at the LSE, I can say emphatically: don't come here. The student population has literally doubled in the past few years, whereas all the resources have barely increased. The survey and results that take this recent data are still coming in, and within a few years the reputation will not be nearly as high. It also makes the experience here quite frustrating--it is nearly impossible to get a hold of professors or administrators, and there isn't room for the second-year econ research students to have a desk on campus. For holding office hours, they actually suggested the overcrowded on-campus coffeeshop. You are buying a piece of paper if you come here, and it won't take long for the rest of the world to figure out that is all the LSE is selling now.

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  • 2 weeks later...

As a research student and teacher at the LSE, I can say emphatically: don't come here. The student population has literally doubled in the past few years, whereas all the resources have barely increased. The survey and results that take this recent data are still coming in, and within a few years the reputation will not be nearly as high. It also makes the experience here quite frustrating--it is nearly impossible to get a hold of professors or administrators, and there isn't room for the second-year econ research students to have a desk on campus. For holding office hours, they actually suggested the overcrowded on-campus coffeeshop. You are buying a piece of paper if you come here, and it won't take long for the rest of the world to figure out that is all the LSE is selling now.

I believe the man may have, with his chilling review, told you all you need to know.

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As a research student and teacher at the LSE, I can say emphatically: don't come here. The student population has literally doubled in the past few years, whereas all the resources have barely increased. The survey and results that take this recent data are still coming in, and within a few years the reputation will not be nearly as high. It also makes the experience here quite frustrating--it is nearly impossible to get a hold of professors or administrators, and there isn't room for the second-year econ research students to have a desk on campus. For holding office hours, they actually suggested the overcrowded on-campus coffeeshop. You are buying a piece of paper if you come here, and it won't take long for the rest of the world to figure out that is all the LSE is selling now.

This is a pretty accurate comment that can also be applied to many other universities in the UK.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have to agree with Jacob's assessment. I was as masters student at LSE in the same department you are considering. I had a fabulous time at LSE and I found the quality of my education to be quite high. That being said, however, the facilities are very cramped, there are no 'perks' (TAships, office space, etc.) for masters students because there are so many of them and you are treated like an undergrad. I can't speak for conditions at other UK universities, but I had always thought that an MBA carried more weight in business than a MSc in politics so I would probably go for the MBA.

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  • 5 weeks later...

I'd agree with many of the comments about the LSE. It has a fantastic reputation that might get you something, but as a school, it is not spectacular. Regardless, I think the bigger question is: what exactly are you looking to do? A Msc in SocPol/Dev is an entirely different degree than an MBA and will push you in a different direction.

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