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LMSW with Mindfulness Focus


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I would complete my MSW and seek a DBT certification. Alternatively schools like Columbia, Smith, DePaul, Loyola, Aurora, University at Buffalo, and UC San Diego all have faculty that specialize in mindfulness training/practice. I would recommend reading through the faculty pages at schools you're interested in to see whether any of their instructors share your interests.

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2 hours ago, optimistickie said:

I would complete my MSW and seek a DBT certification. Alternatively schools like Columbia, Smith, DePaul, Loyola, Aurora, University at Buffalo, and UC San Diego all have faculty that specialize in mindfulness training/practice. I would recommend reading through the faculty pages at schools you're interested in to see whether any of their instructors share your interests.

Very helpful info - thank you!! What is the difference between MSW + DBT certification and LMSW - do they both give licensure? Why prefer the first? What are the best universities to consider (including online)? You mentioned that Columbia/Buffalo have mindfulness training/practice - is that a part of the MSW curriculum? I am also trying to find out resources on the actual curricula taught in MSW/LMSW - any websites you recommend? Thank you so much in advance!

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A certificate in DBT is just an additional certification/specialization that a mental health or in this case MSW clinician can receive.  Typically one receives their MSW and then takes their licensing exam after graduation to become an LMSW, which is basically a license to practice under supervision. Then from after receiving the LMSW you can become a LCSW; in order to receive this credential in NY you need 3000 hours of supervision within a minimum 3 year time frame and you have to take your clinical licensing exam.  From the LCSW you can become a LCSW-R by obtaining 6 years of post graduate supervision.

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Yes, LMSW is not a degree. it's a post-MSW license :) Although in some states it's "Graduate" or "Associate" instead of "Masters"

Edited by orangeycat
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Thanks! I am hearing that certain programs have less of a "clinical" focus than others. I also see a huge variance in tuition cost. Is it worth the investment in a more "clinical" program? Also what is the tangible difference between the curricula of a "clinically" focused vs. a less clinical program?

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Couple more questions: 1) how many programs do you recommend applying to? 2) any recommendations on what increases the odds of getting selected (e.g. social work experience etc.)? Thanks!

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Western Michigan University has a MSW program with several optional specializations including Integrative Holistic Health and Wellness. There are several classes that focus solely on mindfulness. I applied for the MSW program, and have been taking the holistic health classes for a year now. I absolutely love them. 

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