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RedPill

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About RedPill

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    Double Shot

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  • Application Season
    2013 Spring

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  1. I'd use Mendeley for an academic paper, but this book is geared towards general/policy audiences. We cite a number reports, websites and federally maintained information. I'll need to use an online generator since the sources are so varied. Can't download most of them.
  2. I'm working as a research assistant on a book where I'm doing a good deal of fact checking and updating footnotes, references, citations etc (Chicago style) Does anyone know the preferred citation generator for this type of work? Probably those of you in the social sciences/editing are more familiar with this line of work. I know there are a bunch out there (citationmachine, easybib etc.) I've been using Bibme, but I'm wondering if there's a status quo or best engine among the gradcafe community.
  3. Thanks for your insight fso! Very helpful. Absolutely, went away. GWU is a great school. It's just one of those decisions I suppose.
  4. http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-public-affairs-schools/public-management-administration-rankings
  5. That's exactly my thinking. Part-time would be ideal I feel, but if I end up at GWU full-time, the internship opportunities in the DC area would be phenomenal. I won't have the same opportunities at a Michigan/Princeton/Harvard program. I'm definitely interested in a DC career, so why would I opt for living elsewhere when I can study minutes away from my dream employers? Now the question is what if I have to pay at GWU and not elsewhere?
  6. For someone who is fairly certain about a Washington, DC career, would it make sense to find a job and study part-time at GWU (or go full time) or go to a higher ranked/brand name program outside of the DC area? I'm dreaming about the incredible part-time internship opportunities each semester if I end up at GWU, but a mores prestigious/higher ranked program might have its own plusses. Thoughts? Disclaimer: This thread isn't meant to knock. GWU. It's an incredible school with great programs.
  7. For example, I often times see doctoral programs listing certain areas of research or concentrations with a disclaimer reading "or design your own concentration with approval of your faculty mentor" that leads me to believe maybe it's ok to change your degree title. It makes sense on surface that you should probably tell people the degree that you actually got, but I can easily see how students may worry about being weeded out during the initial job scan - particularly for fields that have career tracks outside of academia. i.e. a Public Policy masters degree student writing "Environmental Policy" because that's the track he pursued. Look here - a student can pursue a degree in biological engineering with specializations in biomedical or environmental..but does that make it a biomedical engineering degree? At this institution, there is also a BS in environmental engineering degree program. Confusing.. http://www.engineering.uga.edu/bs-biological-engineering
  8. I'm not sure if this is a standard practice, but I've noticed some students from a degree program will tweak the name of their degree. i.e. a PhD in Public Policy would become a PhD in Science and Technology Policy for someone who specialized in S&T policy while in school. Is this a legal/ethical/accepted practice? Do students often times tweak the actual name of their degree on their CVs if they specialized while in school?
  9. If you're going to hire a tenure track professor you might as well try to ensure that they live long and publish lots. It's all a game.
  10. I've been using Mac for the past 8 years. Sadly, my laptop died a few months back and I've been using a super clunky/old HP Pavilion since then. I'm in the market to buy a new laptop, and I'm wondering if it Stata, SAS, SPSS, R and other quant/qual programs will work well on a Mac. Any thoughts here?
  11. It's suggested* to attend a different school from your undergrad. Whether that's the norm? I'm not sure. Would be an interesting study. Maybe everyone is unemployed because they went to the same school as their undergrad
  12. Well, I'm referring to "professional" blogs maintained by some organization or entity as with the links given above. I, of course, wouldn't list a blog post on my CV that's from my personal webspace, just as I wouldn't list a Facebook status or a but I'm not sure if I would or wouldn't list if I submitted an article to a blog and it was published a la these organizations. Judging from your sidebar, your field is media and communications, so folks may be more open-minded to new forms of communication.
  13. I've been hearing from different people that blogs are becoming more popularized forms of actual publications. Now, this is not to say a blog post would be considered a referred publications even if its peer reviewed and edited. However, some may consider blog posts something like an op-ed, opinion piece or an interview in a mainstream or non-academic publication. Alternatively, some academics may use blogs to communicate with the broader practitioner community. (The blog would not be your personal blog, it would be a blog run by some other group. See below) For example in neuroscience: http://www.theneuroethicsblog.com/ For example in student affairs: http://wisakc.com/ What are your thoughts on blog posts? Is this really an effective way to communicate your ideas? Does anyone know which fields use this the most and which fields use it the least? Etiquette for listing blog posts on CV? Personally, there is a professional/academic association in my field(science & tech policy/higher education) which uses blog-like posts on their website. I would consider writing for them because the group is well-known and well-respected in my area. I don't know if it would be worth my time to write a piece for a smaller blog.
  14. Yikes.. I apologize for the ridiculous amount of typos in my first post. Thanks for the input. Given I'm an undergraduate, I have a "leadership" category consisting of club leadership positions, professional leadership positions etc. Apart from that, I have a publication section and a presentation section. I don't really have a service section.. I do have some service work.. I suppose it could work.
  15. So I have the possibility of convening a round table discussion at an annual conference for a organization that is not necessarily a professional organization like American ____ Association..but academics may attend and/or present. 'll be applying to masters programs this fall, so I won't really have any official designation as "student from X graduate program." The rond table will be part of a project that I'm working on as a summer intern. Is this something that can be cited on my CV under presentations? The participants will be pretty high level people and it's very relevant to my field. It's something I want people to know about even though it's not a traditional presentation.
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