Jump to content

Tigla

Members
  • Content Count

    179
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Everything posted by Tigla

  1. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    First letter is a rejection. It gets harder and harder every cycle to eat these letters and still keep your head up. To everyone who received an acceptance, congratulations! Your foot is in the door. Get ready to kick it in!
  2. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    @historygeek, the best medicine tends to be laughter. I miss The Office so much and needed a little chuckle after the stressful morning of waking up to no emails from universities.
  3. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    Acceptances for Berkeley do not go out until mid-February, according to my POI. Also, the UC Berkeley history webpage says this: "When will a decision be made? The department, via the Graduate Division, will typically contact applicants via the Slate online application system by mid-February." From my past cycles, any acceptances at "major schools" (already been debated in this topic) before February, which show up on the Results page, tend to be dodgy and unreliable. It could be someone entering their information wrong or just some troll stirring the pot.
  4. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    Interviews are a good sign, but not a guarantee that you will receive a letter of admission. Also, some universities do not interview and some POIs may choose not to interview. From my experiences of last cycle, I was interviewed and placed on wait-lists which could mean that I flunked the interview, my POI chose not to push my application, or (more likely) I did not convince the admissions committee to offer me an acceptance letter. If you are not interviewed by a school, then try not to stress out. The admission process is really starting up this week/next week as professors return from vacations. Hang in there! We have only 4-6 weeks to go!
  5. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    I want to echo psstein's comments. I had 2 interviews and both interviewers said the committee will make a decision in early-February. This is not always the rule, though. Last cycle, I received news from all my universities in the first week of March (all were waiting lists with interviews). Speaking of interviews, is it the norm to send "thank you emails" to professors after the interview? I'm used to sending a quick email after a job interview, but was not sure if it was a "must do" for PhD interviews. Google gives conflicting answers, so better to run it by the community before shooting myself in the foot.
  6. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    All my applications are in and its time to play the waiting game, again! First crate of beer has been bought and bottles are cooling in the fridge. If you want a different vice, I found work and friends tend to be a better coping mechanism than family. My family loves to question me about my graduate studies, which is not a soothing thing during the wait. For all applicants, find your mechanism and stick to it. Before you know it, the wait will be over and we will all have answers. Best of luck to you all!
  7. I will second Vaz's comments. I have the similar GRE scores and was put on waitlists across the board last cycle. If your WS, SOP, and letters are fine-tuned pieces, then your application will be read and a decision will be made on it, hopefully without looking at the GRE score. Best of luck with your application!
  8. German has a perfect response "jaein." I guess the translation (there is no real translation) is "yeah, but no." The program is only 5 years old and is starting to have students apply and enter some of the top European PhD programs, which has helped create a touch of awareness for the program in the US. Name recognition is on the rise, but it still has a way to go before it becomes a "premier program." This is partially due to the German education system and culture around graduate programs. In Germany (generally Europe too), graduate programs are seen as a means to weed out researchers and scholars from professionals. This leads the university, staff, and professors not offering much help unless you reach out and ask for it. Even then, you must be prepared or you will be brushed off. The idea, from my experience, is to throw students into the deep end and see who swims and who floats. The floaters are passed through the program while the swimmers are fine-tuned and prepared for PhD study. I recommend picking up German if you study in Germany or do anything related to Europe since most universities will ask you to have basic knowledge of German for advanced studies. In the case of the MA in Berlin, German is an unwritten necessity. You can complete the entire program in English, but you will miss out on the uniqueness of German academia and historical thinking without a working knowledge of German. Since I am training to be a historian of Germany since 1945, I loved my experience in Berlin as it taught me a lot of important realities/effects of the Cold War ('the West' and 'the East' blended in a curious manner in Berlin after 1990). If you are training in African or Chinese history, then I highly recommend the program as several renowned European scholars work in Berlin and the program encourages outreach to these scholars. Lastly, the student body is a mixture of 'good' and 'bad' students. As stated above, the system will not babysit you. A lot of American and British students expect the system to support them by holding their hand due to the design and goal of American and British undergraduate systems. The German system is a sink or swim one and it is ruthless, which, I believe, has caused mixed reviews of the program. If you are studying an MA to prepare for a PhD program, then you will not have any problems in finding support. If you are studying an MA to live in Berlin, however, then be prepared to flounder.
  9. telkanuru hit the nail on the head with the British MAs. The UK loves to milk foreigners for money and rarely offers scholarships to foreigners, even more so with the chaos of Brexit. As for the MA Global History in Berlin, it is fairly similar to American MAs in intensity and workload. If you want to go abroad, I would apply directly to the programs, but also fill out the Fulbright applications (US-UK and US-Germany), Marshall Scholarship (US-UK), and DAAD (US-Germany). Living in Berlin is fairly easy off of a part-time job, but it will definitely be tight some months. In all, I don't see why you should not apply to MA programs. If you emphasize your work experiences, you can bolster your application.
  10. TMP's answer hits most of your questions. I want to stress the transnational approach that TMP mentioned, though. Follow your research plan, but the unfortunate reality is that academics need to always adjust to funding schemes and initiatives. I suggest trying to find a way to include your home country in your research, in a very broad manner that makes sense to your work. Don't force a transnational approach if one does not exist.
  11. Doktorvater/mutter is actually a Ph.D. advisor, not merely an academic advisor. That would be my first question to the DAAD: what exactly are the requirements to apply for the grant? Next, I would start reaching out to universities, or affiliated universities, near your desired archives, and begin talking about possibly sponsoring your trip as a host university, not financially. German bureaucracy is very picky with few exceptions, especially the DAAD. If you do not receive a sponsor, then you need to talk to the DAAD about their possible exceptions. It might be possible to use your home university as a sponsor, but I'm not entirely sure. My last comment revolves around your research itself. The DAAD recently switched its funding targets to better represent 'Third World' scholars and research topics. I had to change my statement to reflect the DAAD's new target, but not every researcher can do that. In short, talk to the DAAD as they will be able to answer your questions on their requirements.
  12. I had a bit higher scores than you on the GRE, but still below the "average" scored for accepted students. Instead of applying for PhD programs, I went abroad and completed an MA. This may not be an option for you, but going abroad helped improve my application to the point of getting waitlists and some acceptances, no rejections. I highly recommend at looking funded MAs as they will help you develop your skills (foreign languages, writing, reading, critical thinking, etc), thereby improving your application and helping you to explain the "below average" GRE scores. Best of luck in your search!
  13. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    As a minor league player, I hope to merely be called up to the majors. Pitching to Judge during the ALCS is merely a dream at the moment.
  14. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    Meh...ignore me. I cannot delete my posts.
  15. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    And this is why this forum is amazing! I hate this political mess we call academia with a passion.
  16. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    Yes. I will be writing mine on one of the newest books in my desired field, which so happens to be written by a Yale professor and possible advisor.
  17. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    Since the American system is about to start back up, how are our applications coming along? Anyone stuck on a specific part of it? Any good/bad news from professors and universities?
  18. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    I may have crossed this line, which started this problematic exercise. @historygeek As you have seen from my earlier post to this one, there are many differing opinions on how to write an SOP and what is necessary content for one. You have put a lot of effort into writing SOPs this early in the process, which is very helpful and will limit the stress later in the process. I, however, highly recommend taking a step back at this moment. Deadlines are not for another 5 months (roughly). Take a couple weeks and get away from the application material before you start making major changes and adjustments. When I edit and proofread, I try to give myself at least 3 days away from my work before I begin to edit. A small amount of time away refreshes your eyes, but also gives you a moment to critically think about your work.
  19. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    As @OHSP said above, go for a research hook. In my case, my opening paragraph uses my experiences in Cambodia as an English teacher to question binaries in the historical literature on development aid programs and human rights. It is less formal, but it grasps the committee's attention (at least I hope it does) and shows that I have thought about my research questions despite being out of university for a year. In general, you do not want to write a literary and fictional hook, but you need to grab the attention of the committee within the first paragraph. Otherwise, your application will be going in the bin; especially, since you are applying to some of the most selective programs in the US.
  20. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    I might fall into a minority here, but I was bored by the end of your first paragraphs. There was no hook that drew me to your SOP. You hit all the necessary points (fit, research, questions, etc), but there has to still be a bit of you and your style. If you apply to all of the programs listed, then you need to draw the committee in and keep their attention because most committees will be looking for a reason to drop your application, not accept it. Right now, I suggest taking a break from writing SOPs and getting some distance. Your statements are great starting points, but need to be refined (in my opinion) for style. In 3-4 weeks, come back to your SOPs and re-read them with a very critical eye.
  21. These two posts worry me a bit. If you want to do an MA, then you should be fine to go ahead and apply to Oxford or Cambridge. However, a Ph.D. at both institutions without at least one foreign language is unacceptable. In your time period and topic, you could use French, German, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Hindi, Chinese, etc. as possible second and third languages. The 'global' turn requires scholars to branch their language skills outside of the norms in order to ask unique and new questions. In your specific case, British Imperial History was dominated by men who only spoke English for decades (could still be argued today) which caused the historiography to be fairly biased and reinforced a lot of colonial attitudes. In order to mediate and alleviate these caveats, I suggest working on your French starting tomorrow and looking into either an Asian or African language. You could also, in theory, pick up Spanish, but I think a 'non-Western' language will be more beneficial and nuanced for your field.
  22. Tigla

    Writing sample?

    For my MA, my advisors gave me a handful of tips for writing the historiography section, which may or may not apply to you. First, keep the arguments broad and concise. The smaller and finer arguments will be fleshed out in the body of your work as you place yourself directly and indirectly against specific ideas and phrases. The introduction is meant to give a broad overview of your work, not a blow by blow account. Second, do not write another introduction in the footnotes. Footnotes are meant to explain your ideas, but also provide further resources for the reader, not to explain finite points in depth. If these finite points are important, then put them in your body, not the footnotes. Lastly, do not fall into the trap of painting a hole in the literature that your work fills. It is a trope that a lot of students use, but rarely applies in practice. Instead, focus on the ways your work expands the literature and our understanding of your topic. Best of luck with your writing!
  23. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    I talked with him when he came to my university 2 weeks ago and he told me that too, but he also said that he may take on one last student. At most, Maier would be a third reader, but more than likely a person to bounce ideas off of if he remains around a bit (A stretch I know but one can hope). I'm mainly interested in working with Manela and Westad as advisors, and the two centers for international/global history at Harvard. I had Mazower on my list, but then took him off for some reason. I will take a second look. Thanks for the reminder! One of my recommenders just said this today! Thanks for the heads up, though.
  24. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    @TMP Thanks for the article! I must have missed it through my literature review. @OHSP Thank you for the possible advisors. It is a shame Nolan is retiring; I really enjoyed reading her insights into post-WWII Germany.
  25. Tigla

    Applications 2019

    It is time to throw my hat back into the ring. Last year, I was accepted into two UK universities (one of which I deferred for a year) and was waitlisted on my three US applications. Hopefully, this round will be the one! In a broad sense, I focus on global development programs during the Cold War. A lot of work has been done on American and Soviet programs, the role of international organizations, and the effects of 'development' on the 'Third World.' Following the literature from the Global Cold War, my plan is to attempt to look at how European countries, specifically the Germanys, justified their programs and the decision-making process once the decision was made to aid a country. Through my work, I hope to be able to combine the growing political and international histories of the Global Cold War with the economic and intellectual histories of development aid programs. Then, apply these frameworks back into Europe to figure out why European countries actively engaged in these programs. UNC-Chapel Hill: Klaus Larres and Karen Hagemann (Need to go through the faculty again) Princeton: Harold James, Christina Davis, Helen Miller, Andrew Moravcsik Northwestern: Daniel Immerwahr, Lauren Stokes, Kyle Burke Brandeis: David Engermann and Shameel Ahmad Columbia: Matthew Connelly, Anders Stephanson, Adam Tooze, and Paul Thomas Chamberlin NYU: Stephen Gross and Mary Nolan (still a maybe) TAM: Hoi-eun Kim, Jason Parker, and Adam Seipp Stony Brook: Young-Sun Hong, Larry Fordham, Michael Barnhart (another maybe) Harvard: Erez Manela, Charles S Maier, Arne Westad Indiana: Nick Cullather and Stephen Macekura I'm still expanding my list and trying to cast my net fairly wide before starting to cut universities. The rest of my application will be mostly edited from last year's one. My writing sample, however, will be a chapter from my MA thesis which used exclusively German sources. As for my recommendations, they will change because 2 of my writers are leaving academia for the private sector.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.