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Ethersworn

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About Ethersworn

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  1. Yes, this primarily stems from desiring to be near a significant other who is graduating this year and will likely be in the North East either in the fall '12, or may take a year off and go the next fall '13. I am hoping that if I keep my GPA at a 4.0 and start intensively GRE studying and continue to do so for the next 8 months and can achieve a remarkably high score that maybe the lack of excess courses will be compensated for?
  2. I'm actually planning to apply straight into MA/Phd programs with no year off so I can get to the North East as soon as possible.
  3. Thanks, Well, would my application given all of that information be competitive in a pool of MA programs? There aren't many Linguistics MA programs (at least not in the North East which I am limited to for the same reason I may graduate early) but there are a couple of Classics (Philology) or Medieval Studies MAs that I feel like I could more likely get into and perhaps use as a stepping stone to get into somewhere like Harvard for my Phd. Also, I will have had at least 2 500 (semi graduate) courses by graduation and 2 700 (fully graduate) level courses if I choose to graduate early, if that helps characterize my academic experience at this point.
  4. Greetings, I am a 2nd semester sophomore (or junior, depending) majoring in Classics (Latin focus) and minoring in Linguistics at the South Carolina Honors College at USouthCarolina (ranked 34th in the country for Linguistics). (http://www.stat.tamu...rc41.html#area7) I have a 4.0 and have finished the classes I didn't have desire to study for (lab sciences, math, &c.) leaving me with only languages and linguistics courses to take. For personal reasons, I have a strong desire to graduate a year early as it would open up a fantastic possibility in my personal life but I do not want to hurt my future career. By the end of spring semester next year, I will have taken 3 years of Latin and the equivalent of 2 years of Greek, 2 years of German, at least 1 year of Old English and 1 year of Old Norse. I want to eventually get a Phd in Historical Linguistics from somewhere nice (Cornell, UPenn, Harvard, Minnesota, &c.), regardless of whether I get a prefatory Masters degree. Theoretically, if I stayed for a full 4 years I would graduate with a Classics major and Linguistics and German double minor, while 3 years would leave me with a German cognate instead . I will have written a senior thesis (ideally doing some comparative linguistics with my familiar languages) and possibly have presented at a conference by this point next year. My ultimate question is, if I go ahead and graduate early, will I be a highly competitive candidate for these sorts of MA programs or would I be shooting myself in the foot by pushing forward for person reasons?
  5. Greetings, I am a 2nd semester sophomore (or junior, depending) majoring in Classics (Latin focus) and minoring in Linguistics at the South Carolina Honors College at USouthCarolina (ranked 34th in the country for Linguistics). (http://www.stat.tamu.edu/~jnewton/nrc_rankings/nrc41.html#area7) I have a 4.0 and have finished the classes I didn't have desire to study for (lab sciences, math, &c.) leaving me with only languages and linguistics courses to take. For personal reasons, I have a strong desire to graduate a year early as it would open up a fantastic possibility in my personal life but I do not want to hurt my future career. By the end of spring semester next year, I will have taken 3 years of Latin and the equivalent of 2 years of Greek, 2 years of German, at least 1 year of Old English and 1 year of Old Norse. I want to eventually get a Phd in Historical Linguistics from somewhere nice (Cornell, UPenn, Harvard, Minnesota, &c.), regardless of whether I get a prefatory Masters degree. Theoretically, if I stayed for a full 4 years I would graduate with a Classics major and Linguistics and German double minor, while 3 years would leave me with a German cognate instead . I will have written a senior thesis (ideally doing some comparative linguistics with my familiar languages) and possibly have presented at a conference by this point next year. My ultimate question is, if I go ahead and graduate early, will I be a highly competitive candidate for these sorts of MA programs or would I be shooting myself in the foot by pushing forward for person reasons?
  6. Information upon graduation Major: Classics (Latin 4 years, Greek 2 years) Minors: Linguistics, German (3 years) Formally Trained Languages: Latin, Greek, German, Old English (2 years), Old Norse (1 year) I am currently a sophomore with a 4.0, though my last difficult gen ed class, Inductive Logic, may very well end in a B+, so there is an at least likely possibility my final GPA will be something like 3.9(6?). At the end of this year I will have taken 3 graduate level courses on Germanic Languages, Norse, and Old English. I am studying abroad at ULeeds for my Junior year. I am hoping to do a small scale research project over the summer (dreaming of having it published?) and then begin a separate senior thesis while in Leeds. My problem is that I am a Classics major and am very interested in going to graduate school for them, however my mentor is a Medievalist from Toronto and I feel a passion for the field, specifically in Germanic languages/culture/religion. Linguistics, specifically historical and specifically specifically Indo-European is also a strong interest of mine (paired with IE culture). I am trying to get some feedback on what I will be best suited to do with what I will take from my university, the Honors College at USouthCarolina. Also, what programs would my current/projected stats suggest for me? I really want to go to a top 10 school in whatever field I choose. Thanks.
  7. Greetings, I am currently a Classical Languages undergraduate student at USouth Carolina. Upon graduation I will have roughly 4 years of Latin, 3 years of German, 2 years of Greek, 2 years of Old English, and 1 year of Old Norse. I will also have some various Medieval era courses. I want to attend a top Medieval Studies graduate program but am worried that having an undergrad degree in Classics rather than Medieval Studies (which my school doesn't have) may set me back. My sophomore undergraduate research is on Proto Indo European\, but my Senior thesis will obviously be on a medieval topic. Can anyone shed light on whether this will be of detriment to my acceptance chances? Thanks,
  8. Greetings, I am currently a Classical Languages undergraduate student at USouth Carolina. Upon graduation I will have roughly 4 years of Latin, 3 years of German, 2 years of Greek, 2 years of Old English, and 1 year of Old Norse. I will also have some various Medieval era courses. I want to attend a top Medieval Studies graduate program but am worried that having an undergrad degree in Classics rather than Medieval Studies (which my school doesn't have) may set me back. My sophomore undergraduate research is on Proto Indo European\, but my Senior thesis will obviously be on a medieval topic. Can anyone shed light on whether this will be of detriment to my acceptance chances? Thanks,
  9. Thanks for your reply. Hrmm, is there any solution to the citizenship problem? I guess I am talking about both, but primarily the PhD.
  10. I am a rising sophomore undergraduate at the USouth Carolina majoring in Medieval Studies (interdisciplinary studies) and am dead set on getting into the ASNaC program at Cambridge. Can anyone here tell me anything about the acceptance rate at this program? I have a 4.0 GPA and am starting my first research project 1st semester sophomore year on the Prose Edda and the attitude toward the old gods. By application time I will have the following languages: Latin (4 years) German (3 years) Old English (1 year) Norse (1 year) Can anyone help me direct my desire to be accepted into this program?
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