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I'm a junior CSD student so I have the option to pursue an AuD or MS/MA in speech path. I really like both, I have observed both, and find pros and cons of each. I think my biggest con of getting the AuD is the extra time in school and still getting almost the same salary as an SLP. My biggest con of SLP is how short term therapy can be so I feel like I don't build long-term relationships with clients. If you were on the fence about which to pursue please tell me what you picked and why! 

*cross-posted with the Audiology blog.

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My dream is to be a AuD, but I can’t move so boo. I was accepted to be a SLP though, YAY! I prefer AuD almost for the sole purpose of how black and white it is audiology has text you run, in a particular order for the most part, and you get diagnosed with XYZ, and get a HA. Obviously more complicated than that, but you get the gist. With Speech and Language, it’s so vague. Who knows what is going to work for a certain client. That scares me. 

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4 hours ago, jpiccolo said:

I’m not sure where you’re getting the short term part of SLP. Unless you’re working in acute care or rehab or a traveling SLP. In schools or private therapy you spend a lot of time with clients. 

I second this. SLP is a lot of long-term goals, especially for school or nursing homes...

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In response to the idea that Speech Path is "vague", I feel like this is a huge opportunity to push yourself. I personally love SLP because of this. You have to get creative. Not everything works for everyone, so it is up to you as the therapist to do some additional research and push yourself to be better (for yourself and your clients). No two cases are ever the same, and for me that is one of the most exciting things. There will never be a dull day at work. I don't know much about AuD, so I can't really weigh in, but in the case of being an SLP, I don't think short term is a bad thing either. If you are the therapist that works with a client in a hospital or rehab setting, you are probably going to be the one that sets that client up for future therapy elsewhere. I think it can be incredibly personal and connecting when you are probably one of the first people they speak to after their stroke, TBI, diagnosis, etc. which means you would be so much more than just a therapist. You would be a counselor is many ways as well. There is definitely so much that goes into being an SLP. I definitely don't think you could ever go wrong with this profession if it is something you are passionate about. 

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