Jump to content
  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt

Non-traditional Statistics PhD Applicant Seeking Advice


NIYNI
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,

Seeking advice/opinions on applications for Stat PhD courses in the US. I will be applying to start in Fall 2022.

My profile:

Nationality: Indian (undergrad in UK, IB Diploma in Singapore)

Grade Scale: 1st - A+, 2:1 - A, 2:2 - B

Undergraduate - BSc Economics (London School of Economics) with 2:1

Math/Stat Courses - Mathematical Methods(1st), Elementary Stat Theory(1st), Abstract Math( high 2:1), Operations Research(high 2:1), Econometrics(2:2)

Postgraduate(Not sure if this is considered postgraduate) - Graduate Certificate in Theoretical Probability and Statistics from Open University (will complete in July 2021) - Im doing this as i have not taken stat courses to at least an intermediate level. Im hoping that this would also help with preparing GRE Math subject test.

I have not yet taken GRE and I intend to take the GRE Math Subject test.

LOR(have not got yet but expected): Average. Did not build good rapport with professors at undergrad but will do for the grad certificate.

Relevant Work Experience: Worked in Credit Risk Advisory in the year since graduating and credit risk internship during the first summer of undergrad

Other Relevant Experience - Econometrics Student Lecturer, Quantitative Economics research project

 

I  would like to apply for Statistics PhD programs at Washington, UChicago, UMich, U Wisconsin Madison, JHU, Rutgers, UPenn, CMU, BU, Georgia Tech etc

I am also open to doing a Biostat PhD ( i do not intend on doing my PhD research in financial statistics)

I know i do not have an undergrad math/stat major, but im attempting to improve that situation through the grad cert in theoretical probability and statistics. How do i stand amongst the competition? Would i stand a better chance completing an MA or MS then applying to a PhD program?

I have until Dec 2021 to add education/work experience/ qualifications. How can i improve my profile ?

Appreciate your advice and thanks for your time!??

 

 

Edited by NIYNI
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although you have a degree from a top UK university, your math background is severely lacking compared to other international students. Based on your profile, you don't satisfy the prerequisites for any statistics / biostats PhD program. At a minimum, you need Calc I-III, Linear Algebra, and Real Analysis I. International students will typically have much more, including Abstract Algebra, Real Analysis II, Complex Analysis, etc. 

Although you may have covered these topics in mathematical methods / abstract math, I think it will be difficult to convince adcoms that you have the same knowledge as students who have dedicated individual courses to these topics

To be frank, I think the only route you can take to do a stats PhD program is to take all the prerequisite courses (and then some). You're probably looking at a 2-2.5 year commitment minimum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, StatsG0d said:

Although you have a degree from a top UK university, your math background is severely lacking compared to other international students. Based on your profile, you don't satisfy the prerequisites for any statistics / biostats PhD program. At a minimum, you need Calc I-III, Linear Algebra, and Real Analysis I. International students will typically have much more, including Abstract Algebra, Real Analysis II, Complex Analysis, etc. 

Although you may have covered these topics in mathematical methods / abstract math, I think it will be difficult to convince adcoms that you have the same knowledge as students who have dedicated individual courses to these topics

To be frank, I think the only route you can take to do a stats PhD program is to take all the prerequisite courses (and then some). You're probably looking at a 2-2.5 year commitment minimum.

Appreciate the honesty! This is exactly what i wanted to know.

I do not mind spending 2-2.5 learning the prereqs. After undergrad, I realise that I much prefer math to economics and honestly i could do another undergrad in math if it weren't for the fortune i'd have to spend.

Would getting a decent score(>80%) on the Math GRE level the playing field slightly?

I've heard of unis admitting students with deficient math backgrounds but allowing them to sit prereq courses(without counting towards the PhD). Have you seen such cases?

 

 

Edited by NIYNI
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/14/2020 at 12:02 PM, NIYNI said:

Would getting a decent score(>80%) on the Math GRE level the playing field slightly?

I think it would help, but I don't think it would replace the fact that you don't have all the prerequisite courses. Maybe if you got an absolutely stellar score (>90%) I could see it replacing the courses.

On 8/14/2020 at 12:02 PM, NIYNI said:

I've heard of unis admitting students with deficient math backgrounds but allowing them to sit prereq courses(without counting towards the PhD). Have you seen such cases?

I know departments often list this on their web sites, but I have never heard of a student who got in despite lacking the preqrequisites.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Given your current profile, it would be unrealistic to apply to any ranked PhD program. You would need a lot more math courses to be considered. The minimum requirement for admission is calculus 1-3, linear algebra 1-2 and introductory probability/mathematical statistics. However, most applicants have real analysis and other proof-based courses, especially at programs you listed. After completing these courses with strong grades, you may stand a chance at these schools. 

As for the math GRE subject test, I doubt that you can get a good score with your current background. The test covers all topics at the undergraduate level and in addition to the above math courses, you should also have basic knowledge in ordinary differential equations, number theory, abstract algebra and complex analysis.The test takers are mostly students who intend to apply for math PhD so you are competing against them, and most of whom have taken more math courses beyond the courses I listed. With that said, an >80% is not attainable if you don't have extensive math background.

Edited by Casorati
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.