Jump to content

StatsG0d

Members
  • Content Count

    528
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

StatsG0d last won the day on October 29

StatsG0d had the most liked content!

5 Followers

About StatsG0d

  • Rank
    Macchiato

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    United States
  • Application Season
    Already Attending
  • Program
    Biostatistics

Recent Profile Visitors

7,449 profile views
  1. TLDR: All those programs are pretty similar. If McGill is a sure thing, it's probably only worth it to apply to other places if you would for sure go there over McGill. These rankings might help (but they include OR so there's some noise). All of those programs are great. The ones @Casorati mentioned are all really good. I would put them in the same tier. Provided you get into at least two of these, I would say go wherever you feel you would be happiest. If it were my choice, I would say McGill simply for the location. Sure, it's cold, but so is West Lafayette, Urbana, and State Coll
  2. I agree with @Casorati. Northwestern's program honestly is not great. Evanston is a really nice place and near Chicago so location it's awesome, but the program prestige is pretty lacking.
  3. All of those programs are much more competitive relative to their respective rankings, so I feel like it's a waste of resources.
  4. Based on your profile, I would only apply to the larger programs in both stat and biostat. Duke biostat seems like a waste, as does Yale and Brown Stat. You could maybe consider adding Emory and/or Pitt for Biostat. The former would be a solid target and the latter a solid "safety".
  5. First, I think you'll have to specify which of these departments that you are applying to are stats and which are biostats. Second, I am surprised you list Pitt as a reach and McGill as a "safety," as McGill is arguably the superior department. Thirdly, I really think this is tough to judge. The D in linear algebra looks very bad, and normally I would say this would exclude you from any ranked stats/ biostats program. However, you've received top marks in graduate level math classes. It's unclear how adcoms will view this, and you should address it in your personal statement. Fi
  6. I guess I would not submit it. You should note that Northwestern is highly competitive relative to its ranking due to school prestige.
  7. I feel like the following schools are very high reaches for you: Carnegie Mellon, Berkeley, Stanford, Harvard, Chicago, and Washington. Of the remaining schools, some (more attainable) reaches would be Duke, Yale, and Michigan. The remaining schools sound reasonable as targets.
  8. I think if you explain the drop in GPA on your SOP, you'll get into many of those programs.
  9. I absolutely agree that you should apply to as many schools as you can afford. It's always best to cast a wide net, but many people tend to have financial constraints that preclude them from applying to more than say 7 schools. Michigan is worth adding only if you're surely interested in genomics. If you're not set on it, I don't really think Michigan is a good place to be. Their placements are great, but I feel this is more of a function of the fact that genomics is very hot right now, and UMich is probably the best in the world at it. I think the school list seems pretty reasonable
  10. Yes, I think you are aiming too high. This does not mean that you’re not a qualified candidate. You have a strong profile, it’s just that the average international student’s profile is significantly stronger. It has nothing to do with your degree but just your math background. I did not major in math or stat but still had several more math courses than you have taken. You have to put yourselves in the shoes of the adcoms and ask “should we admit this student when there are several students (both domestic and international) who have A+ grades in complex analysis, measure theory, etc. who a
  11. I think maybe Pitt would be a good option. NCSU would be somewhat of a reach, but they have some faculty doing research in biostatistics. As they are a larger program, there's a nonzero chance you could get in. Drexel (in Philly like UPenn) has a PhD in biostatistics, although I cannot attest to its strength. If your goal is industry, then where you do your PhD does not really matter all that much. GWU might be a good option if you could consider the DC area. They have PhD programs in both stats and biostats. In general, I think you should target the larger, more applied programs.
  12. First, Yale, UPenn, and Columbia are not really in the same league as UNC for biostatistics, but the latter does not compute GPAs so it's fair to assume that you went to one of the former 3. Second, your math background is relatively shallow for an international student. Because of this, I do not think you have a good chance at either UConn or TAMU for stats. For biostats, I do not see you getting into Hopkins, Harvard, or UW at all. I think you have a slim chance at UNC. The rest of the programs on your list are considerably less theoretical, so you might have a better shot. However, th
  13. I think any program outside the top-3 (UW, JHU, Harvard) is plausible for you. Based on your history, it looks like you're really into theory, so I would say the only biostat programs that would be a good "fit" would be those top-3 and UNC. The other biostat programs are less focused on theoretical training. I'll close by mentioning it does not really matter much where you study. If your advisor is well known and well connected, that will hold a lot more weight than coming from a top program with an unknown advisor. Publishing in JASA is really at least 50% luck as there is no way of know
  14. Sorry, I misunderstood "top-100 Asian" as "an Asian university in the top-100" If your school isn't necessarily renowned for producing top quality graduate students (e.g., Peking, Tsinghua, ISI), the best strategy is to find out where your school has successfully sent PhD students, because they are already familiar with how competitive it is and know how the graduates of these universities fared at their programs. Perhaps you can talk to some professors / the chair of the department. I am sure that they know where students have gone. These schools should comprise your "target" schools.
  15. I think your profile is strong. Do you know if your institution has successfully sent many applicants to US PhD programs? Based on the rankings, I'm assuming you have gone to one of Yonsei, NKKU, or USTC. I'm not familiar with the latter two and only slightly familiar with the first.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.