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Adjunct - first teaching position


nehs
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I am a recent master's graduate in computer science. I work steadily in a full-time job. I had been thinking of teaching jobs for a few months. Then, I applied to various places and I finally landed a position last week. This is an adjunct position teaching just once class.The class meets every other week. Unfortunately, I forgot to ask the pay during the interview.

 

Now, the real problem is this is a college that is 60 miles away from me. 60 miles does not sound bad but I live in NYC and travelling 5 miles here is a pain. I don't have a car either. This position is out on long island.

 

I'm confused what to do. I haven't verbally or officially accepted anything yet but I would love to teach at a college and this is my chance. But the distance scares me.

 

Any thoughts? How far would you guys commute for your job?

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I just took a two-year term job that's also about 60 miles from where I live, so I'll be doing that commute about four times a week. I'm not looking forward to the commute but it allows my partner to keep a job they're happy with so for our relationship I think it's worth the compromise... though I'll probably spend 25% of my salary on commuting.

 

So twice a month? Go for it, assuming it's actually possible without a car.

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Yeah, I mean I wouldn't buy a car just for one class ;)

 

Me, I'm trying to figure out whether a one-hour commute by car (which is completely wasted time) is better than 2 hours by train (where at least I can work).

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Interesting, we have the same dilemma :)

 

I wish you the best.

 

I haven't aasked them the salary yet, hopefully, it is more than $20 per hour!!

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Most places pay a flat rate per course, not per hour. You might be able to look it up on their website.

 

If you're doing a fresh prep it probably won't be very much if you actually calculate an hourly rate. I think the consensus is that it's only a decent wage when you're not prepping anymore (i.e., the second, third, fourth times you teach it...).

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Me, I'm trying to figure out whether a one-hour commute by car (which is completely wasted time) is better than 2 hours by train (where at least I can work).

I'd prefer a train - in order to relax BEFORE and after classes. 

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Most places pay a flat rate per course, not per hour. You might be able to look it up on their website.

 

If you're doing a fresh prep it probably won't be very much if you actually calculate an hourly rate. I think the consensus is that it's only a decent wage when you're not prepping anymore (i.e., the second, third, fourth times you teach it...).

Do you think I should just ask how much they pay? I will take a look at the website.

 

This is a first time prep for me, but I'm excited that this is a great oppurtunity.

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Of course you should ask about the pay. Are you nuts? When I taught adjunct I received about $4200 per semester class, plus benefits. Some schools pay as little as $600 per class. You should not feel timid about being informed of your renumeration.

Edited by hiroshiman
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Call up the personnel department and ask what the rate is for an adjunct. It's a flat, semester rate based on credit hour. Some places base it on credit hour *and* enrollment. I had a friend that adjuncted and only got paid the full semester rate if she had 75% or greater enrollment. They cut her pay when students dropped courses.

 

Adjuncting is great for people who want to teach a little on the side, but it's pretty much the gangrene of academia.

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Of course you should ask about the pay. Are you nuts? When I taught adjunct I received about $4200 per semester class, plus benefits. Some schools pay as little as $600 per class. You should not feel timid about being informed of your renumeration.

 

Agreed. I just found out my teaching pay for next year will be about $2500 less than expected/led to believe/the fellowship I've been on, and am about to do everything I can to raise hell. As diplomatically as possible, of course. 

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Thanks guys...I'm still debating if I should just ask the chair who did my interview or ask the HR/Personnel department. Also, they have not contacted me for any paperwork yet. How soon/late do they do this? or should I take initiative and ask.

 

hiroshiman -- makes sense...i did not know how it works in academia...

 

danielewrites -- fantastic idea! they would probably also know the relations between enrolment and pay, if any relation.

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  • 1 month later...

I am the OP here. Thanks for all your advice. I had written about my dilemma and received great insight into my specific situation.

I was super excited about the opportunity. However I have decided to turn down the offer. They have still not told me the pay which is a deal-breaker for me to decide on taking up vs non - taking up.i asked a lot of people in payroll, then HR, the dept chair and no one is telling me my hourly rate. Seriously, they got to be kidding me! I am not motivated to go teach on a Sat morning 7 am 60 miles away without this information. More over I feel I took up the job offer in an impulse decision and now I'm wary of the travel and ttime investment.

Any suggestions on the email that I have to send out?

Edited by nehs
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