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Question of the day~


Quantum Buckyball
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It was a serious question, we always learned name an enzyme after a specific catalytic reaction...but what if there are more than one reaction an enzyme can carry out? Do you just name it based on the catalytic reaction with the fastest kcat/km ? 

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Do the functions occur at the same time? Is one reaction more favored than the others? I hope to name a novel protein/gene. I'll take into account the function(s) and name it in such a way that it has a cool acronym.

Edited by ion_exchanger
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Whichever function was found first was probably how it was named. I remember there's a protein called xxx kinase (the name escapes me), but the protein never comes in contact with xxx in vivo. It was just seen to add phosphate groups to xxx in vitro, so it was given the name and it stuck. 

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http://www.fastbleep.com/biology-notes/40/116/1159

 

I thought it is quite common that an enzyme can catalyze more than 1 reaction. Something like this (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/explore/derivedData.do?structureId=1W85&bionumber=1) can be considered as transketolase, dehydrogenase/oxidoreductase, & synthase. I would assumed naming of a protein is based on the main function it performs.

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http://www.fastbleep.com/biology-notes/40/116/1159

 

I thought it is quite common that an enzyme can catalyze more than 1 reaction. Something like this (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/explore/derivedData.do?structureId=1W85&bionumber=1) can be considered as transketolase, dehydrogenase/oxidoreductase, & synthase. I would assumed naming of a protein is based on the main function it performs.

 

Ohh that's a good website, thank you! 

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http://www.fastbleep.com/biology-notes/40/116/1159

 

I thought it is quite common that an enzyme can catalyze more than 1 reaction. Something like this (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/explore/derivedData.do?structureId=1W85&bionumber=1) can be considered as transketolase, dehydrogenase/oxidoreductase, & synthase. I would assumed naming of a protein is based on the main function it performs.

I imagine it's got to be difficult to determine what an enzyme's main function happens to be. I guess you could try and assay the activity of different reactions it catalyzes in a cell in order to see what it spends the most time doing, but to truly say that a certain reaction is the primary reaction you have to justify it for all cell types and during different metabolic conditions.
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