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Canadian Clinical Psychology GRE Scores


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I will be applying to clinical psychology programs in Canada for fall 2018 entry. I've heard that 80th percentile is the standard for GRE scores in clinical psych, though I am not sure if this is a 'requirement' across the board.

I'll be applying to Ryerson, Concordia, McGill, UVic, UBC, Guelph, Simon Fraser, York and Dalhousie. 

Does anyone know if any of these schools require more or less than the 80th percentile mark for GRE scores?

 

Any insight would be appreciated :)

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From what I've heard, GRE aren't as heavily weighted in your application as much as other things (such as grades and research abilities). As a general rule, you'll want to have at least the 70th percentile in each section to get into a clinical program, although it's possible to get into programs if you have a lower mark in one subsection. I got into a clinical program and interviewed at two of the above schools last application cycle, and was only in the 55th percentile for the quantitative GRE section (I was above the 90th percentile though for verbal, analytic, and the psychology subject test though). Just try to do your best on the GRE and put more of your focus on developing a strong statement of interest for your applications. 

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I think that the 80th percentile standard is more common in the US since they seem to value standardized testing more. In my experience, Canadian schools place much more emphasis on your research experience, GPA, and statement of purpose than the GRE, unless your score is super high or low. To echo what the previous poster said, I've heard that you should aim to score higher than the 65-70th percentile on all sections, but it isn't a huge deal if you score a little lower in one of the sections. 

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On 9/27/2017 at 6:53 PM, FacelessMage said:

From what I've heard, GRE aren't as heavily weighted in your application as much as other things (such as grades and research abilities). As a general rule, you'll want to have at least the 70th percentile in each section to get into a clinical program, although it's possible to get into programs if you have a lower mark in one subsection. I got into a clinical program and interviewed at two of the above schools last application cycle, and was only in the 55th percentile for the quantitative GRE section (I was above the 90th percentile though for verbal, analytic, and the psychology subject test though). Just try to do your best on the GRE and put more of your focus on developing a strong statement of interest for your applications. 

 

On 9/27/2017 at 11:08 PM, hsnl said:

I think that the 80th percentile standard is more common in the US since they seem to value standardized testing more. In my experience, Canadian schools place much more emphasis on your research experience, GPA, and statement of purpose than the GRE, unless your score is super high or low. To echo what the previous poster said, I've heard that you should aim to score higher than the 65-70th percentile on all sections, but it isn't a huge deal if you score a little lower in one of the sections. 

Thank you both for the feedback! I'm currently stuck in the 156v 157q range, though every other aspect of my application is pristine. I'm worried that a low score will keep schools from seeing the rest of my application. I have one more round of the general in a month though, so here's hoping!

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  • 4 weeks later...

For some PIs, the GRE is more of a "another chance" score - like if your GPA is weak, you might want a really strong GRE to show that you can study/learn effectively (although whether the GRE really measures that is questionable!) If your GPA is strong, then you've already demonstrated that you can cope with massive amounts of learning. However, some PIs might use a low GRE score to filter out applicants when they get too many, so make sure you connect with the PIs you want to work with beforehand.

In my experience the GRE doesn't really matter unless it's super low, which yours isn't. Your scores are already very close to the 80 percentile and they are balanced, so I wouldn't stress too much even if your scores remain the same on your next round.

Good luck on your next round of the general!

Edited by CCPsycfan
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1 hour ago, CCPsycfan said:

For some PIs, the GRE is more of a "another chance" score - like if your GPA is weak, you might want a really strong GRE to show that you can study/learn effectively (although whether the GRE really measures that is questionable!) If your GPA is strong, then you've already demonstrated that you can cope with massive amounts of learning. However, some PIs might use a low GRE score to filter out applicants when they get too many, so make sure you connect with the PIs you want to work with beforehand.

In my experience the GRE doesn't really matter unless it's super low, which yours isn't. Your scores are already very close to the 80 percentile and they are balanced, so I wouldn't stress too much even if your scores remain the same on your next round.

Good luck on your next round of the general!

Good to know, thank you! 

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