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Await

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Everything posted by Await

  1. Await

    Waitlists

    I started this thread with hope, but here's my update. May the rest of you have better luck! I think the longer it takes for you to hear, the better! End game for me. Received the standard email directing me to a decision on "ApplyYourself".The decision began "We regret to inform you. . ." When I saw the email I figured it was bad news on the heels of the "high yield" email from above and the fact that the original waitlist decision said we'd be notified after May 15th. I also read a tweet (oh yes the admissions person is on Twitter!) around April 15th commenting on having 40-some people at the admit weekend, which is close to the target program number. From the letter it sounded like they're not going to the waitlist at all this year-- which is quite different than last year, when they took 11 people. Makes applying next year a bit more nerve wracking. . . But there is a blessing in disguise! I had started to think that a different program (well they're considered "tracks" within the M.Ed) is a better fit for me. And now instead of being anxious about that on top of everything, I have plenty of time to figure it out! At least they make the admissions process easier when reapplying. . . And to end on a personal note: I got engaged this winter, so it has been a very happy spring with the exception of this. I'm surprisingly relieved. And of course my fiance is happy to have me stick around. I might just be taking off immediately after our wedding NEXT summer. . . For your sake I hope I don't see you on this forum next year, but all the same, it would be fun to recognize some names. I've been surprised by how supportive, insightful, and just damn good people have been here. Thank you all for reading and especially for commenting! Best of luck to you!
  2. End game for me. Received the standard email directing me to a decision on "ApplyYourself".The decision began "We regret to inform you. . ." When I saw the email I figured it was bad news on the heels of the "high yield" email from above and the fact that the original waitlist decision said we'd be notified after May 15th. I also read a tweet (oh yes the admissions person is on Twitter!) around April 15th commenting on having 40-some people at the admit weekend, which is close to the target program number. From the letter it sounded like they're not going to the waitlist at all this year-- which is quite different than last year, when they took 11 people. Makes applying next year a bit more nerve wracking. . . But there is a blessing in disguise! I had started to think that a different program (well they're considered "tracks" within the M.Ed) is a better fit for me. And now instead of being anxious about that on top of everything, I have plenty of time to figure it out! At least they make the admissions process easier when reapplying. . . And to end on a personal note: I got engaged this winter, so it has been a very happy spring with the exception of this. I'm surprisingly relieved. And of course my fiance is happy to have me stick around. I might just be taking off immediately after our wedding NEXT summer. . . For your sake I hope I don't see you on this forum next year, but all the same, it would be fun to recognize some names. I've been surprised by how supportive, insightful, and just damn good people have been here. Thank you all for reading and especially for commenting! Best of luck to you!
  3. Wow, I got goosebumps over this news! Congratulations! The fat lady has sung to the tune of $$$$$!
  4. Sounds like the best possible position you could be in. Given that it's still early, I'm sure you'll get in! But yes, don't pop the Dom until the final decision comes-- mostly because getting the affirmative is truly something to celebrate! Good luck kaybee!
  5. Hi, I wrote this in a huff so I wasn't clear: I didn't reference that connection in my application at all. I referenced it here because I was just saying it's a shame he died when I was young because he would have been a great person to write a recommendation as he'd know me AND the program well and could speak to the fit. And there is a family expectation-- mostly from my grandmother. I don't think things really work on the connection-system anymore. Or at least I would like to believe that. As for my other recommendations: They know me well. I know what they had to say. And they have the kind of credentials that make them reliable, qualified sources. I actually think my essay was the strongest piece of my application. The weak spot is that I am a career-change candidate. I'm bummed out because it's a sort of Catch-22 situation where it's hard to break into the kinds of jobs I want to do without the degree, apparently hard to get the degree without those kinds of jobs . . . And in terms of education programs, I could probably help myself get in next year by getting a sex change.
  6. Response to my update letter (which they welcomed since I applied at the end of December and a lot has changed since then): Thanks again for sending along this update. While we have so far had a good yield, we have not yet made a decision about any of our waitlisted applicants. If it turns out that we are unable to admit you for this fall, I once again want to encourage you to reapply this winter. Does "A GOOD YIELD" jump out at anyone else? Sounds like they might only be taking a couple people off the list. . . And so the agony continues. The last time this person wrote to me he was much more friendly (and lengthy!) and person said that they might even take people off the waitlist before the 15th if it looked like they weren't going to hit their target number. Guess that didn't happen. Tough year for grad school admissions. . . I had stellar recommendations (one from a Pulitzer Prize winner! another from someone who has written about 10 recs for the same school and every person has gotten in), a 3.7GPA from an Ivy, above the average GREs for the program, and from everyone who read my essay-- a compelling case, story, and read! Ugh. . . And to make matters worse, a family member got his PhD from the same school, started one of the programs there, and taught there for decades. But he died when I was 10, so no recommendation, but still the family expectation. . . just feeling great. Thanks for reading.
  7. i think unless you make the news (in the infamous, not famous way), then you're fine as long as you don't get into a fraud situation like twocosmicfish mentioned above. i also think grad school tends to draw smart, overly-reflective people who tend to be hard on themselves and that the application process doesn't help. i'd like to say, "lighten up!" but then I'd be a hypocrite ; ) but seriously, make an effort to envision your new life at grad school going great just before you fall asleep each night. and maybe get a massage!
  8. If you've gotten in off of a waitlist (I see you on the results page!) please share your victory here! There are a lot of us who need some vicarious excitement. And if you think you influenced the adcom decision in some way, do tell! Congratulations. . .
  9. The original request was to be thoughtful. . . Which includes not only letting go of offers you know you won't accept, but maybe even being thoughtful in your reply here. I'm on a waitlist and the worst part about it is the utter lack of control. I viewed this post as an attempt to influence (in an abstract way) what at this point feels like the force of fate. Giving a slight push back. . . And of course there are people out there treating this as a game. It happened to me in high school. One of my best friends applied to my top choice school "just to see" if she could get in-- actually said she'd never go there. This happened to be a school that explicitly stated they compare applicants from the same schools. While I thought I was the better fit for the college (in part because I actually knew everything about it!) I was up against the valedictorian who was graduating at 16. She got in. Maybe I wouldn't have anyway, but it was terrible to have to wonder. . . Anyway, I think this process induces paranoia on both sides. Those on the waitlist worry that there are people out there hanging on to offers for no good reason. Those with the offers are worried about making the wrong choice or sealing the deal for one reason or another. I hate that the answer to almost every question on here is "be patient. be calm. think about the other parts of your life." but it's usually the best response.
  10. I posted this in the Ed forum as well, but figured more people would see it here: I'd love some outside opinions on my dilemma (emphasis on opinions as I don't think there's a clearcut answer): I am on a waitlist for the one program I applied to (this is for a master's). At first I was devastated, but after some investigation it seemed promising that I could be offered a place. I have spent a lot of time thinking/researching more about the program, and the school in general, as well as what I would like to do there and after graduation. After some serious reflection (and some changes in my life) it dawned on me that the waitlist is a blessing. This time in limbo has allowed me to realize there is a different program within the same school that suits me better-- maybe the admissions committee even saw that. Thinking about my essay, it makes more sense as an application to the other program. So maybe I won't be offered admission from the waitlist, in which case I'll apply for the other program next year. BUT! Here is where I need your opinions: Do you think it make sense to contact the grad coordinator of my current program (I have emailed with him before) and inquire if I could attempt to switch tracks now and contact the program coordinator for the other program? They sometimes allow admitted students to do that, even thought it's rare. Is this a stupid idea? I'm just thinking that if I'm offered a spot I would take it, it's just that the other program is a better fit. . . but in terms of my personal life this year would be a much better year for grad school, so I am also wary of hurting my chances of getting off the waitlist. I can take some of the same courses if I an admitted to the first program and ultimately, the degree is the same, but the focus could be better tailored to my interests if I could switch tracks. Thoughts?
  11. Hi, I've worked with people at ITP before and they were all fantastic, well-connected, and smart. I think the program is pretty tight-nit, reputable and growing. The facilities are nice too. The first thing you need to do though, is get with your people! You should start reading design blogs (and the websites of firms like IDEO or wherever you might want to work) and go to events held by PSFK, go to Pecha Kucha nights and just talk to people in the design world about where they studied, interned, what they do, and how they got their current job. The design world (especially in NYC) is competitive and you can only be helped by who you know and where you go! http://www.pecha-kucha.org/cities/new-york http://www.psfk.com/ http://www.ideo.com/ And a great blog to get your head in the game (written by big guns, although more graphic designers, they cover a lot of ground): http://designobserver.com/index.html Hope that helps. Good luck and have fun!
  12. I second HisRoyalHighness on contacting the GLBT group on campus. He also shouldn't be afraid to try Craiglist in the Bay Area or be afraid to talk about who he is and an ideal roommate on a campus housing board. Another option is for him to arrive early, sublet for a month and get involved in volunteer activities at Berkeley or in SF (the opportunities abound!) and maybe meet a great roommate. I think it's hard to communicate just how different (as in how far ahead) San Francisco and the Berkeley campus is from the majority of the U.S. in this regard, even major cities. I'm sure your friend will love UCB. I lived in SF for the past 3.5 years and have several happy homo friends at Berkeley!
  13. Await

    Waitlists

    Congratulations! I'm presently surprised that I'm vicariously happy for you ; )
  14. April 15th sucks. THIS, Tax Day, the Titanic Sinking, Abraham Lincoln dying. . . my birthday. I've even been hospitalized on my birthday. It tends to be a bad day. (On a waitlist, feeling a little pessimistic. Can you tell?)
  15. I think schools understand--and are prepared for--these situations. I'm on a waitlist and they said we could expect to hear as late as July 31st. I know for a fact someone was accepted for the program last year in MID August. So there is certainly waitlist shuffling. Ultimately, you're only taking one spot, not two, and although I am personally relieved to hear that other students are so considerate, I don't think it's your responsibility to worry about eating up a place in a program. The onus is on the program to try to offer a spot to all the qualified applicants that would like to go. So the sad reality is, the waitlist ordeal can go on all summer. Don't hate the player, hate the game!
  16. Yay! I've been rooting for you! And just so you know, I think if you hadn't gotten in anywhere, you'd have just as many, if not more, encouraging, sincere comments. You're a great part of gradcafe! And one of the few real faces (to me that's brave).
  17. Hi amazingrace, Have you tried calling/emailing? It seems like most people have been hearing *something* when they've pinged departments at this stage in the game. Try the grad coordinator on Monday?
  18. Await

    Waitlists

    Hurrah! Very happy for you! May this thread be filled with acceptances soon. . . I read in another thread that RecycledViking also got in, so here's to hoping for the rest of us. . .
  19. No. At least not for master's. When PhD applicants are rejected, I think the onus is on the professor they've been talking with to shed some light on the situation, but as a courtesy/act of human kindness/empathy for the experience, not because it's required. If a professor doesn't take the time to do that, maybe you wouldn't have wanted to work with them anyway. I think the fees we pay are in line with how much time and work happens behind the scenes, not even for each of our individual applications, but to keep the whole system running. As others have pointed out, feedback would only slow down the operation even more. In addition, feedback would have to be standardized/fair, so in the end you'd be likely to get some point calculation which would then reveal more than the admissions committee would like about the process, probably including the fact that it is, to a certain degree, arbitrary. It seems like almost every program has more qualified applicants than they can admit. For example: When my dad applied to veterinary school he was rejected from his top choice (he had even moved to that state and lived there for a year to establish residency and increase his chances. He also had great grades from Columbia and operating experience). He was shocked when he was rejected and actually got a meeting with the dean. The dean said, "I can't give you a reason why you were rejected because there isn't one. You're perfectly well qualified. We just have a small number of spaces compared to the number of people that deserve them. It's a crapshoot at that point." And then apparently he mimed piles of applications and randomly plucking a few from them. Plus, it's a valuable exercise to go over your application and reflect about the fit with your school. If you know the fit was right and your application wasn't lacking, then console yourself with anecdotes like this about what an arbitrary, imperfect process it is and apply again. If you realize you could improve upon your application or even that the fit was wrong, well then you've have had a valuable exercise in self-reflection and in small way, you've benefited from the rejection (or even gotten what you deserved). As an aside: Are application fees tax deductible? That would be a nice salve if they could at least be treated like a donation to the school.
  20. Just wanted to thank you for the most valuable post I've read on Grad Cafe! And it ended up being great that it was in this forum-- unexpected and I might not have found it otherwise. Best of luck, I'm sure you'll prosper anywhere you go.
  21. Oh, I'm sorry, that sucks. It has happened to me before because of stress. It's called Blepharospasm-- and Botox is a cure! (I didnt' go that route, just waited it out but it lasted like a week). As for me: I told myself that if I didn't get in I would do the Mount Desert Island marathon. Since I got waitlisted (applied one place) I guess that means I need to start training. Anyone want to start a Grad Cafe running team? haha. http://www.mdimarathon.org/
  22. Pass the mead! Thank you for not only giving me hope (applied to one place, on the waitlist), but also for taking a pause to celebrate with the forum. Congratulations. I hope I can write the same kind of post someday soon!
  23. Pass the mead! Thank you for not only giving me hope (applied to one place, on the waitlist), but also for taking a pause to celebrate with the forum. Congratulations. I hope I can write the same kind of post someday soon!
  24. Await

    Cornell '09?

    I second Novarr-Mackesey. They have a really nice mix of houses, everywhere you'd want to be, and they were always responsive and fair. A lot of the slumlords are individuals rather than companies and are hard to pin down. Having a physical location to take your complaints/questions to is helpful. The NM office is just off State St. There are also some really sweet places tucked along the gorge in College Town- convenient, private, beautiful. One brick building in particular that I always wished I had gotten in on. . . Aww, I'm missing it! Go to Cornell! There are probably reasons you haven't even considered yet: Like the on-campus bowling alley, ice cream factory, and hotel (with amazing Sunday brunch)! So many people are studying such a wide variety of things, you'll always come across something weird when you least expect it. Like one time the Ag School had a plant sale (all the plants were like $1-2). They had grown them from seeds that had been locked away for 50 years! They hadn't even ID'd the plant I bought yet. Plus, you've got the wine tours, the state parks, swimming in the gorges. . . And oh yes, who doesn't feel studious here? http://66.194.64.244/view/0284/p_28475.jpg
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