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Guest Guest

Hey there,

There is no need to have a car in New York. The public transport is very good and can take you everywhere, and almost anytime since it works 24 hours. Most students who have cars live far away in Jersey (not Jersey City or Hoboken), Connecticut, or upstate NY. Additionally, other people I know who drive cars live in the Bronx, Long Island, or way to the north in Manhattan, but do not really use their cars on a daily basis.

It is very hard to find parking on the streets in Manhattan, specially in some areas downtown. Additionally, if you want to leave your car somewhere and pay for it, the price per hour may range from $17-$25 per hour, so it really makes no sense.

Good luck!

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Guest SIPA

Thanks for the replies everyone. I'm very aware that I shouldn't have a car in NYC but unfortunately I'm stuck with it. I cannot sell it, as the original owner may want it back upon return to NY, which won't be for another 2 years - just enough to finish my degree at Columbia. Long story. Anyway, for the students who DO have cars, where do they keep them? Parking is a nightmare and of course very expensive. Advice?

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Guest former NewYorker

Commuting to New York is not worth the hassle, in my opinion. If you're only going to be in New York for two years, take advantage of the ability to live in a really great city. It is also possible to have a car in Brooklyn, Queens, or Jersey City, in fact quite nice because you have the option to use a car to go to the grocery store or on road trips, but are still close enough to take public transportation in on a daily basis. So, I say, ditch the car at your relative's house and live in the heart of NYC, or in an outer borough!

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Guest former New Yorker

In parts of Brooklyn, Queens, or Jersey City you can park on the street. I've known people who've owned cars in Williamsburg and Jersey City and had no big problems. Sometimes, you have to drive around a bit depending on your exact location, but parking does exist.

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Guest Guest

If you live outside of Manhattan (Brooklyn or Queens are your best bet) you can park the car on the street. Some days you may need to park a couple of blocks away, and others you might need to move them at certain hours because of the garbage pick up, but you shouldn't have much of a problem. Living in Manhattan can be a little bit more difficult; although you may still find a place to park on the street. It will not be easy specially downtown Manhattan, and midtown but uptown (where Columbia is and around) might be a better place for a car.

So, my advise, is that if you HAVE to take your car with you, just park it around your building and only use it to go out of the city to a Mall in LI or Jersey (not that you really want to though), or to Boston or DC, etc. But not to hang around in the city or going to school -- unless you live extremely far away from it.

Good luck. You'll have so much fun in NY

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Guest SIPA

Thanks again. What about the Bronx? What neighborhoods do SIPA or Columbia students tend to live in? I know Washington Heights was mentioned, was wondering if there were any others in the outer boroughs that may have parking for my car. Would I be eligible for any of the rent-controlled housing in the area?

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Guest Guest

People from SIPA that I know, live on campus in Columbia area. Other Columbia students who are not living on campus, live on the upper east, Washington Heights, and Astoria (in Queens). I think those are the most convenient places to live as a Columbia student since they are closer to the campus; although I also know people who lived in Williamsburg, Brooklyn the whole time they spent at Columbia. I also know one person who lives in the Bronx, although I cannot tell you about it because I've never been there.

My guess is that in most of those areas you can find a place to park your car on the streets. Although in Columbia area and the upper east it might be harder.

I know that Columbia housing is pretty good, and some of those dorm-like apts. are very cheap so you may want to take a look at them. Otherwise, if you want to find a cheap apartment Queens or Washington Heights might be a better bet for you. Nevertheless, I've also heard that in the upper east you can find som every good deals, just be careful not getting to much into the north-east because it gets a bit shady. The west side may be a bit better, but there are also some shady neighborhoods. I tend to like the buidings on riverside, right on the north of that avenue you can find some cheap deals, although I doubt you will be capable of findinf some of those rent-controlled apts. People just do not leave them.

Of course, you can always try living with a roomate; it helps a lot, and most people do it here. Also, I am sure Columbia has a housing database where landlords, roomates, and tenants, announce themselves.

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Guest guest

If you go far enough north, parts of the Bronx are very nice. But not near the city. Finding an apartment in NY is tricky, as you probably know. If you find something good, take it on the spot or you will lose it. Look at craig's list. Consider using a broker if you can afford it. I had rent controlled apartments uptown but they are really hard to find without actually being there. Parking in Washington Heights and Harlem is also possible. For Columbia, definately try to be near a red line (subway) stop so you don't have to transfer; it makes a huge difference in time and stress level.

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Guest guest

(adding to previous post)

There is also a subway stop with blue and orange (A/C and B/D) lines, but as I found when I was there, to get to it you have to go down a hill through a park to get to the stop. Which sounds nice, right, except it leads into the infamous shady side of Columbia. It's fine in the day, but I got a little nervous doing it at night, in the winter. The red line is slower, but the stop at Columbia is safer.

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Guest Annieee

Hello! Is anyone familiar with Whittier Hall? (Housing for Teachers College). Would anyone recommend it or have any info about it?

Thanks so much!

:wink:

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Guest ellie
Just found out I got into NYU! Does anybody know anything about NYUs grad housing? Will a 23K stipend be enough to survive NYC?

I've been working in NYC for the past two years making about 21K/yr - 23 is doable. Easier than 21. ;) You'll be fine so long as you make a good budget for yourself.

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Guest ayalarain

Hi everyone. I got accepted to SIPA, and I am looking for housing. Should I do the on-campus housing or no? I have a friend who lives in NYC, and so I am seriously considering just getting a place with her. I don't know how good Columbia's grad housing is. I do not want to live in a dorm however, and the idea of living with strangers reminds me too much of undergrad, to be honest. I would like a studio or a to share a room in an apt, but I would prefer to know who I am living with.... what are your ideas on all of this? I heard Astoria, Washington Heights, and the area around Columbia would be ideal. I am totally not familiar with NYC, and so I need someone to tell me about the geography and price ranges of these places.... I have about a grand per month for housing. So, I need to make it last.

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Guest itsme

Does anybody know anything about NYU grad housing? I'm not sure if I should apply for it in case I have problems finding an apartment from across the country. Their application deadline is June 1st and they want a $1000 deposit. Is NYU grad housing in high demand or competitive? I'm wondering if I can wait until late May to apply and still have a chance if I need it....

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Guest MeToo

The NYU graduate housing deadline was May 5th for 1st year fellowship PhD students. They had to receive the official application and security deposit then. They said housing is limited, hence the priority given to these students. I already sent in my application and fee, for one of the Stuyvesant Town 2-bedrooms.

Call them and check. You might make it for the rest of the residences.

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Guest kn0519

i was just wondering for those who have cars and will be moving to NYC for grad school, what do you plan to do with it? i had planned to sell mine but now i'm starting to wonder if it would be better to leave it at someone's house (in another state) so i can have something to drive on breaks from school etc.

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Yes, I am. Although not 100% decided. I've been meaning to post here for a while but have been too scared about reading a barrage of responses saying how impossible it is to live there as a student! What you planning on for housing?

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i've been a student living in the nyc area for years. and unemployed, too, for several months. it's not impossible to live in new york. you just have to be willing to make compromises (not be set on living within walking distance of campus or living entirely alone) and put in the effort. actually, in some ways it might be easier to live in the nyc area than other places because transportation is good and everyone lives in apartments.

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Yes, I am. Although not 100% decided. I've been meaning to post here for a while but have been too scared about reading a barrage of responses saying how impossible it is to live there as a student! What you planning on for housing?

Nah, it is not impossible to live in nyc as a student. I have two good, long time highschool friends who went there for undergrad who did just fine. If they can do it... I know I can do it, possibly better! However, they stay home most of the time... I'm more outgoing so I will need to balance my $$ carefully.

About housing, I will do apt sharing/roommates; I can't afford Chelsea, Greenwich or any of those areas near NYU. Brooklyn is where I plan to go on room-hunting. Queens I believe is too far, even in Sunnyside or Astoria. How my roommate/s will be is pretty unpredictable (and kind of scary for me). Oh and of course... trying to find a room with A WINDOW and a decent Closet at an affordable price. Haha.

What about you?

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i've been a student living in the nyc area for years. and unemployed, too, for several months. it's not impossible to live in new york. you just have to be willing to make compromises (not be set on living within walking distance of campus or living entirely alone) and put in the effort. actually, in some ways it might be easier to live in the nyc area than other places because transportation is good and everyone lives in apartments.

So true. NYC's public transportation gets you almost everywhere (when I was in Miami, I had to get a car).

The down side of not owning a car is when going out at night, coming back home. I need to find a place where it is safe for me to walk on the streets pass 12.

I wonder, how do new yorkers do it? haha. Taxi? I'll be broke before Thanksgiving.

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. . .

as for getting home at night, a lot of people just take the subway at all times of the night. whether that will be plausible (or intelligent) for your situation depends on where your apartment is and who you are. how *you* feel about walking around there at night is the most important factor, because if you don't feel safe you won't be happy. of course, you don't want to feel overly safe and get mugged (or worse). anyway, no matter what you're making, you shouldn't have to compromise your safety. having to take a taxi isn't necessarily going to make you poor, but you have to balance the taxi costs with apartment costs.

as for good places to live for an nyu student, i think you have the right idea about looking in brooklyn. you might be surprised with the quality of the apartments if you really look, though. almost all bedrooms have windows, although i've stayed in one without . . but that was a special situation. ($300/mo. in greenwich village.) i'd also look in alphabet city (that's on the east side of manhattan). i know a lot of people who lived in that area and paid about $600 for sharing a 1 bedroom. (that is, each person gets their own room.) if you really want, you can get places that price in the east village, too. i'd suggest jersey city, but not if you like to go out a lot. but i think it'd be worth your while to at least look a little in manhattan, at least as a point of reference. (so you know what you'll be losing and gaining by living in brooklyn.)

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...anyway, no matter what you're making, you shouldn't have to compromise your safety. having to take a taxi isn't necessarily going to make you poor, but you have to balance the taxi costs with apartment costs.

as for good places to live for an nyu student, i think you have the right idea about looking in brooklyn. you might be surprised with the quality of the apartments if you really look, though. almost all bedrooms have windows, although i've stayed in one without . . but that was a special situation. ($300/mo. in greenwich village.) i'd also look in alphabet city (that's on the east side of manhattan). i know a lot of people who lived in that area and paid about $600 for sharing a 1 bedroom. (that is, each person gets their own room.) if you really want, you can get places that price in the east village, too. i'd suggest jersey city, but not if you like to go out a lot. but i think it'd be worth your while to at least look a little in manhattan, at least as a point of reference. (so you know what you'll be losing and gaining by living in brooklyn.)

Thanks for the suggestions :) I'll look into the places you mentioned.

I have visited friends in nyc, who all happen to live in manhattan. I have more or less an idea of how "cozy" the apts tend to get and at what price. However I'll still look at all places available, like you said, to have a point of reference.

Maybe this question sounds lame: The cost of living in manhattan should more than brooklyn right? Apart from rent, but in supplies ( ie groceries), eating out, etc.

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Maybe this question sounds lame: The cost of living in manhattan should more than brooklyn right? Apart from rent, but in supplies ( ie groceries), eating out, etc.

that's not a bad question. it can actually vary a lot by what part of manhattan/brooklyn you are in and your eating habits. there are some cheap grocery places in manhattan, as well as expensive. i'd assume that brooklyn is a little cheaper for the most part (like jersey city), but i'm not sure. as for eating out, manhattan benefits from having such a large variety. there are lots of places outside of manhattan where you'll have a tough time finding somewhere cheap to eat that isn't fast food, while manhattan has some places with great deals. from my experience, i might say that it's easier to get good cheap restaurant food in manhattan than almost anywhere else i've been in the u. s.

and remember that there are more expensive parts of brooklyn, too.

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