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orinincandenza

The Worst Time to Quit Smoking...

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Is probably the Novemeber before you hear back from graduate schools. I'm not sure why I picked Nov 08, and I'm really not sure why it was the first successful attempt in 6 years of smoking and two of trying to quit. But I haven't had a cigarette in almost three months, and I'm checking and rechecking my (e)mail constantly, and sometimes, I just really want a tiny relapse. Anyone else tempted to resort to the worst habit during admission decision purgatory?

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maybe you've replaced smoking w/refreshing your email?

I'm sure it has been hard, but congrats! Pretty soon you'll get to the point where smoking and smokers disgust you, which I've heard from former smoker friends is the big turning point.

ETA: my habit, nail-biting :(

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Thanks e'rybody. It has been tough, but I feel noticeably better all the time, except for the rare craving. Nail-biting and TV-watching seem perfectly acceptable ways of coping; anybody else have suggestions for stress relief?

Rip a bong with Phelps.

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I'm quitting after my first acceptance (assuming one comes!). I'd be WAY to stressed out otherwise. But congrats and stay strong OP. Remember that "just one cigarette" leads to the next and the next and the next.

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oh man, NOW i feel bad. I quit at the end of september and took it up again in december. too much stress. also a trip to france didnt help. i figure theres not much point quitting now - my concentration wouldnt really be up to it. if i get in, ill quit for sure. if i dont, cigarettes will probably be my only consolation. 20,000 cigarettes and a bottle of wine. :!:

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I also chose a high stress time to quit smoking (2 1/2 years ago). I think that when you feel like something is so out of your control (ie. your applications), it helps to have something that IS totally under your control (you not smoking). I found that working out really helped me not to relapse - it made quitting smoking just one part of getting healthier. And now that I sound like a public service announcement, I'll stop.

Keep up the good work.

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