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States that allow limited licensure (Masters)


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I am assuming you mean licensing to practice as a therapist or counselor?

All 50 states allow for licensure as a professional counselor/mental health counselor but you have to have taken specific coursework or graduated from a CACREP accredited masters program. I would suggest you talk to your adviser at school and/or search the state you are interested in for their licensure requirements. You can also look here http://www.counseling.org/Counselors/LicensureAndCert.aspx for more info.

Good luck!

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I'm referring to a limited license psychologist, in which you can be licensed (in Michigan) after receiving M.A./M.S. in clinical psychology and work under a doctoral-level psychologist. I know there's also degrees for mental health counseling, marriage and family, and the like, but I need more info on the limited license please.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Last time I checked you'll have to check with the licensing bodies in each state individually and manually. I know the Canadian psychological association has published a list of licensing requirements per province, but last time I checked (albeit ~2 years ago) there was nothing comparable for the States.

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Many students beginning predoctoral internship in some states are required to be licensed at the master's level. Kansas has licensed masters level psychologists, Arkansas has licensed psychological examiners, Texas has licensed psychological associates, California has registered psychologists and most other states have master's level licensure. One advantage from holding these master's level licensure during your predoctoral internship is taking the EPPP and either passing at the master's level or doctoral level. If you pass at the doctoral level you will not have to take it over when you are applying for your doctoral level psychology license.

Edited by ChampB12
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  • 5 months later...

Thank you everyone for you input. I have since discovered that every state, except OH, allows some sort of licensure at the master's level in psychology, whether you're just allowed to do assessment or you may do therapy under supervision...each state has something of the sort....except OH...the state I am from and plan to move back to after I finish my master's. They only, only, only, no exceptions, allow masters in psych to work as a psych assistant or various other jobs (that you're also eligible to do with just a B.A./B.S). You can get licensed as an LPC of course, but that's not for me/not what my M.S. is.

boo hoo.

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  • 9 months later...

Thanks. I as seeking the same information. I live in Las Vegas...tgey are ridiculous here with licensure requirements and just as corrupt as ever, in my opinion.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Chontella and others on this thread: It is in fact difficult to find info (all in one place) about the licensing opportunities in different states for master's degreed psychologists. I will give you some links.

 

First let me tell you that I have been a Licensed Psychologist Associate in Oregon for 13 years. I have a masters degree in clinical psychology. Oregon's system is a two tiered system with both supervised and independent Psychologist Associates. The supervision requirements are extensive. 3 years to get the first tier license, and then 3 more years of supervision to get an independent license. At the point of getting an independent license, the Licensed Psychologist Associate is awarded all the privileges of a doctoral degreed Licensed Psychologist. Insurance companies reimburse us at the same rate as Licensed Psychologists which is considerably more than all other masters degreed mental health professionals (i.e. LPC's, LCSW's, etc).

 

You may contact the Oregon Board of Psychologist Examiners through their website at http://www.oregon.gov/OBPE/Pages/index.aspx.

 

There is a list of sorts of the various masters degreed psychologist types on a page of the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB) which is primarily designed to show what scores are required for the Exam for the Practice of Professional Psychology (EPPP) for the license types by state. http://www.asppb.org/HandbookPublic/Reports/default.aspx?ReportType=EPPPPassingScore

 

The National Association of Masters in Psychology (NAMP) may be more descriptive, but not exceptionally so. Still, it's worth a look. http://www.enamp.org/PDF/Licensure%20Information%20NAMP.pdf

 

You may also contact me at criticalinking@gmail.com. I am interested in all things related to masters degreed psychologists. 

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