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San Diego, CA

housing cost of living things to do transportation USC

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133 replies to this topic

#1 mox

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Posted 09 March 2006 - 07:29 AM

I did my undergrad at UCSD and am fairly familiar with the social and academic scenes at SDSU and USD if you have an questions fire away.
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#2 enoksrd

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Posted 09 March 2006 - 07:57 AM

Alright, I am considering the math PhD program at UCSD. I would like to know if commuting by bike is possible (I don't want to get a car), if there are farmer's markets or other natural food stores (e.g. co-ops) in La Jolla, what the public transportation is like, and if it would be reasonable to live off of a TA salary (which should be about $1700/month).

Please add anything you think might be of interest. The more the merrier.

Thanks!
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#3 mox

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Posted 09 March 2006 - 07:01 PM

Biking
Commuting is possible as long as you live "west of the 5" as UCSD is west of the 5, UTC is where msot people live which is about 3 miles farther and east of the 5, however the condos "west of the 5" are very clsoe and bkiking is very easy and I did it as an undergrad. The following ar elisted by their proximity to UCSD. Also west of the 5 condos are walking distance to the La Jolla Viallage Square which has ralphs, traders joes, ticket master and a ton of small shops and markets.

West of The 5 - rent on my one bedroom is 1,500 ( I actually bought mine so its a mortage but rent is similar)
Archstone La Jolla

Villa Tuscana La Jolla

Villa La jolla Condos

East of The 5

Nobel Court

VErano La Jolla

Costa Verde Apartments - most live here here.

Side note; A very convient 7am to 11pm ucsd bus runs to all these places from ucsd and back.

Food

trader Joes and another health store (natures choice?)are located in La Jolla Village square which is right next to UCSD and the west of the 5 condos, features food, bars like rock bottom and el torito and shopping etc), their are some in La Jolla but biking to thsoe areas is a bit tough, UCSD does have a farmers market every week and co-ops located on campus (word is they are being shut down though)

Living Expenses
1,700 is enough with a roomate, however living in La Jolla is very expensive 92037 is an expensive area code, across the freeway in UTC rent is a bit cheaper but still youre looking at 1,3oo for rent on a one bedroom.

Social

Unless youre going to UCSD as it offers something amazing...it plain sucks. I hate to complain but the social life is non existent and the kdis are mal-adjusted...however that said if youre outgoing there are many awesome things to do in SD....these saying might give you a hint on social life "9 out of 10 chicks in sd are hot, the 10th goes to ucsd." and " i love SD to bad I hate UCSD" are thigns kids say a ton, to the point its made its way into urban dictionarys and stuff.



- sorry for the spelling and grammar I am rushing to work =P
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#4 Amatricis

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Posted 09 March 2006 - 09:55 PM

If you live by yourself, you're looking at VERY steep rent (I'm living in a 1b/1ba and I'm at $1100/month). Apartment complexes that have studios start around $1000/month. Once you opt to live with others, then rent will significantly decrease. Most apartment complexes at most cover hot water. Everything else is out of your pocket.

UCSD also has affiliated housing for grad students/staff/etc.....there are waitlists for these, but you could consider looking into it (http://hds.ucsd.edu).

And I don't agree that you have to be on the west side of the 5 to bike to school. I know plenty of people who live on the east of the 5 and bike to school. I'd say if you live anywhere accessible to the free student shuttles mentioned above, you can bike it, too.

There's a Trader Joe's, a Whole Foods nearby. If you can go further (i.e. if you end up w/ a car) there's a Henry's Market Place, too.

Estimating...I live by myself, I spent maybe $1500-$1700 a month on everything (rent, food, utilities, etc) combined.
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#5 Guest__*

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 02:20 AM

If you live by yourself, you're looking at VERY steep rent (I'm living in a 1b/1ba and I'm at $1100/month). Apartment complexes that have studios start around $1000/month. Once you opt to live with others, then rent will significantly decrease. Most apartment complexes at most cover hot water. Everything else is out of your pocket.

UCSD also has affiliated housing for grad students/staff/etc.....there are waitlists for these, but you could consider looking into it (http://hds.ucsd.edu).

And I don't agree that you have to be on the west side of the 5 to bike to school. I know plenty of people who live on the east of the 5 and bike to school. I'd say if you live anywhere accessible to the free student shuttles mentioned above, you can bike it, too.

There's a Trader Joe's, a Whole Foods nearby. If you can go further (i.e. if you end up w/ a car) there's a Henry's Market Place, too.

Estimating...I live by myself, I spent maybe $1500-$1700 a month on everything (rent, food, utilities, etc) combined.


I agree you can bike to a bus stop living east of the 5 and perhaps UCSD itself. My only issue is the campus is so large that biking that extra mile from over there isnt that far but when you have to bike the extra mile and then bike through campus to say RIMAC it can get a bit far. However Amatricis is correct that you can bike from east of the 5 if you wanted.
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#6 Guest_newbie_bio_*

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Posted 12 March 2006 - 07:42 AM

Hi mox,
I m planning to accept a 26K/yr offer ar UCSD Biology Grad. I think it should suffice, do you?
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#7 mox

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 10:32 PM

Hi mox,
I m planning to accept a 26K/yr offer ar UCSD Biology Grad. I think it should suffice, do you?


If they give you cheaper housing that would help. My girl is in a bio program at another UC she receives 29-30k (29,800 I think), pays 500 a month for UC housing and it still runs a bit tight in southern california.
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#8 Guest_jodequa_*

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 04:29 PM

Excuse my ignorance, but is that figure including tuition/fees, or not?

I'll be getting about 15 k as a TA at UCSD, and I'm wondering just how much more it's gonna cost me to live! (guess i should've gone into the sciences instead!)

Also, other than Hillcrest, are there any liberal/progressive neighborhoods I should look at?

Thanks!
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#9 mox

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 09:10 PM

[quote name="jodequa"]Excuse my ignorance, but is that figure including tuition/fees, or not?

I'll be getting about 15 k as a TA at UCSD, and I'm wondering just how much more it's gonna cost me to live! (guess i should've gone into the sciences instead!)

Also, other than Hillcrest, are there any liberal/progressive neighborhoods I should look at?

Thanks![/quote/]

Jodequa,

For my girl a mollecular bio Ph.D she received full tuition funding (free ride) and 29k a year in pay, I figure the bio guy at ucsd got the same thing. As far as other progressive and artys towns Ocean Beach is pretty nice.
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#10 Guest_newbie_bio_*

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 11:30 PM

Excuse my ignorance, but is that figure including tuition/fees, or not?

I'll be getting about 15 k as a TA at UCSD, and I'm wondering just how much more it's gonna cost me to live! (guess i should've gone into the sciences instead!)

Also, other than Hillcrest, are there any liberal/progressive neighborhoods I should look at?

Thanks!


The fees are waived. In addition I get 26K/year. And health insurance etc. Hope this helps!
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#11 Guest_MeggieB_*

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 05:58 AM

Someone above mentioned the affiliated grad student housing. Considering my stipend is only 15K, it seems attractive. I looked at the website, but does anyone have more info about it? How nice are the apts? How hard is it to get one? Etc.

Any inside info would be most appreciated.
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#12 canuck

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 01:44 AM

Sooo, is it just me or is any 1 bedroom apartment in La Jolla 1200+? Where do all the grad students live?!?!
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Yes : UCSD

#13 LaraAnn85

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 04:03 AM

Sooo, is it just me or is any 1 bedroom apartment in La Jolla 1200+? Where do all the grad students live?!?!


I've been here for 5 years (undergrad) and I never see grad students. I lived in a complex where there were a few, but it was all undergrads it would be a horrible place to live. I moved out because I couldn't take it anymore. I would suggest University City or Clairmont if you want something affordable and close. If you're willing to commute, Ocean Beach or Northpark are my favorite areas. San Diego is a family town....a wealthy family town....it's hard to find affordable places with youngish people. That said, I will be sad to leave this fall :cry:
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#14 ampersand

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 10:29 PM

I went to the political science recruiting day last week and stayed with a couple of current grad students. They live in a graduate housing complex called Miramar, and from what they said it's pretty easy for first-year grad students to get in there (they recommended putting in an application as soon as you decide you're going to go there). The rent is about $650-$700 per month, unfurnished, two bedrooms/two bathrooms (although one of the bathrooms has a toilet and the other has a shower...a little weird). The complex was just built in the last couple of years, so everything's pretty new. There's also a shuttle stop nearby. It seems like a good option for at least the first year, since it's close to campus and relatively cheap.
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#15 canuck

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 05:24 AM

ah.. those rates are split.. they stick you with someone else. I was utterly baffled as to why they would build 2 bedroom apartments and charge 1200 for them.
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Yes : UCSD

#16 ewurgler

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 08:48 PM

Hey all,

I attended ucsd as an undergrad, have lived here for 5 years, and am dating someone who did undergrad and currently grad at ucsd. It is a fantastic school and place to live if you know the right things. Couple of notes:

Neighborhood:
Do not live in La Jolla. It is terribly rich, isolated, and hard to commute. The grad housing is ok in price, but you can get a much better deal if you are willing to drive a bit or shuttle to get to school. The neighborhoods I have lived in and recommend are:
South Park (15-20 mins to school). It is old with great prices, cute coffee shop, restaurants, bars, close to downtown, balboa park (museums, hiking trails), close to cheap grocery store.
North Park: Has a bit more "character," a bit louder, but still charming with great housing prices, tons of bars, old shops, coffee, walkable events. Close to balboa park and hillcrest.
Hillcrest The gay neighborhood, filled with unique and fantastic restaurants, bars, bookstores, coffee, close to balboa park, near a UCSD shuttle service. Slightly more expensive than north or south park.

San Diego has lots to do, extremely moderate weather, and is a surfers dream town. However, public transportation is nearly non-existent, and the area ucsd is located in is rich, stuffy and rather isolated.

That said, I loved undergrad and am looking forward to a new city for grad school. My boyfriend loved undergrad and loves grad (comm). But, if you like to watch the leaves change color, enjoying wearing scarves and cuddling up with hot coco, you will not like. It is honestly 80 degrees right now in january.
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#17 psycholinguist

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 05:18 AM

Very useful advice - thanks! I've been to SD a whole bunch of times, but always as a tourist; I never expected to be considering moving there! Heh.
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#18 nocturne

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 09:56 PM

psycholinguist, are you going to the open house at the end of the month?
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#19 psycholinguist

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 03:00 AM

No, unfortunately; by the time I received word of my acceptance there, I'd already committed to going to the one at the University of Toronto on the same dates. However, I've arranged to stop by UCSD separately in mid-March and talk to a couple of potential supervisors (Rachel Mayberry and Robert Kluender). Oh, and then go enjoy the beach for a bit before having to return to the frozen Northeast. * laughs *

I'm glad there's someone here going to it, though! Any reports on impressions of the department, the facilities, and so on would be much appreciated, even though I'll be there myself soon enough.
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#20 convex

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 06:20 PM

Hey all,
Neighborhood:
Do not live in La Jolla. It is terribly rich, isolated, and hard to commute. The grad housing is ok in price, but you can get a much better deal if you are willing to drive a bit or shuttle to get to school. The neighborhoods I have lived in and recommend are:
South Park (15-20 mins to school). It is old with great prices, cute coffee shop, restaurants, bars, close to downtown, balboa park (museums, hiking trails), close to cheap grocery store.
North Park: Has a bit more "character," a bit louder, but still charming with great housing prices, tons of bars, old shops, coffee, walkable events. Close to balboa park and hillcrest.
Hillcrest The gay neighborhood, filled with unique and fantastic restaurants, bars, bookstores, coffee, close to balboa park, near a UCSD shuttle service. Slightly more expensive than north or south park.


I am currently living and going to school in San Diego, and I live in La Jolla and don't mind it. There are several nice apartment complex within walking distance of UCSD. Since it's 70 degrees all year and only rains 10 inches a year, the ability to walk to campus is worth a lot. I would argue that it's worth paying a bit of a premium on rent (which you will) and being a bit isolated from restaurants and nightlife (which it is). You will be a pretty short bus ride to the nicest beach in town (La Jolla Shores). If you suspect that you'll be spending your Friday nights in the library anyway, save yourself some trouble and live in La Jolla. However, if you're the type of person who likes to go out a lot, I would second the Hillcrest recommendation.

A lot of people with families live in Clairemont, and this is a pretty good idea if you don't want to pay La Jolla prices but would like to be relatively close to campus. Clairemont is an inexpensive, quiet neighborhood, and from north Clairemont you can get to campus in 10 minutes or so.

This assumes you're going to UCSD. If it's SDSU, Hillcrest and North Park are the way to go either way. You can find a cheap apartment within walking distance of SDSU (in Talmadge, for example), but it's not a particularly desirable place to live -- not unsafe, just pretty lame.
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