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iamthesith4382

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  1. Potentially that could be a great person to ask. Especially if your programs are interested in you having some previous hands on experience!
  2. I have to agree with the above poster. If a professor feels that they cannot write a strong letter of recommendation, then you should find someone else. It is likely the professor feels they do not know you very well as a researcher or as an analytic thinker after just one course. If I were to ask someone in a different field though, I would make sure they are easily connected back to your area of study (e.g., asking a statistics professor for a letter when applying to a research intensive psychology graduate program). Another option is you could reach out to a professor that you struggled in
  3. Unfortunately, I do not know much about that specific program. However, I did apply to the UTSA psychology masters program. I found that they took their time in getting back to applicants (found that with all my Masters programs actually). However, if you are really friendly/polite, you can usually email the person in charge of applications for a more specific deadline of when they will get back to you. For example, I was waiting to hear back from Texas State, and I was nervous about it. I emailed and discovered they weren't even looking at applications for another week. I hope you hear back s
  4. I thought this post would be interesting and helpful to myself and other fellow Masters students. Does anyone have advice on how to make the most out of a Masters experience? What skills do you feel are important to develop to make yourself a better PhD applicant? Any advice is welcome!
  5. Perhaps I should have been more clear in my original post. I don't view myself as the next person to come up with Cohnen's d, but maybe that has more to do with confidence. I've actually done a fair amount of multilevel modeling for repeated measures data. It was the most enjoyable aspect of my research experience. In addition, I would look into apply item-response theory to personality measures and scales. I think people are getting hung up on my comment about not wanting to create my models. It was more of a misunderstanding in how I wrote it. I agree that a strong math background would
  6. Hi Spunky,

    I noticed your name come up a lot on the forums on Quantitative Psychology. I recently found out about that area of psychology (I used to be interested in Clinical), and I think my interests can be addressed really well by Quantitative. Specifically, I'm interested in the measurement involved in psychological disorders with particular emphasis on personality disorders. In addition, I'm interested in applying item response theory to these different measures. Looking at the slim information on quantitative online, I think my interest could be addressed much better in these programs than Clinical.

    Anyway, I'm getting off topic. My big question to you, is what can I do to improve my application beyond the basic have a good GRE, good GPA, etc.? I am not applying for programs until the Fall of 2017.

    Recently I spoke with a Quantitative professor that offered to teach me R in an independent study. Is that a good idea?

    I'll admit I don't have a calculus background beyond Calc I, but I do have a course on multivariate statistics. Do you think this will be a problem?

    My last question might be a kind of weird one. Is there anything that applicants say/do that is specifically a deal breaker in quant programs? 

    Thanks for taking the time! I've been having a lot of trouble finding answers to these questions. When you look online for information about clinical, there's an abundance of information, but not for quant.

    -Marieke

    1. spunky

      spunky

      I replied to your questions in your forum post so other people can look at them! :D

  7. I completed an undergraduate honor's thesis that is up for publication, and I am currently working on my master's thesis. Based on everyone's comments it would appear learning R is just a great skill in general. My honor's thesis did some multi-level modeling that was pretty cool, but i'm pretty sure I'll just be using a repeated measures ANOVA in my master's. I'm looking at the effectiveness of coping with stress/anxiety with personality/perfectionism as a moderator.
  8. Here's a bit of my background. Last year I applied to Clinical Psychology programs, but I did not get in (shocker). Instead I ended up going to a Masters program in Psychological Research to further beef up my research experience and cushion a 3.3 undergraduate GPA. In this program I took an advanced statistics course, and I thoroughly enjoyed it, and I think I'm pretty good at it. The professor teaching the course is a Quantitative Psychologist. Honestly I had never even heard of this area of psychology. This is likely to having gone to a tiny undergraduate university. I was really excited wh
  9. Here's a bit of my background. Last year I applied to Clinical Psychology programs, but I did not get in. Instead I ended up going to a Masters program in Psychological Research. In this program I took an advanced statistics course, and I thoroughly enjoyed it, and I think I'm pretty good at it. The professor teaching the course is a Quantitative Psychologist. Honestly I had never even heard of this area of psychology. This is likely to having gone to a tiny undergraduate university. I was really excited when I found out about this field because my favorite areas of psychology have always been
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