transmodalnut

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About transmodalnut

  • Rank
    Decaf

Profile Information

  • Application Season
    2017 Fall
  • Program
    Anthropology
  1. Best apps for grad school?

    True. I've noticed this as well. In my case I always look at the suggestions because sometimes suggestions from recent Spanish speaking sources appear (my focus is on Puerto Rico). This is great because we sometimes get stuck on only English speaking articles and forget there's this whole body of literature on the topic or on groups you're interested in if you just remember to search on another filter once in a while.
  2. Best apps for grad school?

    I agree. They're more or less the same thing, but I like the suggestions Mendeley makes for articles I might be interested in. If there is an article that I can't access through Mendeley always search for that title at Google Scholar (the best darn thing Google has ever invented). If not, then resort for a loan through your school's library. @AP's suggestion is also good. I used CamScanner all the time as an undergrad. @Val_nbc, I use and like Google Drive but I've found that it's not so fast at uploading and syncing my documents. I almost always just find it faster to email documents. Does anyone else have this issue? I remember for a class we used Box and I really liked it. They have a free version but if you're inactive I think they erase your account, at least I think that's what happened to mine anyway. For that, I would just suggest making a group library at Mendeley. Never been a fan of Dropbox for whatever reason. Google Calendar is a must, for remembering to do assignments and paying bills. There are probably apps for those two activities (or just get a planner) but with Google Calendar I make due.
  3. Accept Offer or Gain More Experience

    To me there is no wrong answer, but ultimately I decided to go where I felt wanted. You could always apply to the PhD later, just make sure you figure out how you'll afford the masters and if you're willing to study for more years then previously thought. Or take the year, whatever makes sense for you.
  4. Accept Offer or Gain More Experience

    What's your end goal? In my case I applied to both masters and PhD programs, thinking that if I didn't get in a PhD, maybe having a masters would make me a stronger candidate. If I did this I would basically be doing a second masters cause the first one wouldn't count for the PhD degree. If your goal is to get a PhD and now you know what you need to get one, then I would take the year and just do as much as possible, like fieldwork, volunteer at museums, attend conferences, etc. Now if you think the masters would also better your chances then that also sounds good, just make sure to do fieldwork over the summer or volunteer work. Also, I took a year after my BA so as to be sure that grad school was what I wanted. I took some classes (sign language, has to do with my topic) and entered essay competitions, and received an honorable mention, both things I could add to my cv. So time off is not always a waste. It gave me clarity and determination. I don't regret it.
  5. admission without assistantship

    Explain to the grad coordinator that you are very interested but are in need of funding. Ask them what are your options. If no funding is available, and you don't have other offers, then yeah, by the time they start interviewing for assistantships it will all be enrolled students. Asking current students to me was vey helpfull. Even if they didn't TA, the must know of someone. Ask the coordinator or your POI for grad students who are willing to advice you.
  6. admission without assistantship

    Message people at the Department for advice. If they are confident that you'll be able to get an assistantship either there or at another department then I would feel free to accept. I won't know for sure about mine until May but I spoke to the people in charge of the program and they said I had a good chance. Ask current and past students what are the best departments to TA (not always your own). Just make sure it will cover your basics (especially if you're a non resident). I'm going through the same thing so ask everyone for advice. Hope this helps.
  7. Fall 2017 Applicants

    I accepted my offer at UCSD without visiting. I had a similar situation. I talked on the phone with my POI, his mentees, and messaged other faculty, so I felt pretty good in my decision, plus I couldn't get out of work commitments.
  8. TAship at UCSD?

    I was accepted into a graduate program at UCSD without funding, but was told that I would have a good chance of getting a TAship at another department (linguistics) given that I have a BA from a Spanish speaking institution and that since I'll be entering as a PhD student that I will have priority over other candidates. This TAship, I'm told by my graduate adviser, will cover my tuition (including my non resident one), plus roughly a $20,000 yearly salary and that they tend to last a year. Does anyone have any experience with these types of assistantships? Are they doable for first year students? I know SD is expensive and that not having funding for some is a no go, but my poi at UCSD is my academic soulmate and he even called me to say how he was looking forward to having me (most of his mentees are finishing up their degrees). Any advice would be immensely helpful.