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youngim

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    33
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About youngim

  • Rank
    Caffeinated

Profile Information

  • Interests
    Comparative Literature, Narrative Theory, Postcolonial Theory
  • Application Season
    2018 Fall

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  1. youngim

    5 or 6 years F-1 Visa?

    That makes sense! Looks like mine is also marked M Thanks
  2. youngim

    5 or 6 years F-1 Visa?

    So does this mean I need to go through a separate process to visit my home country and reenter the U.S. or would an up to date/signed I-20 and visa on my passport be sufficient when reentering the States?
  3. youngim

    5 or 6 years F-1 Visa?

    That's really informative! I was wondering about the back of the document too. I'll definitely keep up with the signing. By the way, did you have to pay another 4-500 dollars for the new visa? I guess that isn't a whole lot if it is only renewed once.
  4. I noticed that the dates written on my I-20 aren't the same as the offer I received. My official offer letter states that I would be fully funded for 6 years (the program runs for six years) but my I-20 only spans 5 years. Is this normal? Shouldn't my I-20 dates match the program length? I'm wondering if there might be a limitation to the number of years the I-20 can be issued. Any comments would be appreciated
  5. I see! That makes sense. Thanks, I now have access to the spreadsheet.
  6. Hey! Did someone lock up the spreadsheet?
  7. Congratulations @a_sort_of_fractious_angel!! What great news
  8. I see! Thanks for commenting. I think I was looking at the section called "Required annual income before taxes" on the living wage calculator. The "annual taxes' section just above it didn't seem right since it seems to be just about 18.5% of the annual income in the state that I selected, which is significantly more than the 10-12% you suggested Yes, as a foreign national I believe I am a non-resident alien, which means there may be some applicable tax treaty between my country and the United States. I'll have to look into this once I decide to accept the offer.
  9. I wonder if we should take into account that our tax rates may be different from a normal wage-earner. I am an international student so the tax treaty will impact my stipend, which means even though the ratio is significantly lower than 1, my post-tax stipend may actually be closer to 1, hence manageable. This may not apply to other nationals, but the impression I got was grad students do not pay as much tax in the States. Does anyone want to comment on the stipend tax situation? (not non-taxed fellowships)?
  10. How early should I move? I'm an international student so I will be planning ahead to a certain extent (visa prep etc), but I wouldn't don't want to arrive at the university two months ahead of time. I'd like some time to find an apartment, maybe find a used car, and in addition, I'll have to set up a bank account, driver's license, buy a phone etc. Would moving mid to late July be too late? Happy decision-making everyone!
  11. Congratulations!!! How exciting!!!
  12. I got into Oregon Comparative Lit and waitlisted at Carnegie Mellon! I'd be more than open to teach anywhere in the world, but I have been worrying a bit about placement. @ranny820 PM me sometime if you'd like to talk more about future prospects as international students. I agree! I am over the moon Just trying to make sense of all the different factors, including the fact that I am an international student who will again need to get visa-sponsored at some point etc. Also, should I fail to secure a position in the states, I keep hearing that it might be that much more difficult over here to work in an English department without a more traditional English degree.
  13. @ranny820 I feel like I'm in the same boat! I got into one school with full funding (comp lit) but I am waiting to hear from another waitlisted school (English). I feel very fortunate and I will take whatever offer I am given, but then again, I am also worried about placement after. Since I am an international student, I wonder if getting placed in the U.S. would be more difficult once I graduate. I don't see myself coming back to East Asia since my research interests may be too interdisciplinary for the very traditional English departments here. Would this mean I would have to look for other visa-sponsoring work while I'm in the U.S? Would I even get a visa for non-tenure track or CC positions? Waiting to hear back from about 7 other implied rejections so I am still holding off on a final decision.
  14. I see. Although I've also heard from other people that comparatists may not be hired in English departments but may be prized elsewhere (for instance French, East Asian, German Departments). Do you think your professor is basing his views on the hiring practices of English departments or all universities and departments in general?
  15. Ummm... Yes NRC rankings have been helpful to some extent. I guess I wanted to compare one school's English Department to another school's Comp Lit Department, but maybe they just aren't comparable. If the general reputation gap between the two schools were significant, maybe it wouldn't be so difficult choosing since I feel I would be able to do the research I want in both schools. Again, I feel like I am speculating about the future job market (of whether comp lit and eng lit would be more favorably received??), which may be futile at this point. I have been looking into Asian Universities (I live in East Asia), and I had the impression that an English Degree would be more valuable, but things may not be the same in the States now, or even in six years. In any case, I'll have to dig deeper into each school.
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