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How much can I save from my PhD stipend?

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I am in my second year of Masters and I am contemplating about applying for a PhD program next year. I am not sure about how much stipend I could get since it would vary in each university. But I want to calculate how much I would be able to save (to pay off my study loan). Again, I know it would depend on the number of months I am getting the stipend for and the living expenses according to the location of the university. 

I am currently in TU Delft and I know what my expenses are and the (possible) stipend I could get as a PhD candidate. I want a general estimate according to the experience of other PhD students in other universities.

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I think you're going to have a hard time finding the answer you're looking for because there is no standard saving amount. There are a few factors that impact this:

-Your stipend (which may or may not be the same as everyone else's in your cohort. Sometimes, people do bring in outside funding which increases their total funding. Sometimes, the university adjusts their funding if you have outside funding. Some limit it to a certain amount.)
-Cost of rent: Some people have no problem living with others to cut costs. Sometimes, you have no choice to share a house or apartment to be able to live on the stipend. Some people prefer living on their own and will invest to ensure that they don't have roommates. Having a pet or a family complicates things even more. Sometimes, there are two people earning an income; sometimes just one. Someone might pay $700 or so for rent while another person will pay $1300 to live in a more desired location with easier access to attractions or the university or for more space.
-Cost of food: Nobody in a single cohort will eat the same thing. Some prefer investing money in organic food or eating locally. Some people might only have access to one grocery store.
-Transportation: Not all universities provide free public transportation to their students. Sometimes, a car is needed. A car costs money and unexpected repairs might put a dent in savings. Having a car does offer you the mobility to get groceries whenever you'd like. A parking pass will cost more money at most universities. The cost of a parking pass varies significantly.
-Bills: Electricity + Gas aren't included as part of your monthly rent. This numbers vary depending on how often you need them. Cellphone and internet are other things you'll likely have to pay for.
-Books: Different courses require different books. Most people will take different classes.
-Conferences:  Local conferences can be cheap. Not all conferences will be local. Some might require a plane ride + hotel reservations. Some universities are generous in covering all expenses; some might have a certain limit for your entire time at the program.
-Moving expenses: Most universities don't give you additional money to move.
-Furniture: Unless you move into a furnished unit, you'll need to buy some furniture if you don't have it.
-Going out: Sometimes, your cohort will want to hang out. Sometimes, you'll hangout at restaurants and you'll want to ensure that you have money to do so. Sometimes, you won't feel like cooking. If it's a sit-down restaurant, a tip is courtesy and is common 

Other expenses may include: pet expenses, lyft/taxi rides,  hospital bills, dental appointments, major appliance purchases (such as a washer or dryer), and so on. 

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I think you really have to be aware of budgeting to save during grad school. The worst part is getting paid only once a month and having to factor in how much you'll need before the next month.

As Warelin said, there are too many expenses that are too variable to judge for any individual.

I actually got paid similarly before starting grad school, so I'll give you my experience there. I lived in LA, my rent was $800 a month for a shared room. I'd say I was able to save anywhere from $100-$300 a month, depending on the month. But I could end up pretty broke before my next paycheck, and I got paid every 2 weeks there. 

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I understand the various factors which will affect the end amount. I wanted to look at examples of how people are managing with their expenses on a stipend.

It's a bit better here in the Netherlands though. Rent includes everything (electricity, internet, heating) and driving is not that preferred anyway (bicycle tracks everywhere). Conferences are paid for by the university.

Looks like continuing with a PhD here would be much easier for me!

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