Jump to content
  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt

What are the benefits with co-supervision


gradschoolprobs
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm interested in going for a PhD and had contacted an associate prof at another school if we could meet to talk and he agreed to supervise when we met without asking for a CV, transcript, etc. Then the second time we met, he emphasized that he will be the primary supervisor and that he spoke with an assistant prof and suggested that I talk to that prof to discuss co-supervision. So, I did as I was told and contacted the assistant prof to request for a meeting. Luckily I heard back....but the prof wants a transcript before we meet. Why would this prof want a transcript? What are the benefits with co-supervision?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well a transcript would indicate what type of coursework you've taken so they have a sense of knowledge you have and still need.  Co-supervision can be great if both professors get along well and the focus is on the students goals and needs.  Co-supervision would likely be miserable if the professors had constant conflict or provided opposing directions.  It might be helpful for you to think about what it is you hope to gain from co-supervision and discuss how those needs might be met with each supervisor.  Is there anyone in your program that has done this or that can act as a neutral party for you to bounce ideas/thoughts/questions off of?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well it would help if they clarify what they mean.  That could mean your GPA is low or it could mean they don't feel you've taken enough (or the right) foundation courses for your field.  Either could lead to them not wanting to co-supervise which isn't the end of the world since that isn't the norm.  At that point you'd go back to the initial supervisor and ask their thoughts on how you should proceed.  You could be a stellar student and still find that this professor doesn't want to co-supervise, its extra work they may not have the time or energy for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, MarineBluePsy said:

Co-supervision would likely be miserable if the professors had constant conflict or provided opposing directions.

1

When considering @MarineBluePsy 's guidance, please keep in mind that relationships can change over time. Professor Xavier and Professor Eisenhardt can be friends today, mortal enemies tomorrow, and looking to graduate students to choose sides.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Sigaba said:

 Professor Xavier and Professor Eisenhardt can be friends today, mortal enemies tomorrow, and looking to graduate students to choose sides.

I can confirm this as it has happened to me and it made everything very uncomfortable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, MarineBluePsy said:

Well it would help if they clarify what they mean.  That could mean your GPA is low or it could mean they don't feel you've taken enough (or the right) foundation courses for your field.  Either could lead to them not wanting to co-supervise which isn't the end of the world since that isn't the norm.  At that point you'd go back to the initial supervisor and ask their thoughts on how you should proceed.  You could be a stellar student and still find that this professor doesn't want to co-supervise, its extra work they may not have the time or energy for.

Thank you! Sorry, I actually haven't heard back from the assistant prof yet about my transcript. I was thinking of the worst case scenario and hope to hear back soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's also the possibility that having co-supervisors will be way more work for you.  Assuming each professor is willing to help you toward your goals, that doesn't mean they won't each have different approaches to doing that.  That may mean you doing more lab work, writing, or coursework to develop the skills each thinks you need.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, MarineBluePsy said:

There's also the possibility that having co-supervisors will be way more work for you.  Assuming each professor is willing to help you toward your goals, that doesn't mean they won't each have different approaches to doing that.  That may mean you doing more lab work, writing, or coursework to develop the skills each thinks you need.

Good points! I worry about that! ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.