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grad school rejection = best thing ever?


EscapedMonkey

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Came across this blog post today - food for thought for those of us applying for grad school. Perhaps getting rejected isn't so bad, getting a tenure track professorship seems nearly impossible these days, especially for women (if that's your end goal).

Cheer up!

Not a very cheerful post <_<

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Me too, my first rejection came last week. Did a bit of thinking over the weekend, stepped back from this crazy process to think about what a PhD actually means for lifestyle/quality of life. It's what I want to do, but I have to be okay with the fact that I might not get in and also need to start thinking about the next step.

After getting my first rejection, this article is actually somewhat comforting.

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I think it's easier when you're not in the humanities - there's another world out there for the "hard" scientists

Even then, I'm wondering if a PhD would just make me overqualified for non-academia jobs. I was just applying for a job today that said "bachelors degree preferred," but wondered if listing my master's already made me overqualified. Maybe I should have left it off.

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I will certainly not pay for my humanities education. It seems as though many students are admitted to programs without funding so as to pay for those who truly have a talent for it. Don't just dismiss this as arrogance, it is true graduate education as well as some undergraduate institutions.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I went 0/6 last year and it actually did help me reevaluate and focus my interests. I think it's easy to get caught up in the feeling that you need to go to graduate school at a specific time for a specific purpose but that's often not the case.

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"In the humanities, where most students pay for their own PhDs, the figure is 49%."

I was not aware that most Ph.D. students in the humanities paid for their own degrees. I certainly will not.

I don't think many humanities students in America pay for their PhDs. That seems like pretty poor research/writing on the part of the Economist, or the situation is different in the UK.

Edited by Ahab
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I don't think many humanities students in America pay for their PhDs. That seems like pretty poor research/writing on the part of the Economist, or the situation is different in the UK.

Agreed. Very poor research. It sounds like someone that's whining.

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Came across this blog post today - food for thought for those of us applying for grad school. Perhaps getting rejected isn't so bad, getting a tenure track professorship seems nearly impossible these days, especially for women (if that's your end goal).

Cheer up!

What is this garbage I keep hearing about women having a hard time?

Look at any psych dept. there is usually a 50/50 split or better for women.

How many racial minorities do you see?

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