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it's now or never for grad school


nini312
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i'm nearing 30 and was given the advice that if i don't get accepted for fall 2009, i shouldn't try for fall 2010, i should just try to find work and start creating a career path.

two problems:

1. no jobs to allow that to happen for me.

2. no experience besides my BA in psychology +admin work +some nonprofit volunteer marketing +some research in organizational behavior= scattered.

i wish i could tell admissions that this is my now or never period. so frustrating.

still haven't heard back from admissions, but expecting a decision this week or next. my future is based on the next two weeks. this is killing me!

how does one cope with rejection from admissions in this scenario? anyone else in a similar boat?

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Although I'm not in a similar boat I can offer my advice, which really counts for nothing but here it goes. If you have or planning to have a family in which you need some income, I'd say it should be time to start thinking of getting a steady job (there are still some out there, just maybe not in your field). However, if that isn't a problem I'd say keep trying! There are plenty of graduate students your age and older, I really don't see the big deal.

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I think now or never is highly over-rated... and if you want to do the grad school thing, you should keep at it for as long as it takes.

But then I'm 48 and just finishing up my MA and about to start my Phd this fall.

Whoever told you it was now or never was wrong... there are lots of people far older than you are in grad school and we have a lot to offer.

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i'm nearing 30 and was given the advice that if i don't get accepted for fall 2009, i shouldn't try for fall 2010, i should just try to find work and start creating a career path.

i wish i could tell admissions that this is my now or never period.

Never??? I don't like that word.

You think you're old? I'm 37. I got accepted into 4 Ph.D. programs this spring.

Chill, dude. 30 is not the end of the world. Work for a year or two if you don't get accepted this year, but don't assume it's the end of your academic career.

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Thanks everyone. Yes, it's true, I'm in a vulnerable phase right now. Admissions process is a very humbling experience, and I've become easily influenced by anyone's "advice" lately! 30 is just a number, but to some traditional people, it's when everything is supposed to be somewhat settled. Damn them all.

I will post my results as I get them in....

Cheers!

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i'm almost 30 as well. this is my 2nd year in a row applying. i'm also waiting on these last two weeks, with 0 acceptances and 6 apps pending. so i'm in a very similar situation as you.

i'm willing to give it another year. but if it doesnt work out next year, my 3rd try, then i'd have to ask myself if i'm truly cut out for academia.

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i'm nearing 30 and was given the advice that if i don't get accepted for fall 2009, i shouldn't try for fall 2010, i should just try to find work and start creating a career path.

Bad advice. Too much of that out there...

I'm 38 and have been accepted by 2 PhD programs so far. Keep reaching for what *you* want to do.

It's *never* too late. I cannot stress that enough. :)

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I think now or never is highly over-rated... and if you want to do the grad school thing, you should keep at it for as long as it takes.

But then I'm 48 and just finishing up my MA and about to start my Phd this fall.

Whoever told you it was now or never was wrong... there are lots of people far older than you are in grad school and we have a lot to offer.

Hear, hear :!:

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Don't fret so much about it. You'll make it happen some way or another.

Longest case scenario, you could always go into a MA program and then transition into a PhD program.

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It's so encouraging to see all these posts by fellow "older" students! I'll be 30 in the Fall, and throughout this process I've been told by most that it will be difficult for me to compete with all the younger applicants. However, as you can tell by my signature, this wasn't this case :-) My only worry now is that I will feel out of place amongst younger classmates, but judging from this thread, I guess the "older" student isn't as rare as I thought!

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I'm really glad to see this post. I don't see any reason to give up hope/feel that academia is not for you. Do you want to go into a straight up PhD program? or, are you applying to MAs? Is funding important? I KNOW there are MA's in counseling/psychology or marriage and family therapy that will accept many qualified applicants.

If you are rejected this time from possibly highly ranked schools, would an MA from a slightly lower ranked graduate and professional school help?? What is your plan/why are you getting the degree??

I'm curious and wanting to help!!

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It's so encouraging to see all these posts by fellow "older" students! I'll be 30 in the Fall, and throughout this process I've been told by most that it will be difficult for me to compete with all the younger applicants. However, as you can tell by my signature, this wasn't this case :-) My only worry now is that I will feel out of place amongst younger classmates, but judging from this thread, I guess the "older" student isn't as rare as I thought!

Older students are the norm in my program, to the point where I feel a little out of place. Over half of the students in my department are over 30, married, and have kids.

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Who told you that you can't begin a grad program at 30? I will be turning 30 in October and I was just accepted to 3 PhD programs this year. This is my second round of admissions. I would say that you absolutely DO NOT have to give up. And like many others have posted here, you don't have to put your life on hold in the process. I also have a son and a a wonderful husband who is very supportive of my ambitions (we've been down the grad school route before so he knows the deal). I have also found that there are a wide range of ages in grad school, with people of all different backgrounds and family situations. I really wasn't expecting that--at 29 I thought I'd be one the oldest entering students, but that was far from the case, as ka pointed out. Keep your chin up!

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I'm also pretty close to 30 and going into a phd program in September. And apart from everyone asking about when the babies will happen, I've had a lot of support for my choice to do this at this point in my life. I honestly don't think admission committees worry too much about age, unless it's extremely far out of the normal range for some reason, and 30 is just not that old.

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I am joining the ranks of the almost 30 crowd, have an M.A., going in for PhD. I am a little worried about being a bit older, but at the same time I feel I am much better prepared, focused, and experienced to pursue this course than I did at 22, fresh out of undergrad.

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