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Weebly: Make your personal website - examples?


RedPill
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http://www.weebly.com/

 

This site is an amazing tool for creating a website. Especially if you're a graduate/undergraduate student. In addition to LinkedIn, websites are a great way to promote yourself. 

 

 

Does anyone have any Weebly site examples for undergraduate students or masters students? I.e. Someone early on in their academic career(preferably people who plan to work in an academic setting, pursue a PhD, faculty or administrative position or utilize a CV)

 

 

I'm looking for examples for my own site. :)

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I agree that websites are a very important part of your academic and professional presence. I think you can still make very nice sites without weebly or wix or other services like this, even without any HTML or CSS knowledge. I'd show you my example but since it's nice to not blatantly reveal one's identity on this forum, I'd rather not post a link to my website (even though anyone who really wanted to can probably track me down based on my signature and posts, I think it's still better not to directly link!)

 

I like hosting the website code on my department's server because then I can have a URL like www.dept.school.edu/~myname instead of www.companyname.com/myname. Also it feels like I have more control! You can do this with weebly or wix too but then you'd have to pay!!

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Guest Gnome Chomsky

Just a few questions/observations about personal websites... So I noticed a lot of my younger professors have websites. They mainly have a homepage and a few links at the top to things like CV, publications, links to other professors, and a blog. A few things I don't entire understand: if you're just gonna link CV and publications, why not just put it on your Linkedin instead of creating an entire website? Also, what's up with the blog? I read a few entries and it's just like, "I have a great young class of Calculus students. I was surprised with how well everyone did on the midterm..." Is the blog for personal reasons (a place to let out your thoughts) or is it considered the norm? I don't see how a blog of that nature would really help you possibly get a job. Who knows.

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Just a few questions/observations about personal websites... So I noticed a lot of my younger professors have websites. They mainly have a homepage and a few links at the top to things like CV, publications, links to other professors, and a blog. A few things I don't entire understand: if you're just gonna link CV and publications, why not just put it on your Linkedin instead of creating an entire website? Also, what's up with the blog? I read a few entries and it's just like, "I have a great young class of Calculus students. I was surprised with how well everyone did on the midterm..." Is the blog for personal reasons (a place to let out your thoughts) or is it considered the norm? I don't see how a blog of that nature would really help you possibly get a job. Who knows.

 

Heh, I'm not sure, since I have a link to my LinkedIn and grad school pages from my personal site, rather than add that content all over again.

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Academia is very culturally driven. It's part of the culture to have a website or a page on your university's website.

 

LinkedIn CVs aren't CVs, they're LinkedIns. CVs are made to follow a very consistent format. It's hard using a LinkedIn as a CV. Maybe if you're an undergrad or masters candidate, you can do it. It's going to get cluttered listing your publications on LinkedIn(primary reason for a CV)

 

I have both, but partially because I need to maintain my non-academia relationships. Academics usually don't utilize LinkedIn from what I can tell. Especially the older ones, though that may be because they don't need it.

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Guest Gnome Chomsky

Academia is very culturally driven. It's part of the culture to have a website or a page on your university's website.

 

LinkedIn CVs aren't CVs, they're LinkedIns. CVs are made to follow a very consistent format. It's hard using a LinkedIn as a CV. Maybe if you're an undergrad or masters candidate, you can do it. It's going to get cluttered listing your publications on LinkedIn(primary reason for a CV)

 

I have both, but partially because I need to maintain my non-academia relationships. Academics usually don't utilize LinkedIn from what I can tell. Especially the older ones, though that may be because they don't need it.

Oh I don't have Linkedin. I assumed you could upload your CV. I guess that makes sense. Linkedins are probably more professional-driven whereas personal websites are more academic-driven. I still don't get the whole blog thing though.
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The big reason to have a website instead of just Linkedin is to help control your web presence. A website indexed is more likely to draw search engine hits, and will help direct people to you when they google your name/your work. 

 

Personally, I like the control to have up more on my service work, class materials, paper prints, a CV, etc. It lets you make an interactive CV if you want, where people can find more about your work than just a CV. 

 

Also, not a bad thing to learn how to code. 

 

I don't want to put mine up, but I found http://reclaimhosting.com/, which is run by a pair of professors, and is aimed at students. It's very cheap domain registration, coupled to a year of free hosting- or more if they can continue to fund it through grants. 

 

Really nice couple of guys, and have been really quick about answering any questions/issues I have (within the hour, usually). 

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Agreed with the personal blogs on personal websites. Although, In my opinion, blogs are an outdated forms of communication. In the days of Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Tumblr, texting, Skype and Facetime, Facebook and email, who bothers creating a blog? I'd prefer to do a vlog(video log) if anything.

 

 

That way they can hire me based on my charm an good looks rather than my CV.

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Blogs are not outdated if you want to spread awareness, insight, or reflection on specific current events, particularly real-world issues related to your academic field.

In addition, the other websites that you mentioned above are easier for hackers to invade and steal your personal information. Nothing wrong with using old technology. 

Edited by michigan girl
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Blogs are not outdated if you want to spread awareness, insight, or reflection on specific current events, particularly real-world issues related to your academic field.

In addition, the other websites that you mentioned above are easier for hackers to invade and steal your personal information. Nothing wrong with using old technology. 

 

It depends if you have relevant followers to your blogs. Also, there's no evidence that the other websites mentioned have a higher likelihood of being hacked than a blog. At least, I haven't seen that evidence, and I follow the Tech industry and news closely. Unless you have lots of high tech enemies and/or keep credit card information on your website/blog, I doubt you have a high likelihood of being hacked anyways. 

 

It also depends on the field. Besides, you can have a blog on a personal website. 

 

One of my favorite blogs: 

http://www.theneuroethicsblog.com/

Edited by RedPill
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Guest Gnome Chomsky

Weebly works something as tumblr so i use it last week. Awesome features like it.

I hope you don't blog like that.

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