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I'm currently deciding between Penn State MAS program and the Cornell MPS program. Both will be a one year program because I did my undergrad at PSU. 
As a current Penn State undergraduate I'm leaning towards the staying here because I'm familiar with the area, the professors, have a job, research hook ups, ect 

However, I know Cornell has very good name recognition. My main goal is to go straight into industry. I looked over the post graduate survey for Cornell and was unimpressed with the average salary (70k) seeing as a few months ago I turned down a 63k a year job hoping to get accepted into graduate school. I'm not aware of any Penn State version of post graduate survey. 

The price tag is about 22k for Penn State and Cornell is 52k in tuition alone. I could probably afford Cornell without too many loans (coming out of undergrad I have no loans) but I feel that the average starting salary should be higher to justify the double price tag. 

I'm wondering if anyone has any insight into which program could be better for me. I'm an American and I know most of Cornell MPS students are chinese internationals so I'm wondering if that's bring the average salary down significantly and that for a domestic student, the salary prospects are much better. 

Thanks in advance for any help. 

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I'm applying for a Master's in the fall of this year as well (I got accepted to Cornell MPS this week too), so I can share some of the information I've gathered from various departments. 

Unfortunately, most of the programs I contacted don't track the salaries (or even job placement) of their Master's graduates.  Some gave me more anecdotal information on that topic rather than hard numbers.  Colorado State University's one year MAS stated that their average starting salary last year was 77k (2/3rd of students are online at various part time levels, so how their current salaries were taken into account with this, I'm not for certain), and that job placement was 100% (they are the only program besides Cornell I found that actually sends out a survey to graduates).  UIUC anecdotally stated that graduates make around 70k and typically have multiple job offers at graduation.  Florida State stated MS students make around 60k starting (appropriate methinks considering the lower cost of living of the surrounding states and cities like Atlanta) and domestic students have multiple job offers at graduation, but this was anecdotal as far as I know.  Those were the only schools that could provide me with any information regarding their Master's graduates job placement or salaries (consequently, those are the only programs I'm considering attending.  At least show me you care what happens to people who go through your programs!).

If you're currently in the field and making around 63k or higher, I'd consider whether it was worth it to quit my job to attend school full time vs. keeping my job and attending part time.  Personal preference plays a big role too.  However, I'll admit that it's hard for me to imagine that angle because I'm coming from a very different place - I'm in a different field currently trying to transition to data analysis / statistics, and I've never been able to break 47k yearly salary, with most of my job offers being in the 30s and low 40s.  So 60k-70k average starting salary is life changing for me.

Good luck with your decision making progress!

Edited by Volo88
Correct FSU comment
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No, I'm currently a senior undergraduate and so in the fall I applied to jobs because Grad school doesn't make decisions til march and I got offered a position for 63k which I declined because I figured I could make significantly more with a masters in statistics. 

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