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PolyWonk

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About PolyWonk

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    Espresso Shot

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  • Location
    USA
  • Application Season
    2013 Fall
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    Already Attending

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  1. I know it's been a week or so since this topic, but I figure I'd put my 2 cents in. I differ from the others, because I encourage you to wait. So, my situation is/was almost identical to yours. I went straight from undergrad into a 1 year MA program. I really wanted to apply for PhD programs in that year, but my MA program flat out stated to every student in that they would not support any application for PhD programs until after we had graduated. (One person went ahead and did it with recommendations from his undergrad. He got in, and he's now doing his PhD somewhere in the world.) They a
  2. Ditto... I still can't believe my luck. I'm almost afraid to say it and jinx it!
  3. http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/graduate-school/468440-sais-phd.html I don't know much about it, but I found these two forums helpful in gathering info when I was thinking about applying.
  4. Honestly, this goes to show the fickleness of the admissions process... knowing people like her exist helps me feel a little less bad about all my rejections. I'll just pretend she rejected me from all those schools
  5. This isn't meant to be super negative... I just had an... interesting... experience with one school. I emailed them on the Friday before April 15th to get my decision because I had heard absolutely nothing! That got me thinking, there are some things about this process that are truly annoying. The waiting, the writing, the repetitiveness and monotony of parts of the applications... What irked you the most? Things that bothered me the most: 1. Spending a bunch of $$, then not hearing anything from a school. (UNC, amirite?) 2. Filling in my work history AND submitting my
  6. In economics they always say, look at the opportunity cost. Now I'm no economist, but I don't think there is a high cost if you pursue the MA. You're not going into debt to do it, which is more than most people can say! They want you, and the are willing to pay for the value that they think you will add to their program! That means something! Let's say you can't find a great job after your MA. If, when your finished, you end up in another un-enriching job in another sweet but no-name little town, you won't have really sacrificed anything, and you would have satisfied all the what-ifs that
  7. I can't be of much help, since I myself am foreign to the area. I was actually wondering if you could post a link to the report you're talking about. I would love to have something like that to refer to...
  8. Haven't heard back from UNC since an interview... I've already decided on another school, but I do think it's a little upsetting. Maryland, I heard from on March 7th... that's rude weird that they haven't contacted you. I know that in some cases there can be mixups with applications. Have you had any sort of contact with them?
  9. Best of luck to you at VTech! You can come into policy work & policy research from any discipline, and if it's right, you'll make it back!
  10. Did you walk, bike or drive to campus?
  11. You're very welcome Yeah, I noticed that. But in a world of so much ambiguity, when it comes to rankings I figure that the ranked "quality" of the master's programs reflects (to a [small] degree) the quality of professors, resources and hopefully opportunity that one can find there. I thought about this a lot, because rankings for policy programs are few and far between, and many of them left me more confused about where to apply than before I saw them. What do you guys think?
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