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Prob

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  1. No don’t worry about it—‘tis the season to be gruff! I think that most of the UK students on the MPhil don’t apply for US PhDs. I got a high pass. I was advised to apply to (and I’m paraphrasing here) ‘a few of the lower ranked ones just in case’ by a professor I (continue to) trust and admire deeply. I’ve had two offers, one from an unranked program and one from a 40-50 program. I’ve been waitlisted for a 30-40 program. I’ve been rejected from five 1-40 programs, and still waiting to hear back from two (although I’m not holding my breath). But in my case, all else might not be equal. I g
  2. So I think a high pass may very well be below the grade cut-off for some top 20 schools. The conversion is particularly hard for the MPhil because it’s marked differently to other UK master’s degrees, but I think it’s roughly a 3.7. And yes, I was indulging in a little hyperbole. Of course it’s not going to be sufficient on its own. But I think there was a sense among the grad community when I was there that a high pass would, other things being equal, get you into the mix for top 20 US schools. But, admittedly anecdotal, data seems to suggest otherwise. No one I know who got a high pass
  3. A word of warning to any future PhD applicants from the Cambridge MPhil: a high pass on the MPhil is not sufficient for getting admitted to any of the top 20 US programs to which you apply. Neither is a distinction. Source: Personal experience (and in the case of the distinction, experience of others on the course) more sour and raw than raspberries in March
  4. I can claim posting about being on the waiting list at Syracuse. I think the seeming randomness may at least in part be due to idiosyncratic features of applicants. For example, I’m an international student living in the UK, and in the e-mail I received they invited me to visit the campus. They may have wanted to let me know as early as possible as it will take longer for me to make travel plans than someone from or who lives in the US (e.g if I needed to update my passport). But I’m sure that’s one of many factors (and perhaps only in play in a small number of cases). As for all the radi
  5. I got the same e-mail from UCSB (I'm going to the open event). My application has now been updated as a provisional offer (provisional on sending them official transcripts). See you there if you'e going?
  6. Just an update: I've been accepted to UCSB (which is just about a PGR top 50) but rejected from Wisc. (which doesn't even require the GRE). Still waiting to hear back from the rest.
  7. Thanks very much for letting me know. The thing that concerns me is that a few of the programs that I'm applying for say their average quant score for their PhD students is in the 80th+ percentile. But this information is of limited use for the reason that it doesn't give the range of quant scores. Would you say that if it's fair to think that if they talk about their average GRE scores on their admissions website, then they are more likely than average to care about such scores? Does area of interest intersect with this issue as well? I mainly like metaphysics and metaethics, and want to make
  8. Hello, I’m an applicant from the UK who’s applying to Philosophy PhD programs in the US starting September 2020. I recently took the GRE and got a verbal score of 166 (97th percentile) and a quant score of 156 (60th percentile). There seems to be so much conflicting information about how important GRE scores are and, as an international applicant, it can all be very confusing. Do you think that my mediocre quant score will be a hindrance to getting into any (or certain top) PhD programs in the states? Other relevant background info to do with my application: I have a BA and an MPhil
  9. Hello, I’m an applicant from the UK who’s applying to Philosophy PhD programs in the US starting September 2020. I recently took the GRE and got a verbal score of 166 (97th percentile) and a quant score of 156 (60th percentile). There seems to be so much conflicting information about how important GRE scores are and, as an international applicant, it can all be very confusing. Do you think that my mediocre quant score will be a hindrance to getting into any (or certain top) PhD programs in the states? Other relevant background info to do with my application: I have a BA and an MPhil
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