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canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls

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  1. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from PegDanson in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I'm not a current grad student, but literally everyone (faculty, postdocs, students) has told me that the number one priority should be choosing a school that has at least a few labs you're really interested in. Prestige will not get you a postdoc, your performance in grad school will. My current PI went to a grad school that is ranked lower than #200 but did her post doc at a top ranked ivy. 
    So, it's important that the work you'll be doing is inspiring to you. Grad school is very long. Where do you see yourself happy and successful? 
    The one aspect that prestige may affect is funding, but many schools have ample funding despite being "lower ranked." I wouldn't let USNews decide for you.
  2. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from glia_girl in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    Hi - I've been on two so far. Around 60% of the time, the school will be trying to recruit you by showing presentations about the school, giving faculty talks, hosting socials and conversations with current graduate students.
    You'll like have 5ish actual interviews which are 30-45 minutes long. Honestly, they can really range in format. Some faculty will ask for a 3-5 minute recap of your research, some will ask you to describe one of your projects in depth (usually of your choosing). Sometimes, professors will ask tons of questions, not necessarily as a "gotcha," but mostly just to see how you're thinking about your research. Then your interviewer will likely talk about their research (which they love to do, so show enthusiasm!) and offer to answer any questions you have about the program or anything.
    Mine have really ranged; I've talked for 20 minutes straight at some and at others we only talked about why we love to do research and what I hope to do in grad school. So, be prepared to talk about your research, but don't be surprised if you don't at all! Hopefully, your faculty are very friendly and interviews will feel like a fun conversation about science.
    To be honest, it's kind of difficult to feel out the vibe of the school virtually so I'm really paying attention to subtleties in how the current students talk about their experiences. Hopefully, you're meeting with faculty who have labs you'd be interested in joining, because this is a great time to feel out if you would enjoy their lab. You should choose a grad school that has options for you, so if you find out you're not really vibin with some faculty that were once interested in, take note. 
    Finally, if there's anyone you didn't get to talk to during the actual interview dates, the program will absolutely coordinate a meeting for you. 
    Feel free to reach out to me if you wanna talk about anything more specific, I'm happy to do so.
  3. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from glia_girl in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I would dress in business attire: blazer + blouse/shirt and tie. Interviews are not very formal but it can't hurt to dress professionally.
    How to stand out: show your personality and passion for science! Interviews can range from you talking about your work for 20 minutes straight to very casual conversations about science and doing research. Interviewers want to see that you will complete a PhD. That means showing that you love science, showing you are not blindly following the instructions of a superior, and frankly that you can handle the workload. If you haven't done an independent project, be prepared to justify how you will be able to work on your own/without guidance. You will probably also be asked if you could continue working on your current project for 1 more year, what you would do.
    Also, there will be a portion where the interviewers tell you about their work. Look interested and ask questions. I read a couple papers of each of my interviewers before going in. I don't think it was necessary but did help me.
    Finally, you will be asked pretty often what you want to do in grad school. It doesn't have to be specific, but dream big. It would help to know a couple of techniques you're interested in learning and the subfield you want to explore. Example: "I'm really interested in addiction and drug use and would love to learn some molecular techniques to study opioid receptors as well as do fMRI studies in patients..." etc. It doesn't have to be perfect.
    Overall, schools are also adjusting to online interviews and recognize the challenge. They are also trying to convince you to go to their school, so they are also working very hard to show the culture and value of their program. If you have multiple interviews lined up, you should also be feeling out the school and seeing how well you connect with the program! I also get nervous about online meetings but it's a two way street - everyone is very understanding of that and some difficulties are expected. 
    In short: 
    -practice talking about your research clearly and concisely
    -know who you're interviewing with
    -say a bit about what you dream of doing in grad school
    -relax, you'll do fine if you like science
    -take note of how much you like the school
    Hope that helps, feel free to reach out to me if you have any other questions.
     
  4. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from BabyScientist in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I'm not a current grad student, but literally everyone (faculty, postdocs, students) has told me that the number one priority should be choosing a school that has at least a few labs you're really interested in. Prestige will not get you a postdoc, your performance in grad school will. My current PI went to a grad school that is ranked lower than #200 but did her post doc at a top ranked ivy. 
    So, it's important that the work you'll be doing is inspiring to you. Grad school is very long. Where do you see yourself happy and successful? 
    The one aspect that prestige may affect is funding, but many schools have ample funding despite being "lower ranked." I wouldn't let USNews decide for you.
  5. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from BonBon in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    No problem I should add: a general ranking/prestige may not be reflected on your specific field of interest. For example, let's say you're interested in neurodegeneration.  A "lower ranked" school may have an entire center dedicated to neurodegenerative diseases and have a strong connection with a great nearby hospital, while a higher ranked school may put less emphasis on that topic of interest. Something to consider.
  6. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from allions in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    No problem I should add: a general ranking/prestige may not be reflected on your specific field of interest. For example, let's say you're interested in neurodegeneration.  A "lower ranked" school may have an entire center dedicated to neurodegenerative diseases and have a strong connection with a great nearby hospital, while a higher ranked school may put less emphasis on that topic of interest. Something to consider.
  7. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from allions in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I'm not a current grad student, but literally everyone (faculty, postdocs, students) has told me that the number one priority should be choosing a school that has at least a few labs you're really interested in. Prestige will not get you a postdoc, your performance in grad school will. My current PI went to a grad school that is ranked lower than #200 but did her post doc at a top ranked ivy. 
    So, it's important that the work you'll be doing is inspiring to you. Grad school is very long. Where do you see yourself happy and successful? 
    The one aspect that prestige may affect is funding, but many schools have ample funding despite being "lower ranked." I wouldn't let USNews decide for you.
  8. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from loci_thepoki in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    No problem I should add: a general ranking/prestige may not be reflected on your specific field of interest. For example, let's say you're interested in neurodegeneration.  A "lower ranked" school may have an entire center dedicated to neurodegenerative diseases and have a strong connection with a great nearby hospital, while a higher ranked school may put less emphasis on that topic of interest. Something to consider.
  9. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from loci_thepoki in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I'm not a current grad student, but literally everyone (faculty, postdocs, students) has told me that the number one priority should be choosing a school that has at least a few labs you're really interested in. Prestige will not get you a postdoc, your performance in grad school will. My current PI went to a grad school that is ranked lower than #200 but did her post doc at a top ranked ivy. 
    So, it's important that the work you'll be doing is inspiring to you. Grad school is very long. Where do you see yourself happy and successful? 
    The one aspect that prestige may affect is funding, but many schools have ample funding despite being "lower ranked." I wouldn't let USNews decide for you.
  10. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from lowestprime in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I'm not a current grad student, but literally everyone (faculty, postdocs, students) has told me that the number one priority should be choosing a school that has at least a few labs you're really interested in. Prestige will not get you a postdoc, your performance in grad school will. My current PI went to a grad school that is ranked lower than #200 but did her post doc at a top ranked ivy. 
    So, it's important that the work you'll be doing is inspiring to you. Grad school is very long. Where do you see yourself happy and successful? 
    The one aspect that prestige may affect is funding, but many schools have ample funding despite being "lower ranked." I wouldn't let USNews decide for you.
  11. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from lowestprime in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I also have a UCLA admissions update (27 Jan):
     
    "Thank you for your email and for your application to the NSIDP! At this time, I cannot provide any updates however, I would encourage you to review the timeline for our admissions process on the Admissions FAQ page: http://www.neuroscience.ucla.edu/admissions-faq
    If there is an update to the status of your application, we will contact you directly."
     
    I'm gonna assume this means they did sent out all their invites, given that they're sticking to the timeline. I'm surprised, to be truthful. I would've expected more people to report on it on these forums. 
  12. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from Neuro-tic in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I've talked to a few faculty about this in advance, and frankly it can only be seen as a negative if you use a PowerPoint. A big part of interviews is seeing how you do communicating your research in a little more casual, less scripted setting. Your PowerPoint could be seen as a crutch. Faculty want to talk with you not listen to you present.
    I know others have done it, even in person, and it's worked out for them. But, I wouldn't count on using it. 
    in short, no lol
  13. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from lowestprime in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I've talked to a few faculty about this in advance, and frankly it can only be seen as a negative if you use a PowerPoint. A big part of interviews is seeing how you do communicating your research in a little more casual, less scripted setting. Your PowerPoint could be seen as a crutch. Faculty want to talk with you not listen to you present.
    I know others have done it, even in person, and it's worked out for them. But, I wouldn't count on using it. 
    in short, no lol
  14. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from comp_neuro in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    Hi - I've been on two so far. Around 60% of the time, the school will be trying to recruit you by showing presentations about the school, giving faculty talks, hosting socials and conversations with current graduate students.
    You'll like have 5ish actual interviews which are 30-45 minutes long. Honestly, they can really range in format. Some faculty will ask for a 3-5 minute recap of your research, some will ask you to describe one of your projects in depth (usually of your choosing). Sometimes, professors will ask tons of questions, not necessarily as a "gotcha," but mostly just to see how you're thinking about your research. Then your interviewer will likely talk about their research (which they love to do, so show enthusiasm!) and offer to answer any questions you have about the program or anything.
    Mine have really ranged; I've talked for 20 minutes straight at some and at others we only talked about why we love to do research and what I hope to do in grad school. So, be prepared to talk about your research, but don't be surprised if you don't at all! Hopefully, your faculty are very friendly and interviews will feel like a fun conversation about science.
    To be honest, it's kind of difficult to feel out the vibe of the school virtually so I'm really paying attention to subtleties in how the current students talk about their experiences. Hopefully, you're meeting with faculty who have labs you'd be interested in joining, because this is a great time to feel out if you would enjoy their lab. You should choose a grad school that has options for you, so if you find out you're not really vibin with some faculty that were once interested in, take note. 
    Finally, if there's anyone you didn't get to talk to during the actual interview dates, the program will absolutely coordinate a meeting for you. 
    Feel free to reach out to me if you wanna talk about anything more specific, I'm happy to do so.
  15. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from 4sdch in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    Hi - I've been on two so far. Around 60% of the time, the school will be trying to recruit you by showing presentations about the school, giving faculty talks, hosting socials and conversations with current graduate students.
    You'll like have 5ish actual interviews which are 30-45 minutes long. Honestly, they can really range in format. Some faculty will ask for a 3-5 minute recap of your research, some will ask you to describe one of your projects in depth (usually of your choosing). Sometimes, professors will ask tons of questions, not necessarily as a "gotcha," but mostly just to see how you're thinking about your research. Then your interviewer will likely talk about their research (which they love to do, so show enthusiasm!) and offer to answer any questions you have about the program or anything.
    Mine have really ranged; I've talked for 20 minutes straight at some and at others we only talked about why we love to do research and what I hope to do in grad school. So, be prepared to talk about your research, but don't be surprised if you don't at all! Hopefully, your faculty are very friendly and interviews will feel like a fun conversation about science.
    To be honest, it's kind of difficult to feel out the vibe of the school virtually so I'm really paying attention to subtleties in how the current students talk about their experiences. Hopefully, you're meeting with faculty who have labs you'd be interested in joining, because this is a great time to feel out if you would enjoy their lab. You should choose a grad school that has options for you, so if you find out you're not really vibin with some faculty that were once interested in, take note. 
    Finally, if there's anyone you didn't get to talk to during the actual interview dates, the program will absolutely coordinate a meeting for you. 
    Feel free to reach out to me if you wanna talk about anything more specific, I'm happy to do so.
  16. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from NeuroPhDInd in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    Hi - I've been on two so far. Around 60% of the time, the school will be trying to recruit you by showing presentations about the school, giving faculty talks, hosting socials and conversations with current graduate students.
    You'll like have 5ish actual interviews which are 30-45 minutes long. Honestly, they can really range in format. Some faculty will ask for a 3-5 minute recap of your research, some will ask you to describe one of your projects in depth (usually of your choosing). Sometimes, professors will ask tons of questions, not necessarily as a "gotcha," but mostly just to see how you're thinking about your research. Then your interviewer will likely talk about their research (which they love to do, so show enthusiasm!) and offer to answer any questions you have about the program or anything.
    Mine have really ranged; I've talked for 20 minutes straight at some and at others we only talked about why we love to do research and what I hope to do in grad school. So, be prepared to talk about your research, but don't be surprised if you don't at all! Hopefully, your faculty are very friendly and interviews will feel like a fun conversation about science.
    To be honest, it's kind of difficult to feel out the vibe of the school virtually so I'm really paying attention to subtleties in how the current students talk about their experiences. Hopefully, you're meeting with faculty who have labs you'd be interested in joining, because this is a great time to feel out if you would enjoy their lab. You should choose a grad school that has options for you, so if you find out you're not really vibin with some faculty that were once interested in, take note. 
    Finally, if there's anyone you didn't get to talk to during the actual interview dates, the program will absolutely coordinate a meeting for you. 
    Feel free to reach out to me if you wanna talk about anything more specific, I'm happy to do so.
  17. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from lowestprime in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    there were just so few posts about interviews... Like I saw 3 on the results page and 1 was way earlier than the other two. It's possible that UCLA is taking far fewer students this year but it just all seems odd. I'm staying open minded.
  18. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from j118 in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    Hi - I've been on two so far. Around 60% of the time, the school will be trying to recruit you by showing presentations about the school, giving faculty talks, hosting socials and conversations with current graduate students.
    You'll like have 5ish actual interviews which are 30-45 minutes long. Honestly, they can really range in format. Some faculty will ask for a 3-5 minute recap of your research, some will ask you to describe one of your projects in depth (usually of your choosing). Sometimes, professors will ask tons of questions, not necessarily as a "gotcha," but mostly just to see how you're thinking about your research. Then your interviewer will likely talk about their research (which they love to do, so show enthusiasm!) and offer to answer any questions you have about the program or anything.
    Mine have really ranged; I've talked for 20 minutes straight at some and at others we only talked about why we love to do research and what I hope to do in grad school. So, be prepared to talk about your research, but don't be surprised if you don't at all! Hopefully, your faculty are very friendly and interviews will feel like a fun conversation about science.
    To be honest, it's kind of difficult to feel out the vibe of the school virtually so I'm really paying attention to subtleties in how the current students talk about their experiences. Hopefully, you're meeting with faculty who have labs you'd be interested in joining, because this is a great time to feel out if you would enjoy their lab. You should choose a grad school that has options for you, so if you find out you're not really vibin with some faculty that were once interested in, take note. 
    Finally, if there's anyone you didn't get to talk to during the actual interview dates, the program will absolutely coordinate a meeting for you. 
    Feel free to reach out to me if you wanna talk about anything more specific, I'm happy to do so.
  19. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from pedrxre in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    Hi - I've been on two so far. Around 60% of the time, the school will be trying to recruit you by showing presentations about the school, giving faculty talks, hosting socials and conversations with current graduate students.
    You'll like have 5ish actual interviews which are 30-45 minutes long. Honestly, they can really range in format. Some faculty will ask for a 3-5 minute recap of your research, some will ask you to describe one of your projects in depth (usually of your choosing). Sometimes, professors will ask tons of questions, not necessarily as a "gotcha," but mostly just to see how you're thinking about your research. Then your interviewer will likely talk about their research (which they love to do, so show enthusiasm!) and offer to answer any questions you have about the program or anything.
    Mine have really ranged; I've talked for 20 minutes straight at some and at others we only talked about why we love to do research and what I hope to do in grad school. So, be prepared to talk about your research, but don't be surprised if you don't at all! Hopefully, your faculty are very friendly and interviews will feel like a fun conversation about science.
    To be honest, it's kind of difficult to feel out the vibe of the school virtually so I'm really paying attention to subtleties in how the current students talk about their experiences. Hopefully, you're meeting with faculty who have labs you'd be interested in joining, because this is a great time to feel out if you would enjoy their lab. You should choose a grad school that has options for you, so if you find out you're not really vibin with some faculty that were once interested in, take note. 
    Finally, if there's anyone you didn't get to talk to during the actual interview dates, the program will absolutely coordinate a meeting for you. 
    Feel free to reach out to me if you wanna talk about anything more specific, I'm happy to do so.
  20. Like
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from sippinmytea in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    Hi - I've been on two so far. Around 60% of the time, the school will be trying to recruit you by showing presentations about the school, giving faculty talks, hosting socials and conversations with current graduate students.
    You'll like have 5ish actual interviews which are 30-45 minutes long. Honestly, they can really range in format. Some faculty will ask for a 3-5 minute recap of your research, some will ask you to describe one of your projects in depth (usually of your choosing). Sometimes, professors will ask tons of questions, not necessarily as a "gotcha," but mostly just to see how you're thinking about your research. Then your interviewer will likely talk about their research (which they love to do, so show enthusiasm!) and offer to answer any questions you have about the program or anything.
    Mine have really ranged; I've talked for 20 minutes straight at some and at others we only talked about why we love to do research and what I hope to do in grad school. So, be prepared to talk about your research, but don't be surprised if you don't at all! Hopefully, your faculty are very friendly and interviews will feel like a fun conversation about science.
    To be honest, it's kind of difficult to feel out the vibe of the school virtually so I'm really paying attention to subtleties in how the current students talk about their experiences. Hopefully, you're meeting with faculty who have labs you'd be interested in joining, because this is a great time to feel out if you would enjoy their lab. You should choose a grad school that has options for you, so if you find out you're not really vibin with some faculty that were once interested in, take note. 
    Finally, if there's anyone you didn't get to talk to during the actual interview dates, the program will absolutely coordinate a meeting for you. 
    Feel free to reach out to me if you wanna talk about anything more specific, I'm happy to do so.
  21. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from NeuroVibe in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    Hi - I've been on two so far. Around 60% of the time, the school will be trying to recruit you by showing presentations about the school, giving faculty talks, hosting socials and conversations with current graduate students.
    You'll like have 5ish actual interviews which are 30-45 minutes long. Honestly, they can really range in format. Some faculty will ask for a 3-5 minute recap of your research, some will ask you to describe one of your projects in depth (usually of your choosing). Sometimes, professors will ask tons of questions, not necessarily as a "gotcha," but mostly just to see how you're thinking about your research. Then your interviewer will likely talk about their research (which they love to do, so show enthusiasm!) and offer to answer any questions you have about the program or anything.
    Mine have really ranged; I've talked for 20 minutes straight at some and at others we only talked about why we love to do research and what I hope to do in grad school. So, be prepared to talk about your research, but don't be surprised if you don't at all! Hopefully, your faculty are very friendly and interviews will feel like a fun conversation about science.
    To be honest, it's kind of difficult to feel out the vibe of the school virtually so I'm really paying attention to subtleties in how the current students talk about their experiences. Hopefully, you're meeting with faculty who have labs you'd be interested in joining, because this is a great time to feel out if you would enjoy their lab. You should choose a grad school that has options for you, so if you find out you're not really vibin with some faculty that were once interested in, take note. 
    Finally, if there's anyone you didn't get to talk to during the actual interview dates, the program will absolutely coordinate a meeting for you. 
    Feel free to reach out to me if you wanna talk about anything more specific, I'm happy to do so.
  22. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from Just_Alice in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I agree with this. At no point besides the CV would anything not related to science (extracurriculars, non science jobs, volunteering) come up. About 90% of your application and basically 100% of your interview will be specifically talking about performing research. 
  23. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from foreverontheQ in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I agree with this. At no point besides the CV would anything not related to science (extracurriculars, non science jobs, volunteering) come up. About 90% of your application and basically 100% of your interview will be specifically talking about performing research. 
  24. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from calizab in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I agree with this. At no point besides the CV would anything not related to science (extracurriculars, non science jobs, volunteering) come up. About 90% of your application and basically 100% of your interview will be specifically talking about performing research. 
  25. Upvote
    canigetuhhhhhhhanswerpls got a reaction from NeuroKween in 2021 Neuroscience PhD Applicants and Admissions Results   
    I agree with this. At no point besides the CV would anything not related to science (extracurriculars, non science jobs, volunteering) come up. About 90% of your application and basically 100% of your interview will be specifically talking about performing research. 
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