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Didn't see a thread so I thought I'd start one for us applying to Acting MFAs this winter! Second time around, planning on arriving better prepared and with more *me* in the audition room. Where is ev

This was so helpful – thanks so much for sharing the info. I think you're completely right about needing to know 100% that it's what I'm interested in pursuing before I apply. At the moment I'm weighi

What up. I'm also doing my MA in English, but I auditioned for MFA programs a year before getting into my current program.  The amount of experience really depends on the university. I found it h

Hi!! This is my first time applying, I am a registered nurse and I live in NYC and I am applying to Juilliard, NYU, Brown, and Yale....so far. Still trying to decide if I want to apply to Columbia. And YES to the more "me" aspect! I reached out to another RN who started at Juilliard this year and that was his biggest advice to me! Where are you based?

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Hi all, I'm dropping in from the English forum hoping someone here can humor me. I'm wondering if anyone might be able to shed light on what kind of experience is expected of applicants to MFA programs in Acting (i.e. when program websites say things like "we expect to see a demonstrated commitment to being an actor" on your resume). Do applicants normally have BFA Acting degrees? How many years of acting experience is expected and in what settings? Should applicants have taken many acting classes before, and are some kinds better than others?

Another question I have: acting (especially for film) can be unlike other fields in that your age and the way you look matter very much in the hiring process (even if at degree level they do not). Is there a "normal" age to apply to MFA programs in acting? Is there ever anyone in MFA Acting programs not in their early 20s?

These are just curiosities from someone who has done minimal serious acting but has been too afraid for many years to pursue it seriously because I sort of missed the boat. Didn't realize it was something I was very interested in until the end of undergrad, whereas if I had gotten into it as a teenager I would have been equipped to pursue it whole-heartedly. Do feel free to rip me apart if it's insane for someone who hasn't worked extensively in the industry and doesn't have ~connections~ to even consider this – but right now, I'm just interested in hearing about how all of this works.

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Hi all. I am reapplying this year. I took the 2018 cycle off. I only auditioned for one school in 2017 to get my feet wet. I am ready to really jump in this year and bring more "me" to the process like you've all mentioned. I'm glad I only auditioned for one school the first year to just see what it was like. That school was CPH/CWRU... a great school but absolutely not the right fit for me.

I finally chose my pieces. I have a question for you: how important do you feel it is to contrast in genre? Like, I have a dramatic Shakespearean, and a comedic contemp. But my backup Shakespearean is also a dramatic piece. My backup contemp is dramatic. I was super concerned with the ability to have them contrast but everyone I've spoken to (MFA grads from Yale and Rutgers) about that says if you can't find one you jive with, it's not worth learning one you won't do well and no school SPECIFICALLY asks for genre contrasting. They just ask for contrasting in general, contemp/Shakespearean verse). 

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On 11/20/2018 at 7:02 AM, Indecisive Poet said:

Hi all, I'm dropping in from the English forum hoping someone here can humor me. I'm wondering if anyone might be able to shed light on what kind of experience is expected of applicants to MFA programs in Acting (i.e. when program websites say things like "we expect to see a demonstrated commitment to being an actor" on your resume). Do applicants normally have BFA Acting degrees? How many years of acting experience is expected and in what settings? Should applicants have taken many acting classes before, and are some kinds better than others?

 Another question I have: acting (especially for film) can be unlike other fields in that your age and the way you look matter very much in the hiring process (even if at degree level they do not). Is there a "normal" age to apply to MFA programs in acting? Is there ever anyone in MFA Acting programs not in their early 20s?

These are just curiosities from someone who has done minimal serious acting but has been too afraid for many years to pursue it seriously because I sort of missed the boat. Didn't realize it was something I was very interested in until the end of undergrad, whereas if I had gotten into it as a teenager I would have been equipped to pursue it whole-heartedly. Do feel free to rip me apart if it's insane for someone who hasn't worked extensively in the industry and doesn't have ~connections~ to even consider this – but right now, I'm just interested in hearing about how all of this works.

Hi, I responded to you in another thread but I will respond here too. :) In my experience, and in the experience of the MFA grads I know, it varies. I know someone who went to Brooklyn for an MFA in Acting in his 40s and I know when I auditioned for CPH/CWRU, all of the grads they accepted were late twenties. But I also know/have friends that got into MFAs right after undergrad at 21/22. In general, I'd say anywhere in your 20s is a good time to go based on the people I've spoken to/met.

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On 11/20/2018 at 7:02 AM, Indecisive Poet said:

Hi all, I'm dropping in from the English forum hoping someone here can humor me. I'm wondering if anyone might be able to shed light on what kind of experience is expected of applicants to MFA programs in Acting (i.e. when program websites say things like "we expect to see a demonstrated commitment to being an actor" on your resume). Do applicants normally have BFA Acting degrees? How many years of acting experience is expected and in what settings? Should applicants have taken many acting classes before, and are some kinds better than others?

Another question I have: acting (especially for film) can be unlike other fields in that your age and the way you look matter very much in the hiring process (even if at degree level they do not). Is there a "normal" age to apply to MFA programs in acting? Is there ever anyone in MFA Acting programs not in their early 20s?

These are just curiosities from someone who has done minimal serious acting but has been too afraid for many years to pursue it seriously because I sort of missed the boat. Didn't realize it was something I was very interested in until the end of undergrad, whereas if I had gotten into it as a teenager I would have been equipped to pursue it whole-heartedly. Do feel free to rip me apart if it's insane for someone who hasn't worked extensively in the industry and doesn't have ~connections~ to even consider this – but right now, I'm just interested in hearing about how all of this works.

I think there is a mixed bag in both regards. My coach does a panel every year with recent grads from the top 10 schools, not all of them had BFAs and according to them accepted students from their programs ranged from like 21-34 years old. I think the audition itself is the most important aspect, not necessarily previous classes or experience, they want to see where you are and if you will be an asset to them and they will be an asset to you. I think it can't hurt to take class or work with a coach of you are planning on auditioning to help with your pieces, especially if you haven't taken any type of class before. I think knowing 100% that this is what you want to do is also important to these programs and you shouldn't apply unless you know that for sure. They are definitely rigorous (In the US some programs are 4 years for the MFA and they require 6 days a week commitment).

Hope that was somewhat helpful. This is my first year applying, I am 27, I have a B.A. in International Studies and a B.S. in nursing. I have been acting for like 8 years but more seriously the past 3 years, most of my experience is on film and I have trained in Meisner Technique and Method Acting (at The Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute in NYC). I am doing private audition coaching and voice coaching to prepare for auditions in January =D 

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On 11/21/2018 at 6:36 PM, HopingForMFA said:

Hi all. I am reapplying this year. I took the 2018 cycle off. I only auditioned for one school in 2017 to get my feet wet. I am ready to really jump in this year and bring more "me" to the process like you've all mentioned. I'm glad I only auditioned for one school the first year to just see what it was like. That school was CPH/CWRU... a great school but absolutely not the right fit for me.

I finally chose my pieces. I have a question for you: how important do you feel it is to contrast in genre? Like, I have a dramatic Shakespearean, and a comedic contemp. But my backup Shakespearean is also a dramatic piece. My backup contemp is dramatic. I was super concerned with the ability to have them contrast but everyone I've spoken to (MFA grads from Yale and Rutgers) about that says if you can't find one you jive with, it's not worth learning one you won't do well and no school SPECIFICALLY asks for genre contrasting. They just ask for contrasting in general, contemp/Shakespearean verse). 

You should bring a different aspect of you in all of your pieces and you have to looooove and be excited about your monologues (definitely the most important in my book). If you can, you should try to find a comedic Shakespeare that you love... there are soooo many great options!! According to my coach (who is legit the best, if you are in NYC I would be happy to give you his info)  you should give the auditors options (he told me to prepare  at least 6 monologues, I have 4 so far) and they should all contrast. I have the opposite problem of you, I could find soooo many comedic monologues I jived with and had trouble finding a dramatic Shakespeare. I finally found one just last week after reading pretty much every Shakespeare monologue. Keep searching, we still have time =D  And if you don't find something, stick with the 4 you love already... 

Where are you applying this year? And why do you feel CPH/CWRU wasn't for you? (It wasn't on my original list but one of the 2018 grads was at a MFA panel I went to last week and I'm considering applying)

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19 hours ago, TheClaraBell said:

You should bring a different aspect of you in all of your pieces and you have to looooove and be excited about your monologues (definitely the most important in my book). If you can, you should try to find a comedic Shakespeare that you love... there are soooo many great options!! According to my coach (who is legit the best, if you are in NYC I would be happy to give you his info)  you should give the auditors options (he told me to prepare  at least 6 monologues, I have 4 so far) and they should all contrast. I have the opposite problem of you, I could find soooo many comedic monologues I jived with and had trouble finding a dramatic Shakespeare. I finally found one just last week after reading pretty much every Shakespeare monologue. Keep searching, we still have time =D  And if you don't find something, stick with the 4 you love already... 

Where are you applying this year? And why do you feel CPH/CWRU wasn't for you? (It wasn't on my original list but one of the 2018 grads was at a MFA panel I went to last week and I'm considering applying)

Hi! I should clarify: it's not that I don't have Shakespearean comedic monologues I love, it's that I can't find any in verse that I love, all the pieces I super gravitate toward are in prose. While I think it's totally okay to present a prose monologue as a backup, I don't see the point, you know? The main point of doing Shakespeare is to show them you have the ability to do verse IMO. I played Nick Bottom this year (mammoth of a role, especially when the director didn't cut anything from Bottom), so I have stuff I could present in verse (like Pyramus in the play within a play), but eh.

Applying to Brown, Yale, Rutgers, and maybe another school. CPH is like a really small program and I am not necessarily convinced they're progressive enough for me. I only say this because I am physically disabled. So I would definitely appreciate a more forward-thinking, we want to assist in creating a more equitable American theatre/entertainment industry, sort of program. I know Brown has already graduated a disabled student and has graduated gender non-conforming students and Yale/Yale Rep has an inclusion and equity taskforce and mission now; and while it absolutely shouldn't matter, because talent is talent and talent should speak for itself, being in the position I'm in, it does give me an extra layer to consider about "fit," so...

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On 11/23/2018 at 3:48 AM, TheClaraBell said:

I think there is a mixed bag in both regards. My coach does a panel every year with recent grads from the top 10 schools, not all of them had BFAs and according to them accepted students from their programs ranged from like 21-34 years old. I think the audition itself is the most important aspect, not necessarily previous classes or experience, they want to see where you are and if you will be an asset to them and they will be an asset to you. I think it can't hurt to take class or work with a coach of you are planning on auditioning to help with your pieces, especially if you haven't taken any type of class before. I think knowing 100% that this is what you want to do is also important to these programs and you shouldn't apply unless you know that for sure. They are definitely rigorous (In the US some programs are 4 years for the MFA and they require 6 days a week commitment).

Hope that was somewhat helpful. This is my first year applying, I am 27, I have a B.A. in International Studies and a B.S. in nursing. I have been acting for like 8 years but more seriously the past 3 years, most of my experience is on film and I have trained in Meisner Technique and Method Acting (at The Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute in NYC). I am doing private audition coaching and voice coaching to prepare for auditions in January =D 

This was so helpful – thanks so much for sharing the info. I think you're completely right about needing to know 100% that it's what I'm interested in pursuing before I apply. At the moment I'm weighing a few different options and I think this next year (while I finish my MA in English) and the gap year after that will be super helpful in mulling things over and getting some more acting experience.

Best of luck with your applications! Let us know if the audition coaching is worth it. Sounds...expensive ?

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2 hours ago, Indecisive Poet said:

This was so helpful – thanks so much for sharing the info. I think you're completely right about needing to know 100% that it's what I'm interested in pursuing before I apply. At the moment I'm weighing a few different options and I think this next year (while I finish my MA in English) and the gap year after that will be super helpful in mulling things over and getting some more acting experience.

Best of luck with your applications! Let us know if the audition coaching is worth it. Sounds...expensive ?

IMO, an audition coach is always worth it and often expensive. 

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On 11/23/2018 at 7:08 PM, HopingForMFA said:

Hi! I should clarify: it's not that I don't have Shakespearean comedic monologues I love, it's that I can't find any in verse that I love, all the pieces I super gravitate toward are in prose. While I think it's totally okay to present a prose monologue as a backup, I don't see the point, you know? The main point of doing Shakespeare is to show them you have the ability to do verse IMO. I played Nick Bottom this year (mammoth of a role, especially when the director didn't cut anything from Bottom), so I have stuff I could present in verse (like Pyramus in the play within a play), but eh.

Applying to Brown, Yale, Rutgers, and maybe another school. CPH is like a really small program and I am not necessarily convinced they're progressive enough for me. I only say this because I am physically disabled. So I would definitely appreciate a more forward-thinking, we want to assist in creating a more equitable American theatre/entertainment industry, sort of program. I know Brown has already graduated a disabled student and has graduated gender non-conforming students and Yale/Yale Rep has an inclusion and equity taskforce and mission now; and while it absolutely shouldn't matter, because talent is talent and talent should speak for itself, being in the position I'm in, it does give me an extra layer to consider about "fit," so...

Ahhh I see. You might consider Juilliard, Columbia and NYU too in that case, they are all getting more and more progressive and are all three participating in a program called Home Base (that started at Juilliard a couple of years ago) that aims to make the programs more inclusive for diverse actors. The student who founded the program was at the grad panel I went to a few weeks ago and I had no idea about it before then. I am the least diverse person and have no disability but it was definitely a huge plus for those programs because they are doing things that make the playing field more equal (although they still has a long way to go). 

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On 11/24/2018 at 2:54 PM, Indecisive Poet said:

This was so helpful – thanks so much for sharing the info. I think you're completely right about needing to know 100% that it's what I'm interested in pursuing before I apply. At the moment I'm weighing a few different options and I think this next year (while I finish my MA in English) and the gap year after that will be super helpful in mulling things over and getting some more acting experience.

Best of luck with your applications! Let us know if the audition coaching is worth it. Sounds...expensive ?

Absolutely! The coaching is sooooo worth it, I can already tell. My monologues are amazing and I still have 2 moths to work on them =D Yes, it is kind of ridiculously expensive, but I am all in. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/20/2018 at 4:02 AM, Indecisive Poet said:

Hi all, I'm dropping in from the English forum hoping someone here can humor me. I'm wondering if anyone might be able to shed light on what kind of experience is expected of applicants to MFA programs in Acting (i.e. when program websites say things like "we expect to see a demonstrated commitment to being an actor" on your resume). Do applicants normally have BFA Acting degrees? How many years of acting experience is expected and in what settings? Should applicants have taken many acting classes before, and are some kinds better than others?

Another question I have: acting (especially for film) can be unlike other fields in that your age and the way you look matter very much in the hiring process (even if at degree level they do not). Is there a "normal" age to apply to MFA programs in acting? Is there ever anyone in MFA Acting programs not in their early 20s?

These are just curiosities from someone who has done minimal serious acting but has been too afraid for many years to pursue it seriously because I sort of missed the boat. Didn't realize it was something I was very interested in until the end of undergrad, whereas if I had gotten into it as a teenager I would have been equipped to pursue it whole-heartedly. Do feel free to rip me apart if it's insane for someone who hasn't worked extensively in the industry and doesn't have ~connections~ to even consider this – but right now, I'm just interested in hearing about how all of this works.

What up. I'm also doing my MA in English, but I auditioned for MFA programs a year before getting into my current program. 

The amount of experience really depends on the university. I found it helpful to look at current grad students to see if they have a website/ resume up, and go from there. From people that I knew and met through this weird process, experience varies widely from fresh out of undergrad to actors who are equity. 

Applicants can have BFAs. They can also have business degrees. MFAs aren't strict in the way that our English programs might be; I had to take prerequisites to become an unconditional student where you don't often see that in MFA programs if they didn't major in theater in undergrad. 

Age depends on the program as well. I know that NIU had a class that ranged from age 24 to some people in their 40s when I auditioned there in 2016. My UG was not that way at all; most were in their 20s or early 30s if they were in the acting program.

Biggest piece of advice I can give comes from my theater professors from my UG in that you can relatively craft your own graduate program, sans terminal degree, right now. One of the biggest draws of an MFA is that you can teach at a college level; something we can already do with an MA*. You already have the means to find classes that give you similar training to that of a grad program, but you can sort of curate it how you'd like. I really wanted to go to a grad program which had a nice sequence in clowning and mask work. I didn't get in, but I was able to find classes in clowning and mime that have satiated that need. I'm not saying you shouldn't consider an MFA, just that you do have options that are available to you right now so you don't have to wait. 

*I know that a terminal degree will give you more opportunities to apply to faculty positions at 4 years as opposed to the lecturer/ adjunct positions we could apply for with a non-terminal MA. 

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On 12/14/2018 at 9:32 AM, seizing said:

Biggest piece of advice I can give comes from my theater professors from my UG in that you can relatively craft your own graduate program, sans terminal degree, right now. One of the biggest draws of an MFA is that you can teach at a college level; something we can already do with an MA*. You already have the means to find classes that give you similar training to that of a grad program, but you can sort of curate it how you'd like. I really wanted to go to a grad program which had a nice sequence in clowning and mask work. I didn't get in, but I was able to find classes in clowning and mime that have satiated that need. I'm not saying you shouldn't consider an MFA, just that you do have options that are available to you right now so you don't have to wait. 

To be very honest, I'm less interested in the training that comes with a degree in acting and more interested in the exposure and connections. I missed the boat on doing any kind of youth acting at all and on building up an acting CV, and I've always felt that by missing that boat I also missed out on the possibility of being "discovered" and by extension of being successful. The only reason I would do an MFA is because I don't think there's any other way to break into screen acting at age 24 with nothing but university theater experience – it's always seemed to me like the people who are able to find success in acting do so because they began acting at a very young age and had agents who were getting them high-profile auditions by age 16 (of course there are exceptions to this but it seems most of the exceptions just got exceptionally lucky by knowing someone or being stumbled upon).

Acting is loads of fun and I'd love to continue doing it just for the thrill of it whether or not I found ~success~ (by which I guess I mean not needing a day job), but I wouldn't switch gears from English to acting and go get the MFA if I knew it would just lead to acting in local theater on the weekends or teaching drama. So I'm not sure if there's a path that's right for me here. I say this to a forum full of people who know much more about this than I do so – any thoughts? : )

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On 12/15/2018 at 2:15 PM, Indecisive Poet said:

To be very honest, I'm less interested in the training that comes with a degree in acting and more interested in the exposure and connections. I missed the boat on doing any kind of youth acting at all and on building up an acting CV, and I've always felt that by missing that boat I also missed out on the possibility of being "discovered" and by extension of being successful. The only reason I would do an MFA is because I don't think there's any other way to break into screen acting at age 24 with nothing but university theater experience – it's always seemed to me like the people who are able to find success in acting do so because they began acting at a very young age and had agents who were getting them high-profile auditions by age 16 (of course there are exceptions to this but it seems most of the exceptions just got exceptionally lucky by knowing someone or being stumbled upon).

 Acting is loads of fun and I'd love to continue doing it just for the thrill of it whether or not I found ~success~ (by which I guess I mean not needing a day job), but I wouldn't switch gears from English to acting and go get the MFA if I knew it would just lead to acting in local theater on the weekends or teaching drama. So I'm not sure if there's a path that's right for me here. I say this to a forum full of people who know much more about this than I do so – any thoughts? : )

So there's a lot to unpack here. Here are my thoughts:

As much as I understand the exposure and connections aspect of wanting to be in an MFA program, IMHO, the desire to further train and develop your skill and craft has to be paramount. From my friends that have already gone through MFAs, you're working to your bones day in and day out, five to six days a week depending on the project and program. Are you given exposure and connections your final year through an industry showcase? Yes, absolutely. But that industry showcase isn't guaranteed to get you anywhere in the industry. You may have some people interested in you and you may get representation but that representation isn't guaranteed to get you any roles, etc. There's no rhyme or reason to this part of the universe, it just is and you have to give yourself over to the very real possibility of absolutely crashing and burning.

The idea that you can't break into screen acting past 24 isn't true, IMHO. Speaking purely from knowledge, Lupita N'yongo had a single professional credit, a short for MTV, when she was accepted to Yale Drama and then went on to win an Oscar for her first film. Plenty of actors don't start until their 30s, like Alan Rickman. You are correct, though, in saying that those stars got lucky in knowing someone or starting early (Emma Stone, JLaw, etc). 

Can you clarify for me what you mean by "just lead to acting in local theater on the weekends?" Are you mentioning community theatre? Because, if so, IMO, if you have an MFA and are actively pursuing your career, you shouldn't be working at the community theatre level because that's all "for the love of it," for better terms and it's what people do as a hobby rather than a vocation. There are, however, plenty of smaller theatres that are professional in nature (ie. Equity, paying their talent, etc) that only run shows on weekends though in order to fray operational costs. But I also know MFA grads that have found other career paths and do only do community theatre now because they aren't actively pursuing acting or a similar career path and want to do it for fun. If I can ask, what is wrong about teaching drama? For me, the theatre is full of people who are exceptional at what they do and choose to teach full-time or part-time because they understand the need to "send the elevator back down for someone else." If that isn't your primary focus in obtaining an MFA, cool, but to avoid the path all together because you may "have to" teach to make ends meet seems.... I don't know, it just left an impression on me.

TL;DR: I can't tell you if an MFA is the right path for you. Nor can anyone else. That has to come to you through you. I can only offer you my perspective: I have decided that being happy in my work life is a non-negotiable for me. This is the only thing I can imagine myself doing and being genuinely happy in my work life. Amidst all the crap it throws at me, all the curveballs, all the disappointments and heartbreaks, this line of work makes me happy and even when I hate it, I still love it. That's why I decided to commit to an MFA. 

So that's me and my two cents, which you can take with a grain of salt as I'm some random internet 20something. Good luck to you! :) 

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13 hours ago, HopingForMFA said:

The idea that you can't break into screen acting past 24 isn't true, IMHO. Speaking purely from knowledge, Lupita N'yongo had a single professional credit, a short for MTV, when she was accepted to Yale Drama and then went on to win an Oscar for her first film. Plenty of actors don't start until their 30s, like Alan Rickman. You are correct, though, in saying that those stars got lucky in knowing someone or starting early (Emma Stone, JLaw, etc). 

Just out of curiosity, I Wikipedia-d these two and it always seems to be a similar discouraging (for me) story – sure, Lupita's only professional credit was the MTV short but she had an undergraduate degree in theater, had been acting unprofessionally all her life, and first broke into the industry by working as a PA for several years. Rickman's story is similar. Of course I recognize that these are just two random examples you've pulled up but in my time digging for someone who can inspire me, I have yet to find anyone successful who didn't see a stage until 23, has no education in theater and no credits outside of university.

13 hours ago, HopingForMFA said:

As much as I understand the exposure and connections aspect of wanting to be in an MFA program, IMHO, the desire to further train and develop your skill and craft has to be paramount. From my friends that have already gone through MFAs, you're working to your bones day in and day out, five to six days a week depending on the project and program. Are you given exposure and connections your final year through an industry showcase? Yes, absolutely. But that industry showcase isn't guaranteed to get you anywhere in the industry. You may have some people interested in you and you may get representation but that representation isn't guaranteed to get you any roles, etc. There's no rhyme or reason to this part of the universe, it just is and you have to give yourself over to the very real possibility of absolutely crashing and burning.

This makes perfect sense and is really my concern. That isn't to say I wouldn't enjoy the program – I would love to do nothing but work my ass off acting for a couple years. But I could also do that on my own if I wanted to, so for me the purpose of the MFA would be to try to propel a mid-20s person who has a very limited background in theater into the screen acting world. And I don't know enough about the MFA or the industry to know if that would be worth it or not – it's like you say, would I be glad I had switched from my current grad school track in life to acting if I end up crashing and burning?

13 hours ago, HopingForMFA said:

Can you clarify for me what you mean by "just lead to acting in local theater on the weekends?" Are you mentioning community theatre? Because, if so, IMO, if you have an MFA and are actively pursuing your career, you shouldn't be working at the community theatre level because that's all "for the love of it," for better terms and it's what people do as a hobby rather than a vocation. There are, however, plenty of smaller theatres that are professional in nature (ie. Equity, paying their talent, etc) that only run shows on weekends though in order to fray operational costs. But I also know MFA grads that have found other career paths and do only do community theatre now because they aren't actively pursuing acting or a similar career path and want to do it for fun. If I can ask, what is wrong about teaching drama? For me, the theatre is full of people who are exceptional at what they do and choose to teach full-time or part-time because they understand the need to "send the elevator back down for someone else." If that isn't your primary focus in obtaining an MFA, cool, but to avoid the path all together because you may "have to" teach to make ends meet seems.... I don't know, it just left an impression on me.

Re: "just acting on the weekends" and "having" to teach – my feelings aren't a knock against either. If I stick with English, I'll 100% be a teacher either at university level or high school. My other (read: main) interest in life is writing, so my plan has always been teach to make ends meet until I can write full time and don't need the day job. Luckily, it just so happens that I love literature and enjoy teaching so I will be perfectly happy even if I go my whole life without being able to survive solely on my writing. But teaching theater for whatever reason doesn't interest me.

The other key thing for me is that screen acting is what really interests me. I enjoy acting in the theater but I wouldn't want to do it as a career, I don't think. I'd rather be writing. So if this is where the MFA lands me – smaller, professional theaters – it's not that there's anything inherently wrong with them; it's just that that isn't my interest.

I'd written out some other things but the post was getting overly long and I'm realizing that more than anything this just seems like a me problem, haha. My biggest concern right now is that I don't have the experience level required to get into an MFA program and while I can build that up over the next few years, I plan to apply to English PhD programs and creative writing MFA programs next year. It isn't realistic for me to apply to acting MFAs at the same time because the CV for that part of my life just isn't there yet. And if I get into a PhD program, I'll attend that for 6 years and that's acting kind of down the drain, I think! So all in all it's just an existential conundrum to think about... ?

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 12/17/2018 at 9:11 PM, HopingForMFA said:

Y'all, I finally found my Shakespearean comedic. Which is, ironically, from a tragedy.

So exciting! 

Auditions for me start in just a little over 2 weeks! Getting super excited!! I decided to expand my applications and have 7 auditions set up for Juilliard, Yale, NYU, Columbia, Brown, UCSD and CWRU. 

How's everyone doing? 

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On 1/2/2019 at 3:29 PM, TheClaraBell said:

So exciting! 

Auditions for me start in just a little over 2 weeks! Getting super excited!! I decided to expand my applications and have 7 auditions set up for Juilliard, Yale, NYU, Columbia, Brown, UCSD and CWRU. 

 How's everyone doing? 

I feel good to okay. I went to NYC to get some coaching from a Yale grad and she said I have a lot to offer as an actor and to these programs and it made me feel really good. Now it's just up to the powers that be. I'm excited to show them me. :)

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4 hours ago, HopingForMFA said:

I feel good to okay. I went to NYC to get some coaching from a Yale grad and she said I have a lot to offer as an actor and to these programs and it made me feel really good. Now it's just up to the powers that be. I'm excited to show them me. :)

Great! That is really great... always good to hear positive feedback from people who have gone though these programs. My coach is also a Yale grad ?

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi! Thank you. What exactly do you mean by they opened apps? Application time? I read through this thread as well, thank you for all you have shared. Do you recall when  and how you heard a decision from CWRU post audition? I know it’s early yet but i’m anxious haha! From the sounds of it my having a few years experience post undergrad (I jus hit my 30s) might be to my advantage with that program, I hope! ? Also wishing you and everyone the best of luck with the schools you are now pursuing! ???

Thanks again! 

Sarah :)

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On 2/4/2019 at 11:33 AM, HiC said:

hi! Dropping in on this post. I'm still waiting to hear from UNC, Case/CPH, FSU, and Knoxeville!!

Hi! Still waiting hear from Case/CPH as well! Is this your first time auditioning for MFA programs? Where did you audition? How did it go? Looking for any and all insight! Best of luck with all the schools you applied to!! ?? :) 

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