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Boolakanaka

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Everything posted by Boolakanaka

  1. I would find that hard to believe under the current environment. Yield at the tippy top schools is always high, and especially so this year.
  2. At best, this is anecdotal, and at worse, unsubstantiated and just flippant. I have been a visiting faculty at one of the premier schools several times in my career, and that is is just not true. While there are certainly some individuals that have significant resources, it’s an outlier, and moreover, most of the students I have observed with families in tow, have fairly limited resources.
  3. Yield in past years have already been close to 90 percent.
  4. D is doing a similar program (genomic science) at UW and loves it.
  5. Gerald brings real gravitas and explanation to the role of Indian Country and its juxtaposition to conservation topics.
  6. I would say in terms of overall programming and the other elements of the total Yale academic community -yes. But, Dorceta is the GOAT, and still has produced and continues to produce on the most seminal study on the topic. And I say this as someone who is double blue.
  7. Hmmmn, I can’t speak to every organization (I did previously work for Boston Consulting) but if you are coming out of undergrad, much of it is limited to the school you attended. Thus, places like Yale, Harvard, Princeton, MIT, Stanford, etc....are part of the usual suspects. More than a few of these are not STEM or from the business side; so there is an appreciable deference to the quality of the undergrad education.
  8. Hmmmn, divorced from their graduate programs—not sure about that at all. YLS , HLS, Harvard MBA, in short these represent the benchmark of their respective professional programs, and they are leagues ahead of most programs—this has little to do with undergraduate education.
  9. Both Bain and Boston are starting recently minted undergrads with comp at about 90kplus. Thus, within two-three years, six figures is an easy lift.
  10. While certainly cumbersome and probably not the most efficient, I doubt that these remotely approaches the threshold of being something that can be litigated.
  11. I suggest you take a close look at the recruiters and what placements look like: at the upper tier, Harvard and Princeton, whether it’s correct or not, have an outsized influence in many think tanks, foundations and larger non-profits.
  12. Former faculty at Yale SOM here , as you are well aware, this track is profoundly competitive-yield typically hovers around 90 percent, give or take a couple of ticks.
  13. Formerly taught at Yale SoM, the PhD track in business is notoriously tough generally speaking, and especially so at Yale. They are pretty neutral by conscription about backgrounds in investment as SoM was really the only Ivy b-school without an emphasis on finance/investment for a very long time, and in fact, was only within the last 35 years did it actually have a MBA program. If I’m correct they have north of 300 plus applicants for roughly made a dozen (could be a couple more) admissions.
  14. Ditto ditto to GSG. Not every institution and program is created equally—is it fair or even accurate—no—but it is the reality of the situation. The name of the institution will not carry you through your entire career, but a very small group of those on the tippy top, will allow you an entrance and an appreciable conversation to certain opportunities that most will not ever be able to entertain, this is especially true in the first five years of post-graduation. I mentioned earlier that the Jackson School at Yale, which is IR focused just got an internal infusion of 150 million, a significan
  15. What’s the old saw—the rich get richer. While its has an international affairs focus, this is sure to attract much more student interest, as one of the areas that is certain to be shored up is student aid. Like most graduate/professional programs at Yale, this means meeting full demonstrated need.
  16. Just to chime in, but I have many colleagues and friends that work for larger non-profits, think along the lines of Ford, Hewlett, MacArthur, Rand, Walton, Gates—all doing serious policy level work, and without exception, they all make 200,000 plus a year.
  17. Actually, it’s not that optimistic, but rather straight in the middle of the road of federal government salary. If you already had 3-4 years of germane experience and graduated from one of the top 8-10 public policy programs, getting hired at a GS-12/13, which is considered either on the lower tier of management or a specialist would not be overly ambitious: the salary range for the DC area would be starting in the low six figures up to about 140k. These are not political appointed positions or senior management but rather pedestrian positions in the greater scheme of federal government jobs.
  18. While an entry level position is certainly obtainable with just an undergraduate degree, if you look at most of the larger foundations and their senior and executive staff, you will find come some of the most educated individuals in any sector —many with multiple professional and graduate degrees. It is one of the most over-educated industries around....
  19. Nice succinct and lucid synopsis. Further, we are now seeing increasing intersectionality between public policy and philanthropy, e.g. climate change, public health, issues of equity and race, etc, and for those reasons, there are real motivations to consider a different path. As always, I’ll place a plug for the college of Eli, specifically, the Yale School of Management, which has historically been thought of as the incubator of executive management in the non-profit sector, and in fact, only turned to the traditional MBA model in the 80s. I know scores of folks who now work for ma
  20. Wrong site. This is for a PhD in law. Check out toplawschools.com
  21. To clarify: is the PhD also in law (only a handful of schools have a PhD in law) or in a separate topic?
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