Jump to content

crazygirl2012

Members
  • Content Count

    271
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About crazygirl2012

  • Rank
    Mocha
  • Birthday 10/02/1990

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    USA
  • Interests
    Worrying too much. Sleeping too little. Laughing, loving, and learning.
  • Application Season
    Already Attending
  • Program
    Social Psychology Ph.D.

Recent Profile Visitors

5,511 profile views
  1. Five sections?!? That is a ton of TAing. Does your PI have a grant, or do you mean that the department allocated a lot of money for his students? If he can support you on a grant, you should definitely be able to do more research than teaching. But your assistantship may still be dependent on the department's needs. Rather than asking for a different assignment, I would just start a conversation about it. You could mention that you're concerned about getting off-track with research, and say that you felt that a lot of your time went to TAing. I feel comfortable being open with my advisor because he doesn't take conversations like that the wrong way. But the way you approach the subject should be dependent on your relationship with your PI.
  2. Whoa, that does sound bad. I'm alright with a bit of "initiation", being put in my place if I cross a line, any of that, but your department sounds unnecessarily cruel. Of course there's some variation in personalities in my department, and not all professors in the department are really warm and supportive, but most are. Have you spoken with any older students about this? Maybe they always do this to the first years, and start to accept you as you get older? It's still wrong, but maybe there's a light at the end of the tunnel.
  3. I'm a first year trying to figure out what to do with breaks. I'm taking about 2 weeks off (12/18-1/2). I wish I wasn't going to be gone for so long, but I had some pressure from family to make it a long vacation. Next year, I think I'll tell them I can't take that much time off. There are no explicit rules in my department. The amount of time people take off (or work from home, or "work" from home) varies a lot. I am expected to keep up with my assistantship (not a TAship this semester, but similar) during break, as well as research.
  4. Try not to panic until you're sure you need to disclose it. And even then, it isn't so bad. Hell, I was almost expelled from college entirely as a freshman because I got too many drinking tickets. Nobody got hurt or anything like that, I was just an idiotic (and apparently quite loud) 17/18 year old. When I saw that question on grad school applications, I went to the associate dean at my undergrad university and found out that I was never on official probation and therefore didn't need to disclose it at all. I just read it again, and I am almost certain it doesn't even apply to you. So no need to worry! They'll see the grades on your transcript, probably gloss over them because it was your freshman year, and move on. You're not a criminal. FuzzyLogician-- I don't think the OP actually committed any sort of offense. Academic probation is, to the best of my knowledge, just a semester of really poor grades. I agree that you need to have it addressed in some way, whether in your personal statement or in a recommendation letter, but I really do not think you need to answer "yes" to that question.
  5. Ha, I took Ritalin without a prescription once in college. Once. I decided to try it around 4am the morning of an exam. I crashed in the middle of the exam and got a C. Not a fun experience. I don't know of anyone in my program who takes it, but some probably do.
  6. I understand why you accepted the offer, and I would struggle in that kind of environment too. Is there any chance that you'll eventually be able to work with your interests? Will you get more of a choice as you gain independence in the lab?
  7. Thanks, all! It's easier for me to pick out areas for improvement than to acknowledge taking care of my health and personal life as a good thing to do. I'll try to stop worrying about it.
  8. I have a problem I never expected to have in grad school: I'm not busy enough. My coursework is, for the most part, much less challenging than my second half of undergrad. I am involved in several research projects (including 3 that will hopefully turn into first-author publications for me someday) and my advisor is happy with my progress. But I'm used to being completely immersed in work nearly all the time, and that just doesn't happen anymore. It's true that I've gotten more efficient and I'm much less crazy than I was in undergrad, but I just don't think grad school is painful enough. I know it's my responsibility to be self-motivated, and for the most part, I am. Next semester, I want to do more reading every day and try to keep up the pace. But it's hard to get used to this. A few others in my cohort feel the same way I do. We're not in a bad program by any means-- it's not top-ranked, but it's respectable, and our grads end up with good jobs. Has anyone else dealt with this? I hate feeling like I'm not a real grad student just because I sleep 7 hours a night.
  9. Yes. And many are not. Personally, I'm not lonely in grad school, but I was in undergrad. Things can turn around.
  10. Psychology, 4/5. Really, my only disappointments are classes (most here not as rigorous as I thought they'd be) and department politics (I stay out of it as much as possible but it makes me nervous). Things I like: My current research, TAing, this part of the country. Things I love: My cohort, my advisor, and the directions I hope to take my research in. The people here are really the best part!
  11. If you do notice people treating you differently, I'd advise you to be patient and just keep being as mild-mannered and respectful as possible. You never know what people have been through themselves. Because of my own personal history, I'd honestly be a little wary around a colleague after hearing that news, even though I'd want to treat him fairly. You can't change your past, but you can influence your future. I'm not saying you should have to change your whole personality or act unnatural around your colleagues. Just try to let your conduct speak for itself.
  12. Hi, I've been looking for a native speaker to read my sop in linguistics. Can you help me with that please. I really start feeling so desperate.

  13. I would have been caught off-guard too, but I think that dropping the class would be a bit of an overreaction. Who knows, maybe the professor was having a bad day and now feels bad about being so harsh. Or maybe not. Regardless, I understand why you're bothered by it, but I would advise you to stick it out.
  14. Did you move to a new area for grad school? I'm originally from New York, but I've lived in the Midwest for many years. People here are much more polite and less straightforward than they are back East. It would be harder for Midwestern students to criticize each other's work. I agree with Eigen that a discussion about personal attacks vs. constructive criticism is in order. The book that SeriousSillyPutty recommended sounds good too! I don't agree with your student either, but I give you credit for taking his words into account and thinking about your approach. It surprises me that he's having this strong of a reaction and he's not even critiquing his own classmates' work yet. Critical thinking is one of the most important skills to develop in college!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.