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Sapp, Erin Grayson. “Patriarchy, Paternity and Papas: Reproductive Technologies and Parenthood in Science Fiction.” The Sex is Out of This World: Essays on the Carnal Side of Science Fiction.

LOVE this article, it talks about the feminist discourse on extra uterine gestation and its potential impact on gender ideation and equality. It is fascinating.

Bost, Suzanne. “Gloria Anzaldúa’s Mestiza Pain: Mexican Sacrifice, Chicana Embodiment, and Feminist Politics.”

I love Bost, she’s why I applied to Loyola, and this article is just...so good. 

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54 minutes ago, mandelbulb said:

this brings up a great topic. favorite articles/chapters anyone? things you end up referencing frequently in your work?

Butler's Giving an Account of Oneself (the whole book I suppose) somehow finds its way into most things I write, lol. And Rubin's Thinking Sex. Roderick Ferguson's work in general, but “Administering Sexuality" sticks with me as does M. Jacqui Alexander's “Not Just (Any) Body Can Be a Citizen." And if anyone is interested in animal studies, the article "Bestiality and the Queering of the Human Animal," blew my mind. (I think I have pdfs of all of these for sharing)

@Bopie5 have you seen Stryker's short doc about Compton's Cafeteria? It's really great https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-WASW9dRBU

@kendalldinniene that anthology on sci-fi & reproduction sounds amazing! I don't know if you work at all with kinship but Victoria Pitts Taylor work has been really great.

Edited by savay

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1 minute ago, savay said:

Butler's Giving an Account of Oneself (the whole book I suppose) somehow finds its way into most things I write, lol. And Rubin's Thinking Sex. Roderick Ferguson's work in general, but “Administering Sexuality" sticks with me as does M. Jacqui Alexander's “Not Just (Any) Body Can Be a Citizen." And if anyone is interested in animal studies, the article "Bestiality and the Queering of the Human Animal," blew my mind. (I think I have pdfs of all of these for sharing)

Please share!

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6 minutes ago, kendalldinniene said:

Bost, Suzanne. “Gloria Anzaldúa’s Mestiza Pain: Mexican Sacrifice, Chicana Embodiment, and Feminist Politics.”

oh man that reminds me that Anzaldúa's Borderlands is beautiful

 

if anyone's up for it, feel free to drop your favorite PDFs in this little folder?
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1TyCdpFDWdXFpwA21aX39b7SxFnKcnxZC?usp=sharing

Edited by mandelbulb

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9 minutes ago, savay said:

Butler's Giving an Account of Oneself (the whole book I suppose) somehow finds its way into most things I write, lol. And Rubin's Thinking Sex. Roderick Ferguson's work in general, but “Administering Sexuality" sticks with me as does M. Jacqui Alexander's “Not Just (Any) Body Can Be a Citizen." And if anyone is interested in animal studies, the article "Bestiality and the Queering of the Human Animal," blew my mind. (I think I have pdfs of all of these for sharing)

@Bopie5 have you seen Stryker's short doc about Compton's Cafeteria? It's really great https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-WASW9dRBU

@savayPLEASE send all of those PDFs my way. I love Rubin and Butler's work--have you read Butler's interview with Rubin, "Sexual Traffic"? I haven't seen the documentary yet, but now I know what I'm doing tonight!

@mandelbulb Would also love to read the PDFs you mentioned, please send my way!

For me, I think my key articles would be Stryker's Frankenstein piece, Rubin's "The Traffic in Women," Susan Bordo's "The Body and the Reproduction of Femininity," Toril Moi's "From Femininity to Finitude" (as previously discussed), Butler's Bodies That Matter, Lisa Ruddick's "When Nothing Is Cool," and bell hooks's "Feminism: A Movement to End Sexist Oppression" chapter from her book Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center would be the key texts for me. As others do, I have PDFs of all of these if anyone wants them.

EDIT: Adding my PDFs to the folder! What a great idea.

Edited by Bopie5

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+1 to Touching Feeling, particularly "Cybernetic Fold" and "You're So Paranoid." I had a professor who described the day he walked into seminar in grad school after You're So Paranoid came out and everyone in the room was like "I guess this whole enterprise is different now."

Eve Segdwick really was a special lady. Meeting her through and loving her work just a few years after she passed away has been melancholy and a little spooky.

Edited by dilby
quotation marks

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4 minutes ago, dilby said:

Eve Segdwick really was a special lady. Meeting her through and loving her work just a few years after she passed away has been melancholy and a little spooky.

seriously, it really is. did she have any idea while she was alive how many scholars she would impact even after death? a former professor of mine who's at princeton now worked with some of sedgwick's contemporaries while she was in grad school at emory, and that felt so special to me. sedgwick's touch passed down through generations of scholars.

Edited by mandelbulb
i always forget a few words...

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how does one access//add to this mentioned 'folder'?! would love to contribute//peruse! all this sedgwick talk is getting me excited, and I wonder if it's a coincidence that we're all interested///leaning into similar veins

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2 minutes ago, pdh12 said:

I wonder if it's a coincidence that we're all interested///leaning into similar veins

It's because we officially live in THE AFFECTIVE TURN, my friend

dread it, run from it, affect theory still arrives

192058013_ScreenShot2019-01-10at5_27_27PM.jpg.132ee05b8d4b5c5e500cb5978f1867c2.jpg

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So Many Glories. Added the necropolitics to our fecund cropping. I have bits of Butler I could corral, too

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49 minutes ago, mandelbulb said:

if anyone's up for it, feel free to drop your favorite PDFs in this little folder?

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1TyCdpFDWdXFpwA21aX39b7SxFnKcnxZC?usp=sharing

Thanks for making the folder! I've dropped pdfs there.


I added the introduction to Kadji Amin's Disturbing Attachments, on Genet and queer history - as it seemed like there were some other queer theory people here. It makes a really interesting critique of queer studies as a field and its, at times problematic, relation to its objects of study. I also added the intro to Dean Spade's book Normal Life, which is a strikingly lucid legal argument about the administrative erasure of trans existence.


@Bopie5 Traffic in women!! I have read Sexual Traffic - there are some really fun moments there! I remember it being both very theoretical and historical but also super humanizing. Like, I remember some really cute/cheesy jokes? Like about how hot they were for Foucault? I really love Rubin's work, I know some of it is dated, but in undergrad I was an economic anthropologist for a few years and her work reminds me of how much I used to enjoy anthro. Now I use it mostly for work on queer kinship.

Also, @mandelbulb are you at UW (the google drive folder has a uw email)? That's where I'm getting my MA.

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2 minutes ago, savay said:

Thanks for making the folder! I've dropped pdfs there.


I added the introduction to Kadji Amin's Disturbing Attachments, on Genet and queer history - as it seemed like there were some other queer theory people here. It makes a really interesting critique of queer studies as a field and its, at times problematic, relation to its objects of study. I also added the intro to Dean Spade's book Normal Life, which is a strikingly lucid legal argument about the administrative erasure of trans existence.


@Bopie5 Traffic in women!! I have read Sexual Traffic - there are some really fun moments there! I remember it being both very theoretical and historical but also super humanizing. Like, I remember some really cute/cheesy jokes? Like about how hot they were for Foucault? I really love Rubin's work, I know some of it is dated, but in undergrad I was an economic anthropologist for a few years and her work reminds me of how much I used to enjoy anthro. Now I use it mostly for work on queer kinship.

Also, @mandelbulb are you at UW (the google drive folder has a uw email)? That's where I'm getting my MA.

Dean Spade!!! good call. i can't wait to go through all these articles this weekend. 

yeah, i work at UW right now (and i did before my MA too... i can't escape), over at Harborview. how're you liking their program so far? i've heard so many mixed things about the department and their funding situation that i almost didn't apply, but i love Seattle so much and my entire support network is here so i gave in despite the drawbacks i've heard.

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1 hour ago, savay said:

 

@kendalldinniene that anthology on sci-fi & reproduction sounds amazing! I don't know if you work at all with kinship but Victoria Pitts Taylor work has been really great.

I will have to check her out!  I did a little work with queer kinship when I was writing on this very peculiar Victorian novella called A Sunless Heart.  I really enjoyed it.

Also how are you liking UW?  I doubt I'll get in but if I do I'm already stressed about finding housing I can afford.

Edited by kendalldinniene

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1 hour ago, savay said:

Traffic in women!! I have read Sexual Traffic - there are some really fun moments there! I remember it being both very theoretical and historical but also super humanizing. Like, I remember some really cute/cheesy jokes? Like about how hot they were for Foucault? I really love Rubin's work, I know some of it is dated, but in undergrad I was an economic anthropologist for a few years and her work reminds me of how much I used to enjoy anthro. Now I use it mostly for work on queer kinship.

Yes exactly! And I feel like Butler can feel very unapproachable in her theoretical work sometimes, so it was fun to get to see more of her humor than just postmodern/poststructuralist play.

I love Rubin's work too! I don't always agree with her, but I think the way she talks about kinship is still really useful. 

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2 hours ago, mandelbulb said:

 

if anyone's up for it, feel free to drop your favorite PDFs in this little folder?
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1TyCdpFDWdXFpwA21aX39b7SxFnKcnxZC?usp=sharing

Long time lurker.  Thanks for sharing!  This will give me something to read while I am trying not to check my e-mails!  Much appreciated :)

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Also, on an unrelated note, I just had a meeting with my thesis advisor, and she was so incredibly encouraging to me. We were talking about grad apps, and she said "Did you know I'm a second-try PhD? On my first cycle, I didn't get anywhere other than one school. And then I got my MA, and then tried again for my PhD. And let me tell you, on my second try, I got into schools that I didn't get into the first time. But guess what else? I didn't get into schools I got into the first time. Admissions is a mixed bag, and there are so many factors at play. There's nothing wrong with trying again, and there's so many factors out of your control."

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2 minutes ago, Bopie5 said:

Also, on an unrelated note, I just had a meeting with my thesis advisor, and she was so incredibly encouraging to me. We were talking about grad apps, and she said "Did you know I'm a second-try PhD? On my first cycle, I didn't get anywhere other than one school. And then I got my MA, and then tried again for my PhD. And let me tell you, on my second try, I got into schools that I didn't get into the first time. But guess what else? I didn't get into schools I got into the first time. Admissions is a mixed bag, and there are so many factors at play. There's nothing wrong with trying again, and there's so many factors out of your control."

Dang I really need to save my reacts for the posts that count.  This made me feel a lot better ❤️ 

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1 hour ago, mandelbulb said:

yeah, i work at UW right now (and i did before my MA too... i can't escape), over at Harborview. how're you liking their program so far? i've heard so many mixed things about the department and their funding situation that i almost didn't apply, but i love Seattle so much and my entire support network is here so i gave in despite the drawbacks i've heard.

1 hour ago, kendalldinniene said:

I will have to check her out!  I did a little work with queer kinship when I was writing on this very peculiar Victorian novella called A Sunless Heart.  I really enjoyed it.

Also how are you liking UW?  I doubt I'll get in but if I do I'm already stressed about finding housing I can afford.

So I'm actually in the Scandinavian Studies department, but have taken classes in English and have friends in the grad program. Mixed is an accurate descriptor. The impression I get is that the department is large (at least, compared to my department, so YMMV) and doesn't have a defined cohesion in terms of atmosphere - with that said the faculty and grad students I know are wonderful and are doing really amazing work. Funding wise, the entire College of Arts and Sciences is in a difficult place, and I get the sense that English may have over-enrolled or admitted students without adequate funding. I guess, double check that when your acceptances arrive/get any promises in writing, etc. I know procuring funding as an International Student as you advance in the program can become difficult and competitive. But, UW does have some great things to offer: the Simpson humanities center has great programming and funding opportunities, the departmental certificate programs seem to have been revamped and provide great ways to expand your network outside of your department, the library system is robust (I'm abroad on fellowship right now and miss it terribly), the union and grad council are active, and under our current contract we don't have to pay healthcare premiums.

I think support networks are really important - especially for a PhD. I love my department, but have honestly had a hard time adjusting to Seattle (I relocated from Chicago) and that, along with funding worries (I'd really love the opportunity to teach something other than beginning language classes for the next 6 years) and my advisors insisting I apply to Berkeley (where I do have a large friend group/support network) are pretty much the reasons I'm here right now.

Housing is tricky, and perhaps @mandelbulb has better tips here than I do, but if you end up at UW I'm happy to send along my advice. Basically, unless you want to live in a pod, or very far away, roommates are usually the best bet.

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13 minutes ago, savay said:

Housing is tricky, and perhaps @mandelbulb has better tips here than I do, but if you end up at UW I'm happy to send along my advice. Basically, unless you want to live in a pod, or very far away, roommates are usually the best bet.

This is what I'm afraid of.  I'm a crotchety old lady, I do not want anymore roommates unless they are cats or books.

That being said, Scandinavian Studies sounds fascinating!  I hope (besides the library homesickness) you're enjoying your time abroad.  Do you mind my asking what country you are in?  Scandinavia is a dream spot to live for me.

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