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Psyche007

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Psyche007 last won the day on July 16

Psyche007 had the most liked content!

About Psyche007

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    Double Shot

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  • Location
    Florida
  • Application Season
    Already Attending
  • Program
    Clin Psych PhD

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  1. I graduated with my 1st BS (Applied Psych) around age 34, 2nd BS age 38 (Health Science), started clin psych PhD at 42. I think getting a 2 year placement would be great before grad school. If you can supplement with some clinical work and develop yourself with outside interests, reading a wide variety of topics outside of psychology, the chance of you really standing out as an applicant is good.
  2. Can you summarize your research experience into a one or two principles you're observed, learned from, and applied elsewhere? It's a great opportunity to show how you can summarize data into useful and generalizable information. They're going to read your resume, which I imagine will include all the minutiae of your experiences, so I'd avoid repeating anything in your statement that reviewers can find elsewhere. The statement is an opportunity to say something that you can't say elsewhere, something that makes them want to meet you.
  3. For the sake of transparency, it was not a relevant factor for me. I had no formal research experience when I applied. I would look at activities that broaden your world perspective and deepen your character and maturity. Work on being a real thinker, someone who reads and contemplates things deeply to generate meaningful insight. While research experience may be important, the students I am surrounded by that have prior pubs and research experience are ambitious and motivated but don't display any enthusiasm for the process of science. I get the impression that research experience t
  4. My three letters of rec: two PsyDs (a colleague who went to my uni and a professor/employer) and one Microbiology PhD (professor). So technically, the answer is yes.
  5. Good for you! You have much to offer. I'm about to be a 3rd year and I'm 44, haha. Word to the wise: don't look to the majority of your peers for support. They just won't get it. It's not their fault. Make a concerted effort to reach out, network, meet like-minded people with similar life experience. You will probably be on a different developmental level, although there may be some exceptionally mature young people that can relate to you and vice versa.
  6. You could look at Brochu, a social psychgoligist that's part of the faculty in the Clinical Psych dept for PsyD and PhD: https://psychology.nova.edu/faculty/profile/brochu.html However, NSU doesn't offer tuition waiver or stipend, so it's frequently dismissed as a valid option, which I can appreciate.
  7. As I have posted elsewhere, the removal of the GRE will increase the number of unqualified applicants far more than qualified ones. The actual competition you might face probably won't be too much different, but it will be harder to differentiate yourself from the herd. Study for and take the damn GRE anyway and submit if you score well. The quality of your personal statement will come into play. Unless you know your writing is strong, practice writing. Write anything: a poem, an article, a monologue about your favourite pet, whatever. Practice editing. Leave it alone for a few days and c
  8. This is why the removal of the GRE has an negative effect for individuals who, for a variety of legitimate reasons, haven't been able to accrue the types of experience you talk about. As long as the GRE submission remains an option, that's fine. The grad school process of turning students into indiscriminant publication workhorses is damaging academia in general. The emphasis on quantity over quality is especially prevalent in the social sciences. Taking students fresh from undergrad and putting them into this environment perpetuates this issue. Spending time in the workforce can make one
  9. Being outward focused is great and all, but don't neglect the inward focus. One thing you can always do is read. Read from a variety of sources (classic lit, philosophy, anything outside of psych). Be able to articulate your ideas, not just the knowledge you've accumulated from others, develop your vocabulary and view of the world. Examine the position of your rival theorists. Be able to explain the opposition to your work as well as or better than your 'opponents'. I have met with a few applicants who are very experienced and polished. The ones who stand out communicate original tho
  10. Thanks for changing it back, Powers-That-be!
  11. Not a sound in two weeks, eh? My message has still not been read.
  12. As of this posting, my message has not yet been read.
  13. Sure. Just seems odd to criticize research training in a PsyD programme. When I compare my PhD sections to their PsyDs section, there's quite a difference. Although the reality is that my career might suffer due to my age and lack of pedigree, the arrogance of their assumptions belies something really quite distasteful and short-sighted. Luckily, my outspoken and oppositional nature will prevent me from having a chance at any site that supports their kind of thinking, even if I managed to sneak in an interview. I really don't want to be around them. I don't know. I'm sitting here wit
  14. I didn't make it to the internship thread. I made the mistake of searching for my institution in the hopes of finding my people. It's amazing how such high-achieving genius elitists have the time and energy to write detailed threads shitting all over schools they disapprove of, lol.
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