glycoprotein1

Fall 2018 Applicants

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Hi all, 

I thought I would start a new thread since last year's was created about this time a year ago. (Amazing how fast a year flies by!!!)

A little introduction - I'm a longtime lurker with a few years of museum experience and several presentations under my belt.  I'll be targeting MA programs in the history of medicine as well as MD programs.  

I look forward to meeting everyone!

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I was toying with the idea of starting this! I'm glad you did!

I applied to Ph.D programs a couple years ago when I was finished up an MA in Economics and had decided to switch disciplines, but didn't get into anywhere because of my lack of language experience. I was frustrated at the time, but I'm SOOOOOOO glad I decided to do another masters at Yale, because I know so much more about my research interests now and I've had the chance to work on French and German. Hopefully this cycle works out! 

Methodologically I'm interested in the intersection of religion and economics in early modern Europe, but I've also been working on demonic possession in 16th and 17th century England and love that. Still working out the schools I want to apply to! 

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Excellent stuff, this is now my third go at PhD applications so here's hoping for better luck. Modern US history (with all the dire prospects that come with that). Would love to speak to some fellow travellers and get the ball rolling!

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On 6/18/2017 at 2:47 PM, glycoprotein1 said:

Hi all, 

I thought I would start a new thread since last year's was created about this time a year ago. (Amazing how fast a year flies by!!!)

A little introduction - I'm a longtime lurker with a few years of museum experience and several presentations under my belt.  I'll be targeting MA programs in the history of medicine as well as MD programs.  

I look forward to meeting everyone!

Interesting focus! Out of curiosity, what programs are you looking into? Have you considered a joint history of medicine and MD program? A few of those do exist, but I imagine finishing them would take ages. :D 

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1 hour ago, Neist said:

Interesting focus! Out of curiosity, what programs are you looking into? Have you considered a joint history of medicine and MD program? A few of those do exist, but I imagine finishing them would take ages. :D 

At the moment I'm looking at Cambridge, Oxford, Manchester, Toronto, and McGill.  I'm also considering Yale, Duke, Harvard, and Wisconsin, but I'm still recovering from the MCAT and really don't want to study for the GRE lol.  I sure have! I love studying history, but I'm not sure if I want to commit the additional time for the PhD when I know I'd be just as content with a master's degree.  

--Slightly off topic, a friend of mine is in the History of Science program at Oklahoma, you might just well know them! 

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16 hours ago, glycoprotein1 said:

At the moment I'm looking at Cambridge, Oxford, Manchester, Toronto, and McGill.  I'm also considering Yale, Duke, Harvard, and Wisconsin, but I'm still recovering from the MCAT and really don't want to study for the GRE lol.  I sure have! I love studying history, but I'm not sure if I want to commit the additional time for the PhD when I know I'd be just as content with a master's degree.  

--Slightly off topic, a friend of mine is in the History of Science program at Oklahoma, you might just well know them! 

I completely understand. :) Also, did this person start the program last year? Given your location, I think I know who this person is, and if it is this person, I actually shared an office with them for a short period.

Small world!

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5 hours ago, Neist said:

I completely understand. :) Also, did this person start the program last year? Given your location, I think I know who this person is, and if it is this person, I actually shared an office with them for a short period.

Small world!

Yep - small world indeed! 

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Hello!

I'm new to this forum but saw this and thought I'd say hello. I'm a recent grad from a small private college with a BA in history. I'm currently working on applications for University of Texas Austin, Emory University, and Vanderbilt University. I'll be taking the GRE July 15th (wish me luck) and have a publication in the works. My area of focus is the War on Drugs and mass incarceration/policing. Any tips, advice, etc are appreciated!

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3 hours ago, Steph Smith said:

Hello!

I'm new to this forum but saw this and thought I'd say hello. I'm a recent grad from a small private college with a BA in history. I'm currently working on applications for University of Texas Austin, Emory University, and Vanderbilt University. I'll be taking the GRE July 15th (wish me luck) and have a publication in the works. My area of focus is the War on Drugs and mass incarceration/policing. Any tips, advice, etc are appreciated!

you should consider Rutgers — specifically, Donna Murch, who is actually finishing up a book on policing/the war on drugs. 

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On 6/19/2017 at 8:29 PM, glycoprotein1 said:

At the moment I'm looking at Cambridge, Oxford, Manchester, Toronto, and McGill.  I'm also considering Yale, Duke, Harvard, and Wisconsin, but I'm still recovering from the MCAT and really don't want to study for the GRE lol.  I sure have! I love studying history, but I'm not sure if I want to commit the additional time for the PhD when I know I'd be just as content with a master's degree.  

--Slightly off topic, a friend of mine is in the History of Science program at Oklahoma, you might just well know them! 

Hi Glycoprotein1, if you are thinking about doing a MA in history of medicine in Canada, Toronto and McGill are undoubtedly the best two choices. Toronto has a separate MA in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, and one of the three history tracks is History of Medicine and Life Sciences. It is a non-thesis program but I guess you can do a major research paper out of it. They have a number of prominent medical history scholars such as Lucia Dacome (early modern), Nikolai Krementsov (Soviet Russia), Marga Vicedo and Paul Thompson (evolution), and also a few others working on the anthropological and philosophical aspects of medicine. Alternatively, you can apply to the MA of the History Department and write a major research paper with the renowned Edward Shorter (psychiatry) (but I don't know if he is still taking students).

McGill is very strong in medical history as well: Faith Wallis (medieval), George Weisz (20thC, health), Andrea Tone (US, sexual/psychiatrical), Thomas Schlich (surgery) and David Wright (Canada/UK, mental/hospital). You can do a MA in Medical + 1) History (non-thesis), 2) Anthropology (thesis) or 3) Sociology (thesis), or a MA in History (thesis) with any of the above professors. 

You may also consider other Canadian schools, such as Queens (Jacalyn Duffin (miracle/saint/death)), UWO (Shelley McKellar (medical technology/biography)), McMaster (Ellen Amster (Islamic, public health)), and Calgary (Frank W. Stahnisch (physiology/neuroscience)).

Keep in mind that these Canadian programs can be finished in one year and are way cheaper than the US ones. And they don't require the GRE!! 

 

Edited by VAZ

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Hi all,

I graduated in December with a BA from a large public university. I currently work at a women's health center and also as a research assistant for one of my professors. My area of interest is women's history with a focus on reproductive rights and healthcare in the US. I'm trying nab the elusive funded MA. Good luck to all!

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17 hours ago, VAZ said:

Hi Glycoprotein1, if you are thinking about doing a MA in history of medicine in Canada, Toronto and McGill are undoubtedly the best two choices. Toronto has a separate MA in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, and one of the three history tracks is History of Medicine and Life Sciences. It is a non-thesis program but I guess you can do a major research paper out of it. They have a number of prominent medical history scholars such as Lucia Dacome (early modern), Nikolai Krementsov (Soviet Russia), Marga Vicedo and Paul Thompson (evolution), and also a few others working on the anthropological and philosophical aspects of medicine. Alternatively, you can apply to the MA of the History Department and write a major research paper with the renowned Edward Shorter (psychiatry) (but I don't know if he is still taking students).

McGill is very strong in medical history as well: Faith Wallis (medieval), George Weisz (20thC, health), Andrea Tone (US, sexual/psychiatrical), Thomas Schlich (surgery) and David Wright (Canada/UK, mental/hospital). You can do a MA in Medical + 1) History (non-thesis), 2) Anthropology (thesis) or 3) Sociology (thesis), or a MA in History (thesis) with any of the above professors. 

You may also consider other Canadian schools, such as Queens (Jacalyn Duffin (miracle/saint/death)), UWO (Shelley McKellar (medical technology/biography)), McMaster (Ellen Amster (Islamic, public health)), and Calgary (Frank W. Stahnisch (physiology/neuroscience)).

Keep in mind that these Canadian programs can be finished in one year and are way cheaper than the US ones. And they don't require the GRE!! 

 

Wow, excellent information VAZ.  Thank you for your help! 

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Nice to meet you all! I'm an incoming senior and am planning to apply to graduate schools that are strong in Public History and Indigenous History. I am also pretty interested in Architectural History, Popular Culture, Literary History, and History of Science (especially astronomy). My undergrad thesis plays into Public History, Indigenous History, and Architectural History. I'm about to depart on a study abroad program but once I get back in August I need to nail down my focus for my field for grad schools. I'm looking into both US and Canadian (so much cheaper!) program and am especially interested in UBC. I feel a bit overwhelmed since I'm kind of an anxious person and am also graduating undergrad at 21 (HS community college credits, which is pretty common in WA state) so I feel pretty young to enter a Masters/PhD program. Any advice is really appreciated!

Edited by Lily9

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Hi everyone!  I discovered this site about a week ago and decided to join.  I'm currently in the latter stages of my MA in history, with one more course, oral comps and the Master's thesis to complete.  Plan to finish my thesis by the end of next Spring.  I was wrestling with the idea of applying to 2018 PhD programs for several months and finally made up my mind to do it this week.  My main interest is 19th Century U.S. History, with a secondary interest in Modern Britain.

Some brief background info about me: Earned a BA in Psychology and an MPA; then worked in budget management for 25+ years.  Took early retirement after prolonged stress led to medical problems.  Once I retired, I started on the road to recovery.  After several years enjoying reading everything under the sun, I found learning history especially enjoyable.  Knowing myself, I knew I needed a structured environment to sustain the interest, so I enrolled in the MA program.  I dipped my feet slowly at first by taking one course, and found I was more motivated than I thought.  I took a full load for the next two semesters and found I also had stamina.  With the encouragement of my professors, I am taking the full plunge and hope to be accepted to at least one PhD program.  My main concern is being denied because of my age, but I am going to apply anyway.  Looking forward to gain wisdom from all the experienced grad students here.  Good luck to everyone applying for the next go around.     

 

 

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I'm interested in history programs, but I have no prior coursework in history from my undergraduate work (I majored in Psychology, with most of the rest of my classes in literature and sociology).

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1 hour ago, infovore said:

I'm interested in history programs, but I have no prior coursework in history from my undergraduate work (I majored in Psychology, with most of the rest of my classes in literature and sociology).

I'm starting my phd in the fall in European History, and I'm coming straight from a BA in visual arts! (I did minor in History, and tailored a lot of my coursework the last year towards my research interests, however.) I do know that when I was looking at programs, at least as far as phd goes; admittedly, I didn't look into MA programs because I knew I wanted to go straight for the phd, but a lot of them required previous history coursework, or equivalent hours in a closely-related field.

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7 hours ago, infovore said:

I'm interested in history programs, but I have no prior coursework in history from my undergraduate work (I majored in Psychology, with most of the rest of my classes in literature and sociology).

Apply to MA programs first.  No question.  You'll have a chance to get your feet wet in history courses and decide if earning a history PhD is for you.

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Hello all!

I'm a new member. I graduated from a US university with a BA in History and I'm currently in Hong Kong doing my Mphil. Schools I'm considering Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, Yale, Chicago, UCLA, and UC Berkeley. I'll be studying medieval Chinese history, focusing on state employment and state capacity.

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8 hours ago, lordtiandao said:

Hello all!

I'm a new member. I graduated from a US university with a BA in History and I'm currently in Hong Kong doing my Mphil. Schools I'm considering Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, Yale, Chicago, UCLA, and UC Berkeley. I'll be studying medieval Chinese history, focusing on state employment and state capacity.

Hello, welcome! All top universities, I share your ambition! So you are interested in the political/economic history of Middle Imperial China? ("Medieval China" is a very problematic term). Yale (Perdue + Hansen) and Berkeley (Tackett --- Hymes' student, + Nylan) are terrific. Columbia (Hymes), UCLA (von Glahn) and Harvard (Szonyi - Late Imperial mostly) might also do. Peterson (Princeton) is more an intellectual historian and plus he is reaching 80. Chicago, however, is known for its modern Chinese history, and I believe, correct me if I'm wrong, nobody is working on the pre-Qing era (unless you want to study with Burns who is actually an early modern Japanese medical historian).

Well, another "right" person that first came into my mind, who is also from a big name university that you didn't mention to my surprise, is Mark Edward Lewis from Stanford. He works on political and some economic history of early China until the end of the Tang Dynasty (too early?). Have you also looked at any other place, such as Penn (Christopher Atwood), Pittsburg (Ruth Mostern) and Michigan (Christian de Pee)?

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7 hours ago, VAZ said:

Hello, welcome! All top universities, I share your ambition! So you are interested in the political/economic history of Middle Imperial China? ("Medieval China" is a very problematic term). Yale (Perdue + Hansen) and Berkeley (Tackett --- Hymes' student, + Nylan) are terrific. Columbia (Hymes), UCLA (von Glahn) and Harvard (Szonyi - Late Imperial mostly) might also do. Peterson (Princeton) is more an intellectual historian and plus he is reaching 80. Chicago, however, is known for its modern Chinese history, and I believe, correct me if I'm wrong, nobody is working on the pre-Qing era (unless you want to study with Burns who is actually an early modern Japanese medical historian).

Well, another "right" person that first came into my mind, who is also from a big name university that you didn't mention to my surprise, is Mark Edward Lewis from Stanford. He works on political and some economic history of early China until the end of the Tang Dynasty (too early?). Have you also looked at any other place, such as Penn (Christopher Atwood), Pittsburg (Ruth Mostern) and Michigan (Christian de Pee)?

1

Wow, thanks for all the recommendations! Yes I realize medieval is more of a European history characterization, so Mid-Imperial is correct. I'm studying the Song-Yuan-Ming transition, maybe more political/fiscal than political/economic. For Harvard, Szonyi seems to be doing late Imperial and Modern. I was thinking of applying to Peter Bol, who is actually the adviser of my adviser here in Hong Kong. Yes, Chicago is probably going to be dropped from my list, unless Pomeranz is willing to take students who do Mid-Imperial history.

Christopher Atwood and Christian de Pee are definitely both on my list.Mark Edward Lewis (he might be too early yes) and von Glahn I am not sure right now, I would have to discuss it with my advisers first. I know von Glahn studies this period but I'm very disinclined to apply to him. I'm considering R. Bin Wong instead. It's a shame Nicola di Cosmo isn't taking any students. My adviser highly recommends him.

Edited by lordtiandao

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Hi, I'm a long time lurker and will be applying to MA programs this fall. I'm one of those older students who didn't start a BA until um, shall we just say a certain age of "maturity." I'm headed into my final year of undergraduate work and recently gave my first conference presentation. 

I'm interested in Anglo-Norman studies and am currently narrowing down where I plan to apply - not top tier. I'm taking the GRE in September. 

 

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9 minutes ago, NotAlice said:

I'm interested in Anglo-Norman studies and am currently narrowing down where I plan to apply - not top tier.

I am sure this is not the last time I will give this advice to this year's applicants: apply to the top tier (roughly, top 20 programs). In fact, you should only apply to the top tier, and don't go if you don't get in. 

Edited by telkanuru

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10 minutes ago, telkanuru said:

I am sure this is not the last time I will give this advice to this year's applicants: apply to the top tier (roughly, top 20 programs). In fact, you should only apply to the top tier, and don't go if you don't get in. 

Are there top tier programs offering funding to MA students? I'm undecided on the PhD and will most likely have to take time off in between if I opt to go that direction. 

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1 hour ago, telkanuru said:

I am sure this is not the last time I will give this advice to this year's applicants: apply to the top tier (roughly, top 20 programs). In fact, you should only apply to the top tier, and don't go if you don't get in. 

I second it. To throw my two cents, I was once very lured to put second or third tier programs onto my list since I saw a few profs from those schools that fit me the most. But I changed my mind.

because, 1) If to become someone you have to follow his path, you should go to the institution where he got his PhD from, instead of the institution where he ends up teaching. Mostly, your POIs graduated from top ten/twenty programs, and you ought to do the same. 

2) Look at the current graduate student profiles and see which undergrad schools the PhD candidates came from. If they don't even belong to the same level/world as yours, you will make your decision then (to not apply).

If I have to work extremely hard for 5-7 years somewhere, I would rather do it at a prestigious university/program. It will make me happy and the experience worthwhile.

BTW, my question for you: what do you think about those big state universities, such as Rutgers, Minnesota, Indiana, Ohio State and UIUC (Wisconsin and Michigan obviously should not count here, and possibly also excluding UNC and UVA), which lie closely to the top tier and have fabulous history departments, but they as universities are not comparable to the Ivys or quasi-Ivys. Does the general ranking / overall prestige also matter? @telkanuru

 

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