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whitmanic

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  • Content count

    13
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About whitmanic

  • Rank
    Decaf

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Cambridge, MA
  • Interests
    Higher cognition, consciousness, resilience, cognitive and affective neuroscience, psychedelics, cognitive-behavioral therapy, anxiety disorders
  • Application Season
    2018 Fall
  • Program
    Cognitive Science/Psychology

Recent Profile Visitors

183 profile views
  1. whitmanic

    Psych MA/MS prereqs leeway: a bizarre situation

    Committed to William & Mary. MAPSS' 1-year term now feels like as much of a downside as an upside. I don't doubt that placements are really good, but I'd be shocked if it measured up in terms of research rigor. Convince me otherwise?
  2. whitmanic

    Anyone Heard Anything from College of William and Mary?

    I got into the psychology MS. Anyone else in the same boat?
  3. whitmanic

    Wake Forest vs. William and Mary

    I'm in the fortunate position of choosing between Wake Forest and William and Mary for masters programs (or maybe a clinical research job closer to where I currently live, but no dice on that front yet), and I wanted to know if anyone who's in this position or who's been here before might be able to comment. Lots of factors to account for, but here are some on my mind: - General reputation / quality of PhD placements: On this point, I know nothing. - General quality of intellectual community: I want more than a good psychology graduate education—I want to be near interesting people doing other interesting things, who I can talk to. - Funding/cost of living: W&M gave me $3,000 more than WFU, stipend-wise. I would guess that Wake Forest is a little cheaper. What's the right take here? - Research opportunities: I'm intrigued but not jazzed about my PI's lab at W&M. WFU has a more open-ended research apprenticeship selection model, which could be better or worse. - Clinical exposure: I'm leaning more and more in the clinical direction, even though my app didn't reflect that more than a little. Thoughts? So little info on this set of programs out there. Also, happy to meet any other admitted students, to either program.
  4. whitmanic

    MAPSS?

    What's your funding status?
  5. whitmanic

    Anyone Heard Anything from College of William and Mary?

    Were you contacted first by a POI, or was this all directly through the grad director? Also, have you applied/been admitted elsewhere? I was accepted to the Wake Forest program, but not a word from anyone—acceptance, rejection, interview, or otherwise, from WM.
  6. whitmanic

    Anyone Heard Anything from College of William and Mary?

    I haven't heard anything, not even from POIs.
  7. whitmanic

    Psych MA/MS prereqs leeway: a bizarre situation

    No—apps to Villanova are due 3/1; I have all the materials prepared.
  8. whitmanic

    Psych MA/MS prereqs leeway: a bizarre situation

    tl;dr—Accepted to WFU psych MA, but don't even meet the minimum requirements for Villanova psych MS. What gives?
  9. Hey all, I'm 25 with a humanities undergrad degree, and coursework in the cognitive sciences. I'm hoping to eventually get a PhD in psychology (critically: not sure whether cognitive or clinical), and have been applying to both terminal MA/MS programs, and full-time RAships, as stepping stones to that end. So far I've applied to Wake Forest, William and Mary, and Bucknell—and am also considering Villanova and UChicago's MAPSS and MACSS. Fast forward to today: I just got into Wake Forest's program with full funding and a stipend. However, I'm not thrilled about the possibility of going to Winston-Salem (not that it's a no!), and want to keep my options as wide-open as possible. Philadelphia, for example, sounds much better, all else equal. Here's the trouble: Villanova's Director of Graduate Studies just responded to my inquiry about their much heavier prereqs (compared to the other programs I applied to) by saying that I have almost everything necessary to apply—but that I'm ineligible until I take 2 more undergrad psych courses. I understand that his word is probably final, but is there any way to leverage the fact that I just got into a comparable program? I'm from the Northeast and would love at least a chance to stay. — Also: thoughts on UChicago's MAPSS and MACSS with a psych focus? 1-year sounds alluring, but I'm not sure how much psych PhD programs respect this route.
  10. These are both really solid answers—thank you. Random question, but: I've been getting e-mails from Brandeis via GRE search, offering me a full fee waiver if I apply to their PhD program. Is this a useful datum, or is Brandeis just being nice?
  11. Hi all, Not sure why it's taken me this long to crowdsource my grad school questions. I was a College Confidential rat in high school, and I think it marginally paid off. It's been 3.5 years since I've been enrolled in/swaddled by an academic institution, though, and my knowledge about grad school app best practices is pretty fragmentary. I'm interested in both the cognitive psychology and clinical psychology tracks — more on that dilemma in another post — and am debating whether to apply to master's programs (contingent on funding) or go straight for the PhD programs I've been eyeing. I know it's late in the game for this cycle, but would ideally like to be enrolled by Fall 2018. As I see it, the upsides to master's first are: - A chance to beef up on coursework - A chance to kick the cognitive/research vs. clinical decision down the road, and learn more to help me make it While the downsides are: - Funding sources are much rarer, I can't afford anything out of pocket, and I'm allergic to debt - Might deprive me of the freedom to pursue the research opportunities I need to keep multiple PhD routes open - It's just not necessary, even if I wait another year to apply for PhD programs — Here's my deal: I was a humanities major at Harvard with a minor in Mind, Brain, and Behavior — but far from the full complement of psychology coursework that a lot of programs, MA and PhD alike, seem to expect. I've devoted a lot of time to reading and living cognitive psych and linguistics literature over the last few years, and have a pretty strong sense that I will be happy studying the mind (and maybe its relationship to wellbeing in a clinical sense) for the long haul. I traveled extensively after graduation, and then spent a year and a half as a business generalist at an early-stage tech startup—a role I quit earlier this year to start pursuing cognitive science research. This June, I started a remote research assistantship for a friend who's a cognitive science postdoc, and last month, I got a research assistantship at a dev psych/linguistics lab at Harvard. I just took the GRE, and got a 170 V 167 M. Some people have told me that some of these fundamentals mean that I shouldn't be afraid of the course and research requirements I see on a lot of program sites. My question is whether people familiar with the field think I can make a case at the PhD-level (or hell, even at the MA-level; I'm not sure about anything) without some of the traditional essentials. Looking forward to hearing your take.
  12. Hi all, Not sure why it's taken me this long to crowdsource my grad school questions. I was a College Confidential rat in high school, and I think it marginally paid off. It's been 3.5 years since I've been enrolled in/swaddled by an academic institution, though, and my knowledge about grad school app best practices is pretty fragmentary. I'm interested in both the cognitive psychology and clinical psychology tracks — more on that dilemma in another post — and am debating whether to apply to master's programs (contingent on funding) or go straight for the PhD programs I've been eyeing. As I see it, the upsides to master's first are: - A chance to beef up on coursework - A chance to kick the cognitive/research vs. clinical decision down the road, and learn more to help me make it While the downsides are: - Funding sources are much rarer, I can't afford anything out of pocket, and I'm allergic to debt - Might deprive me of the freedom to pursue the research opportunities I need to keep multiple PhD routes open — Here's my deal: I was a humanities major at Harvard with a minor in Mind, Brain, and Behavior — but far from the full complement of psychology coursework that a lot of programs, MA and PhD alike, seem to expect. I've devoted a lot of time to reading and living cognitive psych and linguistics literature over the last few years, and have a pretty strong sense that I will be happy studying the mind (and maybe its relationship to wellbeing in a clinical sense) for the long haul. I traveled extensively after graduation, and then spent a year and a half as a business generalist at an early-stage tech startup—a role I quit earlier this year to start pursuing cognitive science research. This June, I started a remote research assistantship for a friend who's a cognitive science postdoc, and last month, I got a research assistantship at a lab at Harvard. I just took the GRE, and got a 170 V 167 M. Some people have told me that some of these fundamentals mean that I shouldn't be afraid of the course and research requirements I see on a lot of program sites. My question is whether people familiar with the field think I can make a case at the PhD-level (or hell, even at the MA-level; I'm not sure about anything) without some of the traditional essentials. Looking forward to hearing your take.
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