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PsyDuck90

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  1. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from fafsaavoidant in Will getting a B in a Masters Clinical Psychology program keep me from getting into PhD program   
    One B is not going to derail your chances of getting into a clinical psych PhD. The main thing that they are really going to be looking at is your research productivity (posters, pubs, etc). As long as you meet the minimum GPA requirements, that's usually pretty low on the list. 
  2. Like
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from like_psyc in Psychology PhDs With Focus on Cognition   
    I would look up recently published journal articles within your area of interest and see where those researchers are working out of. However, keep in mind that there is usually quite a delay between when the research is done and then published. But you can then look at the faculty bios once you get the names. 
  3. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from like_psyc in Reapplicants   
    It's not uncommon for people to go a few rounds and, if the research fit is good, it makes sense to reapply to the same faculty. 
  4. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from Psychhopeful1 in Will getting a B in a Masters Clinical Psychology program keep me from getting into PhD program   
    One B is not going to derail your chances of getting into a clinical psych PhD. The main thing that they are really going to be looking at is your research productivity (posters, pubs, etc). As long as you meet the minimum GPA requirements, that's usually pretty low on the list. 
  5. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SocDevMum in Will getting a B in a Masters Clinical Psychology program keep me from getting into PhD program   
    One B is not going to derail your chances of getting into a clinical psych PhD. The main thing that they are really going to be looking at is your research productivity (posters, pubs, etc). As long as you meet the minimum GPA requirements, that's usually pretty low on the list. 
  6. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SocDevMum in Psychology PhDs With Focus on Cognition   
    I would look up recently published journal articles within your area of interest and see where those researchers are working out of. However, keep in mind that there is usually quite a delay between when the research is done and then published. But you can then look at the faculty bios once you get the names. 
  7. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SoundofSilence in Reapplicants   
    It's not uncommon for people to go a few rounds and, if the research fit is good, it makes sense to reapply to the same faculty. 
  8. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SoundofSilence in Seeking help from psychology graduates in the US   
    For any student, international or domestic, racking up that much debt for a PsyD is honestly not recommended. Also, the worthwhile PsyDs require research as well and require relatively extensive research experience previously. 
    Most of the master's programs that lead to licensure will be about 60 credits. However, licensure varies from state to state, and programs typically align themselves with their state laws. 
    Do you ultimately want to practice in the US or in India? If the latter, I would just make sure that whatever option you choose allows you to work in that capacity in India and then choose the cheapest path. If you plan to go the master's route, I don't really understand why you would complete a master's in India and then another in the US. If you want the master's to make you more competitive for a doctoral program, I would try to focus my efforts on gaining research experience. Especially as an international student, most tuition tends to be even higher than for domestic applicants, so you would really want to get into a program with funding. 
  9. Like
    PsyDuck90 reacted to psych_student4391 in USA Fall 2022 Clinical/Counseling PhD/PsyD   
    Yes! The discord server is anonymous. We offer peer review but take measures to ensure members’ privacy. And there are a few PhD students on there that offer advice and answer questions, as well as repeat applicants who are more than willing to share what they’ve learned from previous cycles. The server has been a very positive environment where members can find resources, as well as get feedback and emotional support and encouragement from peers navigating the same space. 
  10. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 reacted to Clinapp2017 in USA Fall 2022 Clinical/Counseling PhD/PsyD   
    Is the discord anonymous? I have a discord account from gaming with my friends/my lab uses it so I would like to join if you want someone to give advice but I want to remain anonymous.
     
    I thought that was kind of the whole point of grad cafe/SDN... that people could be relatively anonymous. In my case as someone who comments on here/SDN quite a bit to try to help applicants, I want to remain anonymous b/c many people might be applying to my PI's lab (we get 150+ apps any given cycle). Do you have experienced people on there who made it to the other side of the process, or is it just an echo-chamber of applicants? Frankly, when I was applying I did not find talking to other applicants to be personally helpful and it was more anxiety-producing. 
  11. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SocDevMum in LOR Inquiry   
    I agree with this advice. Also, any of the good PsyDs will have a very similar to nearly identical application process to balanced PhD programs. I'm in my 4th year of a PsyD, and I followed this pattern--2 academic letter writers from my psych masters and 1 clinical supervisor from my post-master's job. Most of those who were admitted to my program were similar. 
  12. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 reacted to SocDevMum in LOR Inquiry   
    I would say that at least 2 of your 3 letter writers need to be academic, and specifically the ones who can speak to your ability to do scientific research if you want to do a PhD. I don't know that I would choose the business prof as a letter writer unless he/she is your third one, after two academics in the field. A clinical supervisor could be a good third letter writer, if you are applying to programs that are at least equally split if not heavily leaning more to practice than research, but I really don't think you can avoid having two strong letters from the profs you had as a Masters student. 
    If you are doing a PsyD, though, it might work, but I would defer to someone who is actually in a PsyD who can better inform you of the realities of their application process.
  13. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 reacted to PsyberPsych3311 in APA Accreditation at prestigious universities   
    APA accreditation is definitely important for School Psych doctoral programs!!! Same accreditation process for all Health Service Psych programs, which includes Clinical, Counseling, and School. Attending a non-APA accredited school psych doc program would be just as unwise as attending an unaccredited clinical or counseling program - limits internship options and career options outside of a public school setting. 
    There are a lot of Masters/Specialist level-only School Psych programs and APA does not accredit those - NASP does. Just want to clarify the difference in case anyone is looking at school psych!
     
  14. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SoundofSilence in Single-Courses to Psy.D.? + Where or how can I find supervising professionals for 3,000 intern hours for clinical licensure?   
    If your primary goal is to do therapy as a side-gig, I would look into MFT or social work programs. You can get licensed as a master's level therapist and work towards licensure that way. 
  15. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 reacted to SendMeAnEmailPlz in Single-Courses to Psy.D.? + Where or how can I find supervising professionals for 3,000 intern hours for clinical licensure?   
    Why are you only interested in a PhD/PsyD? Your master's degree in general management will not let you do therapy. An MFT or social work program will. If you're looking to get a quality return on your investment, those are the programs that will do it.
    You are not going to find a PsyD program in California that is worth the money. The 3 schools you named are all scams. APA accreditation is a bare minimum requirement.
     
  16. Like
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from Clinapp2017 in Single-Courses to Psy.D.? + Where or how can I find supervising professionals for 3,000 intern hours for clinical licensure?   
    While California doesn't 100% require completing an APA-accredited doctoral program for licensure, it will make the licensing process infinitely easier because you have to prove the program meets those standards. Doctoral programs are full-time because all of the course work and clinical practicums take up the time of a full time job (arguably more so). Also, you cannot get an APA-accredited internship if you do not go to an APA-accredited program, nor can you even apply to non-accredited internships on APPIC, which is the application process for all formal internship programs. You would be left on your own to piece together an internship. 
    The cheapest route to becoming a licensed clinical psychologist is to make yourself a competitive applicant for all the funded PsyD and PhD programs out there (funding is the norm, not the exception). 
  17. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SoundofSilence in Single-Courses to Psy.D.? + Where or how can I find supervising professionals for 3,000 intern hours for clinical licensure?   
    While California doesn't 100% require completing an APA-accredited doctoral program for licensure, it will make the licensing process infinitely easier because you have to prove the program meets those standards. Doctoral programs are full-time because all of the course work and clinical practicums take up the time of a full time job (arguably more so). Also, you cannot get an APA-accredited internship if you do not go to an APA-accredited program, nor can you even apply to non-accredited internships on APPIC, which is the application process for all formal internship programs. You would be left on your own to piece together an internship. 
    The cheapest route to becoming a licensed clinical psychologist is to make yourself a competitive applicant for all the funded PsyD and PhD programs out there (funding is the norm, not the exception). 
  18. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SocDevMum in Single-Courses to Psy.D.? + Where or how can I find supervising professionals for 3,000 intern hours for clinical licensure?   
    While California doesn't 100% require completing an APA-accredited doctoral program for licensure, it will make the licensing process infinitely easier because you have to prove the program meets those standards. Doctoral programs are full-time because all of the course work and clinical practicums take up the time of a full time job (arguably more so). Also, you cannot get an APA-accredited internship if you do not go to an APA-accredited program, nor can you even apply to non-accredited internships on APPIC, which is the application process for all formal internship programs. You would be left on your own to piece together an internship. 
    The cheapest route to becoming a licensed clinical psychologist is to make yourself a competitive applicant for all the funded PsyD and PhD programs out there (funding is the norm, not the exception). 
  19. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SocDevMum in Super Noob Here (please help me)   
    If you're interested in straight therapy, you don't really need a PhD. I would look into master's level programs that lead to licensure as either an LPC, LCSW (MSW degree), or MFT depending on the state. Licensure laws vary from state to state, especially for master's level clinicians, so it is best to get trained in the state you are most interested in practicing. An MSW tends to be a more portable degree than an LPC/MFT, and MSWs can bill Medicare, while LPCs cannot. This makes getting a job in a hospital system much easier with an MSW than an LPC. 
    CACREP is becoming more important in more states. However, there are also some great master's programs housed in psychology departments that don't be the requirements for CACREP accreditation because they have clinical or counseling psychologists on staff (CACREP requires that all faculty have a PhD in Counselor Education). 
    Check with the licensure laws in the state(s) you are most interested in living/practicing. Typically, your best bet is state schools. They tend to provide solid training and are often far cheaper than private universities. 
    Most license-eligible programs won't have much in the way of research opportunities (although some do), so they aren't always the best route for a PhD in Clinical or Counseling Psychology. You can always pursue a PhD in Counselor Education or Social Work, but those are purely research/academic degrees, as the licensure in those disciplines is at the master's level. 
    It's not impossible to transition, but it will typically take more work on your part to ensure you get the research experiences necessary to be competitive to PhD programs following the master's. 
  20. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from Kaykay321 in Super Noob Here (please help me)   
    If you're interested in straight therapy, you don't really need a PhD. I would look into master's level programs that lead to licensure as either an LPC, LCSW (MSW degree), or MFT depending on the state. Licensure laws vary from state to state, especially for master's level clinicians, so it is best to get trained in the state you are most interested in practicing. An MSW tends to be a more portable degree than an LPC/MFT, and MSWs can bill Medicare, while LPCs cannot. This makes getting a job in a hospital system much easier with an MSW than an LPC. 
    CACREP is becoming more important in more states. However, there are also some great master's programs housed in psychology departments that don't be the requirements for CACREP accreditation because they have clinical or counseling psychologists on staff (CACREP requires that all faculty have a PhD in Counselor Education). 
    Check with the licensure laws in the state(s) you are most interested in living/practicing. Typically, your best bet is state schools. They tend to provide solid training and are often far cheaper than private universities. 
    Most license-eligible programs won't have much in the way of research opportunities (although some do), so they aren't always the best route for a PhD in Clinical or Counseling Psychology. You can always pursue a PhD in Counselor Education or Social Work, but those are purely research/academic degrees, as the licensure in those disciplines is at the master's level. 
    It's not impossible to transition, but it will typically take more work on your part to ensure you get the research experiences necessary to be competitive to PhD programs following the master's. 
  21. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SoundofSilence in Super Noob Here (please help me)   
    If you're interested in straight therapy, you don't really need a PhD. I would look into master's level programs that lead to licensure as either an LPC, LCSW (MSW degree), or MFT depending on the state. Licensure laws vary from state to state, especially for master's level clinicians, so it is best to get trained in the state you are most interested in practicing. An MSW tends to be a more portable degree than an LPC/MFT, and MSWs can bill Medicare, while LPCs cannot. This makes getting a job in a hospital system much easier with an MSW than an LPC. 
    CACREP is becoming more important in more states. However, there are also some great master's programs housed in psychology departments that don't be the requirements for CACREP accreditation because they have clinical or counseling psychologists on staff (CACREP requires that all faculty have a PhD in Counselor Education). 
    Check with the licensure laws in the state(s) you are most interested in living/practicing. Typically, your best bet is state schools. They tend to provide solid training and are often far cheaper than private universities. 
    Most license-eligible programs won't have much in the way of research opportunities (although some do), so they aren't always the best route for a PhD in Clinical or Counseling Psychology. You can always pursue a PhD in Counselor Education or Social Work, but those are purely research/academic degrees, as the licensure in those disciplines is at the master's level. 
    It's not impossible to transition, but it will typically take more work on your part to ensure you get the research experiences necessary to be competitive to PhD programs following the master's. 
  22. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SoundofSilence in APA Accreditation at prestigious universities   
    APA accreditation is only for PhD/PsyD programs in Clinical or Counseling Psychology (and School Psychology to some extent), as those are the ones that lead to clinical licensure. I don't know about all the schools you've mentioned, but for instance, Princeton does not have a Clinical or Counseling Psychology PhD program. Their psychology PhDs are strictly research focused. A Clinical or Counseling Psychology program has specific courses related to clinical practice and practicum experiences interwoven into the curriculum, which research only PhDs (like Social or Developmental) do not. 
  23. Like
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from BDD4343 in APA Accreditation at prestigious universities   
    APA accreditation is only for PhD/PsyD programs in Clinical or Counseling Psychology (and School Psychology to some extent), as those are the ones that lead to clinical licensure. I don't know about all the schools you've mentioned, but for instance, Princeton does not have a Clinical or Counseling Psychology PhD program. Their psychology PhDs are strictly research focused. A Clinical or Counseling Psychology program has specific courses related to clinical practice and practicum experiences interwoven into the curriculum, which research only PhDs (like Social or Developmental) do not. 
  24. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from higaisha in Lack of eye contact sufficient to assign the ASD/Autism criterion A2 Deflicts in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction?   
    I would recommend you speak with the psychologist supervising your research, as no one on here is qualified to help you make diagnoses. 
  25. Upvote
    PsyDuck90 got a reaction from SocDevMum in How to earn credits of required courses if I want to be admitted to a master program in psychology without a relevant bachelor degree   
    You can take them at a community college (not sure if they are a thing where you are), but in the US those credits tend to be pretty cheap. Also, look up the specific master's programs you are interested in and make sure what courses you actually need for those programs. 
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