Jump to content

Canadian Applicants 2014


Recommended Posts

Hello,

 

I thought I would start this for those of us who have applied to Canadian universities for graduate studies. I have applied to four clinical psychology programs across Canada. I am hoping to enter into a Clinical Psychology program as a graduate student.

 

I figure this is a good place for us to share our experience/success/frustration and so forth.

 

Cheers,

 

Charlize

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 172
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Well my research interests were very specific and so I only applied to schools with professors in my area. Out of 7 programs I applied to three Canadian schools, two of which were in my top 3. What re

i think UBC recruitment is the weekend of Feb 7th, not the 14th.

Clinical may do things differently but when I interviewed last year the meetings were one-on-one and pretty informal. I wouldn't really call them interviews at all, just meetings that let the two of y

 

I made the transition to Canada from New York just this year (I'm a 1st year MSc student). If anyone is in a similar situation or has any questions about moving from the US to Canada, I'd be more than happy to help out in any way that I can :-)

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I made the transition to Canada from New York just this year (I'm a 1st year MSc student). If anyone is in a similar situation or has any questions about moving from the US to Canada, I'd be more than happy to help out in any way that I can :-)

 

Hi,

What made you to transfer from NewYork to Canada ?? I mean I was also thinking to apply in canadian schools for my MS in I/O along with US universities. So it would be great if you can share your experience with Canada and what benefits an international student can reap in Canada ?? I am bit skeptical considering Canada for my MS in terms of quality education and job opportunities.

 

Thanks in advance to take some time out to have a look at it. 

 

regards

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am bit skeptical considering Canada for my MS in terms of quality education and job opportunities.

 

Well that's not very nice to write off an entire country. Of course there is a range of programs, but many Canadian universities rank among the world's best. My own department is in the top 15 social psychology programs in the world. I also see two Canadian IO departments on this SOIP list of top 40 IO programs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some great schools in Canada.  You may have missed the deadlines for most of them, though.  Psyc deadlines are usually pretty early in the U.S. and Canada. 

 

FYI-I am American and my top choice is a Canadian school.  Had I finalized my decision about my graduate education sooner, I would have applied to mostly Canadian schools. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I made the transition to Canada from New York just this year (I'm a 1st year MSc student). If anyone is in a similar situation or has any questions about moving from the US to Canada, I'd be more than happy to help out in any way that I can :-)

 

I have a million questions, but I'll start with this one:  How hard was the student visa process?  Are you planning to stay once you're done with your education? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

What made you to transfer from NewYork to Canada ?? I mean I was also thinking to apply in canadian schools for my MS in I/O along with US universities. So it would be great if you can share your experience with Canada and what benefits an international student can reap in Canada ?? I am bit skeptical considering Canada for my MS in terms of quality education and job opportunities.

 

Thanks in advance to take some time out to have a look at it. 

 

regards

Well my research interests were very specific and so I only applied to schools with professors in my area. Out of 7 programs I applied to three Canadian schools, two of which were in my top 3. What really sealed the deal for me at my current program was the structure of the program and the perfect match with my supervisor. 

 

I'd say some of the benefits that I've learned about so far are the funding opportunities. I would say, hands down, the Canadian government (e.g., SSHRC/CIHR is probably akin to the NSF) provides way more opportunities for everyone, ranging from first year students to tenured professors. While I can't really benefit now, it is my expectation to apply for residency after I get my masters in the hopes of landing a job here as well. While I don't yet know much about the Canadian job market, from what I've heard it's pretty much the same as the U.S.

 

However, if staying in Canada is not something you are considering, much more of your decision will have to focus on how the program fits your internets and needs. I certainly wouldn't dismiss the quality of Canadian Universities. While my program (i.e., social psych) is really small here, the professors are all incredibly well-known and highly respected in their specialities. Classes are top-notch and student focused (not something most people experience at research universities). I also like how my program is more distinctly divided into MS + PhD rather than straight PhD track because I have the opportunity to complete a master's thesis (whereas at my ugrad they just took comps). Because of this I have had more hands-on independent research opportunities than some of my friends who are second and third year phd students elsewhere. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a million questions, but I'll start with this one:  How hard was the student visa process?  Are you planning to stay once you're done with your education? 

This was honestly the easiest part. I flew into Vancouver without so much as even printing off a Visa application. I only brought along my acceptance letter and a copy of my funding, handed it to the agent, and within 15-20 mins he stapled my visa into my passport. 

 

And I do hope to stay. Because my program is split into MS + PhD they only issued me a visa for 2 years (covering the MS) forcing me to renew (FYI: a work around to this is to have your advisor write you a letter stating that you are definitely guaranteed to stay for X amount of years). I've been looking into it and apparently, especially as a U.S. citizen, it is relatively easy to gain permanent residency after completing your master's or at least 2 years in a straight PhD track. In fact, I was talking with one of my lab mates who told me that his friend basically only had to sign a paper (now it's probably not THAT easy, but easier than you would think). This may vary depending on which province you will be in, so look into the regulations for the specific provincial nominee program (the program that students are able to gain residency through without work experience).

Edited by sdt13
Link to post
Share on other sites
 

One general piece of advice for anyone seriously considering Canadian universities, make sure to try and stay in contact with your POI. This will show them that you are seriously interested. Also, don't be afraid to actually tell your POI exactly how interested you are. Now, in the first email don't profess your love of them or the program in a creepy fan-girl/desperate sounding way, but get to know them a bit more (provided they are interested…not everyone is or has the time, but your effort is important regardless) and if a program is really in the top let your POI know. This way they know you are serious and will be willing to put in the extra legwork (if necessary) to try and take you. 

 

Also, don't be discouraged if you hear back later than everyone else. For example, two of my three Canadian POIs didnt contact me with a formal interview or decision until March-April because, despite being their top-choice candidate, they were afraid to approach me without funding. In fact, my supervisor now didnt interview me until April 12th or so because he was sure I wasn't going to choose somewhere else (he actually told me during our first face-to-face meeting that he was surprised I chose his program based on the other schools I applied to).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well my research interests were very specific and so I only applied to schools with professors in my area. Out of 7 programs I applied to three Canadian schools, two of which were in my top 3. What really sealed the deal for me at my current program was the structure of the program and the perfect match with my supervisor. 

 

I'd say some of the benefits that I've learned about so far are the funding opportunities. I would say, hands down, the Canadian government (e.g., SSHRC/CIHR is probably akin to the NSF) provides way more opportunities for everyone, ranging from first year students to tenured professors. While I can't really benefit now, it is my expectation to apply for residency after I get my masters in the hopes of landing a job here as well. While I don't yet know much about the Canadian job market, from what I've heard it's pretty much the same as the U.S.

 

However, if staying in Canada is not something you are considering, much more of your decision will have to focus on how the program fits your internets and needs. I certainly wouldn't dismiss the quality of Canadian Universities. While my program (i.e., social psych) is really small here, the professors are all incredibly well-known and highly respected in their specialities. Classes are top-notch and student focused (not something most people experience at research universities). I also like how my program is more distinctly divided into MS + PhD rather than straight PhD track because I have the opportunity to complete a master's thesis (whereas at my ugrad they just took comps). Because of this I have had more hands-on independent research opportunities than some of my friends who are second and third year phd students elsewhere. 

Thanks Double Shot for your input. It will really help me as i have had pretty weird notions about Canadian Schools but now it seems to be resolved.

Again thank you and best of luck with future career so far.

 

regards 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just heard back from two universities about their timlines:

University of Victories hopes to compile a list of short-listed applicants by January 14

Simon Fraser University hopes to contact short-listed applicants by January 10

 

Cheers!

 

And best of luck to those making the move from the states to Canada :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in the US, and one of my advisers actually suggested that studying psychology in Canada might limit my career options. Can anyone currently in a Canadian psychology program speak to this? Specifically, is it true that going to school in Canada can make it difficult to get an academic job in the US? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in the US, and one of my advisers actually suggested that studying psychology in Canada might limit my career options. Can anyone currently in a Canadian psychology program speak to this? Specifically, is it true that going to school in Canada can make it difficult to get an academic job in the US? 

I would think that if you go to a US school, your advisor might be somewhat better connected to other professors in the US, which might help a little during job-search. However, if you can get into a top program at a Canadian school, I don't see why that should be a problem. But your advisor might know better since he/ she is already in the field.. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think that if you go to a US school, your advisor might be somewhat better connected to other professors in the US, which might help a little during job-search. However, if you can get into a top program at a Canadian school, I don't see why that should be a problem. But your advisor might know better since he/ she is already in the field.. :)

 

I agree with this to some extent... it "might limit" some options for the average Canadian program vs. the average US program. But limit is such a vague word. It's not like we're isolated up here; at the top, social psychology is a very small world. A few anecdotes: (i) Almost all my PhD friends who did post docs went to US places like Columbia, Stanford, Cornell, Yale, Princeton. (ii) Three of my last four program alumni who got faculty positions were offered US jobs. (iii) Almost all of the faculty in my program have American PhDs so they're connected to that system too.

 

I also see that the poster applied at UofT. That's a great program and I would be very surprised if--all else equal--you had a harder time finding a job with that degree than one from most of the other places on your list.

Link to post
Share on other sites

CharlizeRai,

 

Thanks for that information! Those are the two Canadian schools I applied to, and didn't know what to expect in terms of hearing back. Simon Fraser's interview date is Jan 31st, so I'm eager to know whether or not I got an interview.

 

Do you know when UVic's interview date is? I couldn't find it anywhere!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so glad I came across this thread, two schools I applied for are mentioned. SFU applicants should be done tomorrow then! Ahh. Making me even more nervous.

Edited by Sevenoffs
Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally heard back from SFU (the first school I've heard back from!).

I know a lot of schools will fly applicants out for the interview, but it didn't say anything about that in the email--just to let them know what interview form (phone, skype, in-person) I would prefer. Does anyone have any more information about this? Maybe it's not standard practice in Canada to fly applicants out...?

It looks like a couple of clinical people have already heard back from UVic about interviews. I'm glad to know their official day isn't until the 14th, because I haven't heard from them at all!! Fingers crossed!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally heard back from SFU (the first school I've heard back from!).

I know a lot of schools will fly applicants out for the interview, but it didn't say anything about that in the email--just to let them know what interview form (phone, skype, in-person) I would prefer. Does anyone have any more information about this? Maybe it's not standard practice in Canada to fly applicants out...?

It looks like a couple of clinical people have already heard back from UVic about interviews. I'm glad to know their official day isn't until the 14th, because I haven't heard from them at all!! Fingers crossed!!

Damn. My friend heard back from here. I'm assuming I didn't get an interview, sad times. But totally expected because I didn't have good fit with any of the professors.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.