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Levon3

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Everything posted by Levon3

  1. Thank you, @fuzzylogician!
  2. What I'm wondering is, how can I convince my IRB office to change the status of my approval from expedited to exempt using the fact that other institution's IRB office deemed it to be so? Has anyone had success with such a predicament?
  3. Right, it's just that this is a virtual event, so getting people to mail back forms is extremely unlikely. Therefore, we'll likely get a whole lot more "yes"s on the survey than forms mailed back, which means if I continue on the project I'll be limiting the number of participants whose data we can collect.
  4. One thing to consider is that some faculty positions, if you'll be working with pre-service teachers, require at least some K-12 teaching experience.
  5. I'm trying to do a research project in partnership with a researcher at another institution. I submitted my IRB application and got it approved before my collaborator did. Mine is categorized as expedited but he just heard back that his is exempt. So under my IRB, participants must sign consent forms and mail them back, but under the other institution's, all they need to do is check yes on a survey. I called my IRB to try to find out how we can get these to be reconciled, and they basically said they don't care what the other institution does, that's how mine has to be done. It seems that if my collaborator moves ahead with consent via survey checkbox, I'll no longer be able to work on the project (which I designed). Does anyone else have experience partnering with researchers at other institutions? Do you have any advice for me?
  6. Yes. They are deliberate about awarding to underrepresented groups. Not sure about this. You can download last years' awards and sort by subfield--it might help you answer this question.
  7. I didn't. Didn't want to chance it being against the 1" margin rules.
  8. My hunch is that the latter would be better. If she knows you well, and can write in detail about your work and aptitude, this seems more powerful than a stock letter that they may have read before. How well does the first prof know you? (Also, keep in mind that I am a 2nd year PhD student, so I may not know what I am talking about.)
  9. http://www.lindenwood.edu/academics/centers-institutes/future-institute-research-center/scholarship/
  10. If I knew a rec letter-writer was going to include some CV details, I left it out of my statement. Otherwise, I just tried really hard to paint a cohesive picture of how the relevant experiences fit in with the path. Last year I emailed people in my field on the awardee list and asked if they'd be willing to share their statements with me. A few did. Those few were super helpful as examples of how to word it. There are also quite a few examples posted around the internet. But to answer your question, my instinct was to try to mention everything, and it worked for me.
  11. I suspect that this varies by field. In my field, it is acceptable to cite it as you would any journal article, but where you would normally print the title of the journal, instead write, "Manuscript in preparation" or "Manuscript under review" (depending on which is true). For example (APA): Harding, M. W. (2017). A receptor for the immuno-suppressant FK 506 is a cis–trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase. Manuscript in preparation.
  12. They know that nothing is set in stone. Even if you're in your first or second year of a PhD program, your ideas will not be set in stone. What matters is that you can write a coherent, focused, achievable plan. Show that you know what steps will be involved and how it will add to the literature in a meaningful way. You are not tied--at all--to actually completing that plan. Also, FWIW, I heard from professors that the personal statement is perhaps more important than the research plan. They are funding a scholar, not a proposal for this fellowship-- they know you're just beginning and that your research agenda may shift substantially.
  13. I'm a 2017 fellow, so I don't mind sharing trade secrets I had my advisor, my DGS, a classmate who had received the fellowship the previous year, and a friend in my cohort read my research statement. And a staff member at my university's writing center. I had 7 references.
  14. For prospective PhD students, I know that funding can be one of the most important considerations. I receive emails about funded programs, but this info may not be widely available to applicants. So I thought I would share such information on PhD programs that offer funding and/or fellowships. Here is the first (Southern Methodist University): http://www.smu.edu/Simmons/Research/RME/Explore/MMaRS/MMaRS_Jobs
  15. In terms of organizing strands as I build my lit review, I have been trying to use Scrivener--it allows me to rearrange and create subordinate/superordinate categories really easily.
  16. Many people post their stats here; you can try searching different terms to get a feel for the range of GPAs and GRE scores. http://www.thegradcafe.com/survey/index.php?q=teachers+college+clinical+psychology
  17. Levon3

    HGSE 2017

    I have met Harvard College graduates who do. But ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ #elitism
  18. I see you are at Columbia, which is where I got my master's as well. Their financial aid office helped me apply for the grad plus loan, and answered all my questions.
  19. This, of course, depends on your field. Columbia offered me exactly $0 in stipend, and most of my colleagues worked multiple jobs + took out loans to afford their PhDs.
  20. Look under "the menu," perhaps under business? http://forum.thegradcafe.com/forum/14-business/
  21. Levon3

    Nashville, TN

    It's really not that bad, y'all. I live in the music row area, and feel much safer than when I lived in my hometown. What's your price range?
  22. 2. I did mention the circumstances that led to my low undergrad GPA. But I tried to do it in a brief mention inside a much longer sentence about all the things that I accomplished during my undergrad. It worked for me. 3. I had a letter writer mention that for me. If I hadn't known she was willing to do that, though, I think I would have mentioned it in my SOP. I believe it is relevant information--90% of low-income, first gen students don't graduate on time. So I think it puts my accomplishments into perspective.
  23. Also, they may halve the number of fellowships next year...
  24. I've heard that it happens, but unfortunately I don't have any information on when.
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