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mr_grad

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  1. mr_grad

    Tips/tricks for studying/what to spend the most time on??

    Taking it in a month is good. In all likelihood, you will take it again to improve. Having taken the real test is an excellent step. Use this in your back of your mind to alleviate any pressure on yourself. In terms of study, look at your analyses for the timed tests you've done. If you have done Manhattan (or any other reputable company) there will be a breakdown. Notice what the issues might be - is there any specific topic in quant you're consistently missing (probability, combinatorics, sets, geometry etc)? Or a type of question consistently wrong (maybe quant comparison, or logic reasoning for verbal etc)? Focus on those if so. Also, be sure to check out your timing. QC should be < 90s. Notice if you are being "stubborn" on questions. For example, if you are taking 3-4mins on ANY question - that is ridiculous. Know when to say "OK, this one is not my question." and move on. Don't sacrifice your entire GRE score for one question. Once you've looked at all this stuff. Study that way. Use a timer. Pressure yourself. Do mixed sets as well as focusing on your weaker areas (we all have them, save for 3% of the pop). Vocab wise - you just have to study 10-20 words day every day. That's it. Swatting won't help. Good luck.
  2. mr_grad

    Should I Apply For Grad School Or Not?

    RE whether you should apply: the short answer is yes. You need to let yourself explore this if it's something that's been on your mind for some time (which it sounds like it has been). You made a big leap from the state school to the more reputable public university. Your cumulative GPA is 3.03, which is above the minimum. You then succeeded in your work environment in applying all this knowledge. You were promoted and have solid a performance rating. These are positive things. You need to focus on the positive aspects. Highlight these and be confident. This is life and you need to fend for yourself. RE your job: It sounds as though you heave reached the ceiling there. It is natural for employees and people to want to grow. Any good manager should understand this. Whether or not your manager "wants" you to pursue a masters is irrelevant. You can still be respectful to this person, but ultimately you need to think about yourself and do what is best for you. N Apply. It will not be easy. Don't delay a year; you might just learn from this year's applications what you need to do next year and be able to fulfill your ambitions. Good luck!
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