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Dwar

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Dwar last won the day on February 26

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  1. Just want to chime in and say that I agree with this statement and that fit is in my opinion one of the most important things. An applicant can have the best scores and grades possible and still get all rejections if they do not have great fit with a department.
  2. Say that you have a few options on the table and are still deciding. They may ask for specifics and it’s up to you to provide those answers or not. If the faculty members are genuine they may provide honest feedback about some of the other schools you are looking at. If that happens be sure to take their advice to heart, but keep in mind that they are still trying to sell you on their program. ALSO, just wanted to point out that many places in the Midwest (outside of Chicago) have extremely low COL, do the lower stipend may actually turn out to be more then a higher stupiden in the coasts. With that being said, I agree that you should only try and get more money if you’re prepared to accept their new offer right as they make it. I don’t think it’s a good idea to go through that process unless you are sure you’d accept their new higher offer.
  3. Hey all, just wanted to urge everyone who’s made their decisions for next year to post in the results discussion/thread! it’s a great resource to share the knowledge that you’ve accumulated with next years cohort!
  4. Simple answer: No. It isn’t about where you go to undergrad, it’s what you do while you’re there.
  5. I would strongly advise you to take the Minnesota acceptance. I have two reasons for saying this. the first one is that you should avoid debt at all costs. Academic careers do not pay enough to warrant the massive debt that a Chicago degree would bring. I’m not sure how much debt you have from undergrad but let me tell you that event 20k is crippling and will prevent you from doing a lot of things when you want to (house, car, vacation). Avoid it at all costs. The second reason I’m advising Minnesota is that grad school admissions, especially PhD admissions, is an absolute shit show. There is zero guarantee that you would be able to get into a school of similar rank and prestige as Minnesota next time, much less a better program. Often times in grad admissions there are factors at play that applicants have no control over. Things that change from year to year. As a PhD is your ultimate goal I would strongly urge you to accept the offer you have now, instead of taking the huge gamble of trying again next time.
  6. That’s what I keep telling myself. Also, the financial impact of keeping a school closed for an additional semester would be monumental and Something that I’m sure most schools would want to avoid. But ya know, the fear is there!
  7. HAHA same. My work is enforcing a work from home policy for the next two weeks. Super surreal. i think my worst case scenario (besides like dying from it) is that the school closures will spill over into the fall semester and I won’t be able to attend grad school in August.
  8. Okay so debt is super scary. I've been lucky enough to have about half the national average of undergrad debt in the US, but it's still alot and does concern me. I'll be paying off my debt for a good 10-15 years after i graduate. It has prevented me from doing many things, and i imagine it will prevent me from doing other stuff once i graduate (house, vacation, investments). If you plan to pursue a PhD or go into academia after your degree i can only say that this applies even more. Academic jobs generally do not pay enough to warrant additional significant debt. While i do not know your personal financial situation, i can only advise to go the rout of least debt. Future you will be thankful.
  9. TBH, and i have literally no experience or extended knowledge of the Canadian academic system, but it seems that McGill and UT are both one of the big three, so i'm not sure there is really a substantial difference. Again, i have very little knowledge of the Canadian system so i may be very wrong, but that's just my take. What i do know about though, is that you should try not to acquire debt during grad school. Especially if you are a planning a career in academia after, debt is a killer and will follow you everywhere and prevent you from living life. So i would strongly recommend attending the school that will leave you with the least amount of debt.
  10. Are either of them funded? If not, which school would you take out the least amount of debt with?
  11. Who gave you the most financial aid? Honestly that is the most important factor when looking at an MA degree, especially in policy where the earning potential of an MD or JD generally aren’t there.
  12. While I do disagree on a few placements, I do generally agree with the overall structure and placement of your rankings. I definitely think that the tier system is far more important then specific numbers, and often times us, as applicants, place waaaaaaaay to much significance on a single number. I appreciate the visual that you created to help push that through.
  13. Honestly, unless you are applying to like Rochester or NYU or another math heavy program, I think stats and methods (R/STATA) is really all that matters. Sure going further into math might show that you really know your stuff, but unless you actually enjoy it and are sure that you'll do well in those classes i don't really see a point. Be sure to mention both your stats course and your methods training in your SOP, and if possible incorporate methods into your writing sample. Like what was said above, at the end of the day programs are going to either care about the GRE score or they aren't. At the end of the day it is just one facet of your profile. Rightly or wrongly (in my opinion wrongly) some programs use the GRE as a filter for applicants, so i'd just recommend you avoid those programs. If you have an otherwise outstanding profile i see no reason why you shouldn't get accepted anywhere that you apply (within reason).
  14. Definitely not the norm. In my experience with grad administrators, they’ve all been amazing. This is from experience at schools that I’ve been both admitted and rejected from. while I obviously don’t know the specific school or specific situation, I’d only say that while it’s great and make your life hella easier to have a responsive and caring person In that position, ultimately it’s the professors that make or break a program.
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